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Int. J. Mol. Sci., Volume 17, Issue 11 (November 2016)

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Cover Story Fireworks of p53 Proteoforms Illustrate the Protein Structure–Function Continuum Concept p53 is a [...] Read more.
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Editorial

Jump to: Research, Review, Other

Open AccessEditorial Editorial: Analysis of the Interaction of Dp44mT with Human Serum Albumin and Calf Thymus DNA Using Molecular Docking and Spectroscopic Techniques
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1914; doi:10.3390/ijms17111914
Received: 10 November 2016 / Revised: 10 November 2016 / Accepted: 10 November 2016 / Published: 16 November 2016
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Abstract
This Editorial refers to: Full article
Open AccessEditorial Translational Medicine: Creating the Crucial Bidirectional Bridge between Bench and Bedside
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1918; doi:10.3390/ijms17111918
Received: 11 November 2016 / Revised: 11 November 2016 / Accepted: 11 November 2016 / Published: 16 November 2016
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(This article belongs to the Section Molecular Pathology, Diagnostics, and Therapeutics)

Research

Jump to: Editorial, Review, Other

Open AccessArticle Upregulated MicroRNA-25 Mediates the Migration of Melanoma Cells by Targeting DKK3 through the WNT/β-Catenin Pathway
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1124; doi:10.3390/ijms17111124
Received: 14 April 2016 / Revised: 20 May 2016 / Accepted: 31 May 2016 / Published: 27 October 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (4800 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Previous research indicates that microRNA-25 (miR-25) regulates carcinogenesis and the progression of various cancers, but the role of miR-25 in melanoma remains unclear. We observed that miR-25 was significantly upregulated in melanoma cell lines and tissue samples. Downregulation of miR-25 markedly suppressed invasion
[...] Read more.
Previous research indicates that microRNA-25 (miR-25) regulates carcinogenesis and the progression of various cancers, but the role of miR-25 in melanoma remains unclear. We observed that miR-25 was significantly upregulated in melanoma cell lines and tissue samples. Downregulation of miR-25 markedly suppressed invasion and proliferation of melanoma cells in vitro; however, overexpression of miR-25 markedly increased melanoma cell invasion and proliferation. Moreover, we observed Dickkopf-related protein 3 (DKK3) as a direct target of miR-25 in vitro. Upregulation of DKK3 partially attenuated the oncogenic effect of miR-25 on melanoma cells. Ectopic expression of miR-25 in melanoma cells induced β-catenin accumulation in nuclear and inhibited TCF4 (T cell factor 4) activity, as well as the expression of c-Myc and Cyclin D1. In a nude xenograft model, miR-25 upregulation significantly increased A375 melanoma growth. In summary, miR-25 is upregulated in melanoma and promotes melanoma cell proliferation and invasion, partially by targeting DKK3. These results were indicated that miR-25 may serve as a potential target for the treatment of melanoma in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection Regulation by Non-Coding RNAs)
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Open AccessArticle Age-Related Modulations of AQP4 and Caveolin-1 in the Hippocampus Predispose the Toxic Effect of Phoneutria nigriventer Spider Venom
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1462; doi:10.3390/ijms17111462
Received: 23 June 2016 / Revised: 1 August 2016 / Accepted: 22 August 2016 / Published: 23 November 2016
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Abstract
We have previously demonstrated that Phoneutria nigriventer venom (PNV) causes blood–brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, swelling of astrocytes end-feet and fluid permeation into brain interstitium in rats. Caveolae and water channels respond to BBB alterations by co-participation in shear stress response and edema formation/resolution.
[...] Read more.
We have previously demonstrated that Phoneutria nigriventer venom (PNV) causes blood–brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, swelling of astrocytes end-feet and fluid permeation into brain interstitium in rats. Caveolae and water channels respond to BBB alterations by co-participation in shear stress response and edema formation/resolution. Herein, we showed post-natal developmental-related changes of two BBB-associated transporter proteins: the endothelial caveolin-1 (Cav-1), the major scaffolding protein from caveolae frame, and the astroglial aquaporin-4 (AQP4), the main water channel protein expressed in astrocytic peri-vascular end-feet processes, in the hippocampus of rats intraperitoneally-administered PNV. Western blotting protein levels; immunohistochemistry (IHC) protein distribution in CA1, CA2, and CA3 subfields; and gene expression by Real Time-Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) were assessed in post-natal Day 14 (P14) and 8–10-week-old rats over critical periods of envenomation. The intensity and duration of the toxic manifestations indicate P14 neonate rats more vulnerable to PNV than adults. Histologically, the capillaries of P14 and 8–10-week-old rats treated with PNV showed perivascular edema, while controls did not. The intensity of the toxic manifestations in P14 decreases temporally (2 > 5 > 24 h), while inversely the expression of AQP4 and Cav-1 peaked at 24 h when clinically PNV-treated animals do not differ from saline controls. IHC of AQP4 revealed that hippocampal CA1 showed the least expression at 2 h when toxic manifestation was maximal. Subfield IHC quantification revealed that in P14 rats Cav-1 peaked at 24 h when toxic manifestations were absent, whereas in 8–10-week-old rats Cav-1 peaked at 2 h when toxic signs were highest, and progressively attenuated such increases until 24 h, remaining though significantly above baseline. Considering astrocyte-endothelial physical and functional interactions, we hypothesize that age-related modulations of AQP4 and Cav-1 might be linked both to changes in functional properties of astrocytes during post-natal development and in the BBB breakdown induced by the venom of P. nigriventer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aquaporin)
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Open AccessArticle Leaf Volatile Compounds and Associated Gene Expression during Short-Term Nitrogen Deficient Treatments in Cucumis Seedlings
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1713; doi:10.3390/ijms17111713
Received: 20 July 2016 / Revised: 27 September 2016 / Accepted: 8 October 2016 / Published: 2 November 2016
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Abstract
Nitrogen (N) is an important macronutrient for plant growth and development, but the regulatory mechanism of volatile compounds in response to N deficiency is not well understood, especially in cucumber, which consumes excessive N during growth. In this study, the major volatile compounds
[...] Read more.
Nitrogen (N) is an important macronutrient for plant growth and development, but the regulatory mechanism of volatile compounds in response to N deficiency is not well understood, especially in cucumber, which consumes excessive N during growth. In this study, the major volatile compounds from cucumber leaves subjected to N deficiency were analyzed by GC-MS. A total of 24 volatile components were identified including 15 aldehydes, two ketones, two alkenes, and five other volatile compounds in 9930 leaves. Principal component analysis using volatile compounds from cucumber leaves provided good separation between N-sufficient and N-deficient treatments. The main volatiles in cucumber leaves were found to be C6 and C9 aldehydes, especially (E)-2-hexanal and (E,Z)-2,6-nonadienal. (E)-2-hexanal belonged to the C6 aldehyde and was the most abundant compound, whereas (E,Z)-2,6-nonadienal was the chief component of C9 aldehydes. During N-deficient treatment, short-chain volatile content was significantly improved at 5 day, other volatiles displayed significant reduction or no significantly changes in all sampling points. Improvement of short-chain volatiles was confirmed in the six other inbred lines at 5 day after N-deficient treatments. The expression analysis of 12 cucumber LOX genes and two HPL genes revealed that CsLOX19, CsLOX20, and CsLOX22 had common up-regulated expression patterns in response to N-deficient stress in most inbred lines; meanwhile, most sample points of CsHPL1 also had significant up-regulated expression patterns. This research focused on the relationship between volatiles in cucumber and different nitrogen environments to provide valuable insight into the effect of cultivation and management of the quality of cucumber and contributes to further research on volatile metabolism in cucumber. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Molecular Botany)
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Open AccessArticle Pine Defensive Monoterpene α-Pinene Influences the Feeding Behavior of Dendroctonus valens and Its Gut Bacterial Community Structure
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1734; doi:10.3390/ijms17111734
Received: 30 June 2016 / Revised: 29 September 2016 / Accepted: 11 October 2016 / Published: 1 November 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (3055 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The exposure to plant defense chemicals has negative effects on insect feeding activity and modifies insect gut microbial community composition. Dendroctonus valens is a very destructive forest pest in China, and harbors a large diversity and abundance of gut microorganisms. Host pine defensive
[...] Read more.
The exposure to plant defense chemicals has negative effects on insect feeding activity and modifies insect gut microbial community composition. Dendroctonus valens is a very destructive forest pest in China, and harbors a large diversity and abundance of gut microorganisms. Host pine defensive chemicals can protect the pines from attack by the holobiont. In this study, boring length of D. valens feeding on 0 mg/g α-pinene and 9 mg/g α-pinene concentration in phloem media for 6 and 48 h were recorded, and their gut bacterial communities were analyzed in parallel. Nine milligram per gram α-pinene concentration significantly inhibited boring length of D. valens and altered its gut microbial community structure after 6 h. The inhibition of boring length from 9 mg/g α-pinene in diets ceased after 48 h. No significant differences of the bacterial communities were observed between the beetles in 0 and 9 mg/g α-pinene concentration in phloem media after 48 h. Our results showed that the inhibition of the feeding behavior of D. valens and the disturbance to its gut bacterial communities in 9 mg/g α-pinene concentration in phloem media after 6 h were eliminated after 48 h. The resilience of gut bacterial community of D. valens may help the beetle catabolize pine defense chemical. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant-Insect Interactions)
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Open AccessArticle Impact of SNPs on Protein Phosphorylation Status in Rice (Oryza sativa L.)
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1738; doi:10.3390/ijms17111738
Received: 26 July 2016 / Revised: 4 October 2016 / Accepted: 11 October 2016 / Published: 11 November 2016
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Abstract
Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are widely used in functional genomics and genetics research work. The high-quality sequence of rice genome has provided a genome-wide SNP and proteome resource. However, the impact of SNPs on protein phosphorylation status in rice is not fully understood.
[...] Read more.
Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are widely used in functional genomics and genetics research work. The high-quality sequence of rice genome has provided a genome-wide SNP and proteome resource. However, the impact of SNPs on protein phosphorylation status in rice is not fully understood. In this paper, we firstly updated rice SNP resource based on the new rice genome Ver. 7.0, then systematically analyzed the potential impact of Non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) on the protein phosphorylation status. There were 3,897,312 SNPs in Ver. 7.0 rice genome, among which 9.9% was nsSNPs. Whilst, a total 2,508,261 phosphorylated sites were predicted in rice proteome. Interestingly, we observed that 150,197 (39.1%) nsSNPs could influence protein phosphorylation status, among which 52.2% might induce changes of protein kinase (PK) types for adjacent phosphorylation sites. We constructed a database, SNP_rice, to deposit the updated rice SNP resource and phosSNPs information. It was freely available to academic researchers at http://bioinformatics.fafu.edu.cn. As a case study, we detected five nsSNPs that potentially influenced heterotrimeric G proteins phosphorylation status in rice, indicating that genetic polymorphisms showed impact on the signal transduction by influencing the phosphorylation status of heterotrimeric G proteins. The results in this work could be a useful resource for future experimental identification and provide interesting information for better rice breeding. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Molecular Botany)
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Open AccessArticle Deletion of Pr130 Interrupts Cardiac Development in Zebrafish
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1746; doi:10.3390/ijms17111746
Received: 20 August 2016 / Revised: 10 October 2016 / Accepted: 13 October 2016 / Published: 11 November 2016
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Abstract
Protein phosphatase 2 regulatory subunit B, alpha (PPP2R3A), a regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), is a major serine/threonine phosphatase that regulates crucial function in development and growth. Previous research has implied that PPP2R3A was involved in heart failure, and
[...] Read more.
Protein phosphatase 2 regulatory subunit B, alpha (PPP2R3A), a regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), is a major serine/threonine phosphatase that regulates crucial function in development and growth. Previous research has implied that PPP2R3A was involved in heart failure, and PR130, the largest transcription of PPP2R3A, functioning in the calcium release of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), plays an important role in the excitation-contraction (EC) coupling. To obtain a better understanding of PR130 functions in myocardium and cardiac development, two pr130-deletion zebrafish lines were generated using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated proteins (Cas) system. Pr130-knockout zebrafish exhibited cardiac looping defects and decreased cardiac function (decreased fractional area and fractional shortening). Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining demonstrated reduced cardiomyocytes. Subsequent transmission electron microscopy revealed that the bright and dark bands were narrowed and blurred, the Z- and M-lines were fogged, and the gaps between longitudinal myocardial fibers were increased. Additionally, increased apoptosis was observed in cardiomyocyte in pr130-knockout zebrafish compared to wild-type (WT). Taken together, our results suggest that pr130 is required for normal myocardium formation and efficient cardiac contractile function. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Molecular Pathology, Diagnostics, and Therapeutics)
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Open AccessArticle Integrated Computational Approach for Virtual Hit Identification against Ebola Viral Proteins VP35 and VP40
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1748; doi:10.3390/ijms17111748
Received: 28 July 2016 / Revised: 18 September 2016 / Accepted: 22 September 2016 / Published: 26 October 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (11195 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The Ebola virus (EBOV) has been recognised for nearly 40 years, with the most recent EBOV outbreak being in West Africa, where it created a humanitarian crisis. Mortalities reported up to 30 March 2016 totalled 11,307. However, up until now, EBOV drugs have
[...] Read more.
The Ebola virus (EBOV) has been recognised for nearly 40 years, with the most recent EBOV outbreak being in West Africa, where it created a humanitarian crisis. Mortalities reported up to 30 March 2016 totalled 11,307. However, up until now, EBOV drugs have been far from achieving regulatory (FDA) approval. It is therefore essential to identify parent compounds that have the potential to be developed into effective drugs. Studies on Ebola viral proteins have shown that some can elicit an immunological response in mice, and these are now considered essential components of a vaccine designed to protect against Ebola haemorrhagic fever. The current study focuses on chemoinformatic approaches to identify virtual hits against Ebola viral proteins (VP35 and VP40), including protein binding site prediction, drug-likeness, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties, metabolic site prediction, and molecular docking. Retrospective validation was performed using a database of non-active compounds, and early enrichment of EBOV actives at different false positive rates was calculated. Homology modelling and subsequent superimposition of binding site residues on other strains of EBOV were carried out to check residual conformations, and hence to confirm the efficacy of potential compounds. As a mechanism for artefactual inhibition of proteins through non-specific compounds, virtual hits were assessed for their aggregator potential compared with previously reported aggregators. These systematic studies have indicated that a few compounds may be effective inhibitors of EBOV replication and therefore might have the potential to be developed as anti-EBOV drugs after subsequent testing and validation in experiments in vivo. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection Proteins and Protein-Ligand Interactions)
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Open AccessArticle Study on Dicyandiamide-Imprinted Polymers with Computer-Aided Design
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1750; doi:10.3390/ijms17111750
Received: 31 August 2016 / Revised: 13 October 2016 / Accepted: 13 October 2016 / Published: 26 October 2016
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Abstract
With the aid of theoretical calculations, a series of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) were designed and prepared for the recognition of dicyandiamide (DCD) via precipitation polymerization using acetonitrile as the solvent at 333 K. On the basis of the long-range correction method of
[...] Read more.
With the aid of theoretical calculations, a series of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) were designed and prepared for the recognition of dicyandiamide (DCD) via precipitation polymerization using acetonitrile as the solvent at 333 K. On the basis of the long-range correction method of M062X/6-31G(d,p), we simulated the bonding sites, bonding situations, binding energies, imprinted molar ratios, and the mechanisms of interaction between DCD and the functional monomers. Among acrylamide (AM), N,N’-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA), itaconic acid (IA), and methacrylic acid (MAA), MAA was confirmed as the best functional monomer, because the strongest interaction (the maximum number of hydrogen bonds and the lowest binding energy) occurs between DCD and MAA, when the optimal molar ratios for DCD to the functional monomers were used, respectively. Additionally, pentaerythritol triacrylate (PETA) was confirmed to be the best cross-linker among divinylbenzene (DVB), ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA), trimethylolpropane trimethylacrylate (TRIM), and PETA. This is due to the facts that the weakest interaction (the highest binding energy) occurs between PETA and DCD, and the strongest interaction (the lowest binding energy) occurs between PETA and MAA. Depending on the results of theoretical calculations, a series of MIPs were prepared. Among them, the ones prepared using DCD, MAA, and PETA as the template, the functional monomer, and the cross-linker, respectively, exhibited the highest adsorption capacity for DCD. The apparent maximum absorption quantity of DCD on the MIP was 17.45 mg/g. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Molecular Recognition)
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Open AccessArticle Biophysical Properties and Motility of Human Mature Dendritic Cells Deteriorated by Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor through Cytoskeleton Remodeling
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1756; doi:10.3390/ijms17111756
Received: 6 July 2016 / Revised: 6 October 2016 / Accepted: 11 October 2016 / Published: 31 October 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (4156 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Dendritic cells (DCs), the most potent antigen-presenting cells, play a central role in the initiation, regulation, and maintenance of the immune responses. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is one of the important cytokines in the tumor microenvironment (TME) and can inhibit the differentiation
[...] Read more.
Dendritic cells (DCs), the most potent antigen-presenting cells, play a central role in the initiation, regulation, and maintenance of the immune responses. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is one of the important cytokines in the tumor microenvironment (TME) and can inhibit the differentiation and functional maturation of DCs. To elucidate the potential mechanisms of DC dysfunction induced by VEGF, the effects of VEGF on the biophysical characteristics and motility of human mature DCs (mDCs) were investigated. The results showed that VEGF had a negative influence on the biophysical properties, including electrophoretic mobility, osmotic fragility, viscoelasticity, and transmigration. Further cytoskeleton structure analysis by confocal microscope and gene expression profile analyses by gene microarray and real-time PCR indicated that the abnormal remodeling of F-actin cytoskeleton may be the main reason for the deterioration of biophysical properties, motility, and stimulatory capability of VEGF-treated mDCs. This is significant for understanding the biological behavior of DCs and the immune escape mechanism of tumors. Simultaneously, the therapeutic efficacies may be improved by blocking the signaling pathway of VEGF in an appropriate manner before the deployment of DC-based vaccinations against tumors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Biochemistry, Molecular and Cellular Biology)
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Open AccessArticle Exogenous Melatonin Improves Plant Iron Deficiency Tolerance via Increased Accumulation of Polyamine-Mediated Nitric Oxide
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1777; doi:10.3390/ijms17111777
Received: 10 September 2016 / Revised: 19 October 2016 / Accepted: 20 October 2016 / Published: 25 October 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (15640 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Melatonin has recently been demonstrated to play important roles in the regulation of plant growth, development, and abiotic and biotic stress responses. However, the possible involvement of melatonin in Fe deficiency responses and the underlying mechanisms remained elusive in Arabidopsis thaliana. In
[...] Read more.
Melatonin has recently been demonstrated to play important roles in the regulation of plant growth, development, and abiotic and biotic stress responses. However, the possible involvement of melatonin in Fe deficiency responses and the underlying mechanisms remained elusive in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, Fe deficiency quickly induced melatonin synthesis in Arabidopsis plants. Exogenous melatonin significantly increased the soluble Fe content of shoots and roots, and decreased the levels of root cell wall Fe bound to pectin and hemicellulose, thus alleviating Fe deficiency-induced chlorosis. Intriguingly, melatonin treatments induced a significant increase of nitric oxide (NO) accumulation in roots of Fe-deficient plants, but not in those of polyamine-deficient (adc2-1 and d-arginine-treated) plants. Moreover, the melatonin-alleviated leaf chlorosis was blocked in the polyamine- and NO-deficient (nia1nia2noa1 and c-PTIO-treated) plants, and the melatonin-induced Fe remobilization was largely inhibited. In addition, the expression of some Fe acquisition-related genes, including FIT1, FRO2, and IRT1 were significantly up-regulated by melatonin treatments, whereas the enhanced expression of these genes was obviously suppressed in the polyamine- and NO-deficient plants. Collectively, our results provide evidence to support the view that melatonin can increase the tolerance of plants to Fe deficiency in a process dependent on the polyamine-induced NO production under Fe-deficient conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Molecular Botany)
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Open AccessArticle iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Potentiated and Dormant Antler Stem Cells
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1778; doi:10.3390/ijms17111778
Received: 9 August 2016 / Revised: 8 October 2016 / Accepted: 16 October 2016 / Published: 25 October 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (5434 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
As the only known organ that can completely regenerate in mammals, deer antler is of real significance in the field of regenerative medicine. Recent studies have shown that the regenerative capacity of the antlers comes from the pedicle periosteum and the cells resident
[...] Read more.
As the only known organ that can completely regenerate in mammals, deer antler is of real significance in the field of regenerative medicine. Recent studies have shown that the regenerative capacity of the antlers comes from the pedicle periosteum and the cells resident in the periosteum possess the attributes of stem cells. Currently, the molecular mechanism of antler regeneration remains unclear. In the present study, we compared the potentiated and dormant antler stem cells using isobaric tags for the relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) labeling of the peptides, coupled with two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to compare the proteome profiles. Proteins were identified by searching against the NCBI nr database and our own Cervine transcriptome database, and bioinformatics analysis was conducted to identify the differentially expressed proteins. Based on this searching strategy, we identified 169 differentially expressed proteins in total, consisting of 70 up- and 99 down-regulated in the potentiated vs. dormant antler stem cells. Reliability of the iTRAQ was confirmed via quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to measure the expression of selected genes. We identified transduction pathways through the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database, such as HIF-1 and PI3K-AKT signaling pathways that play important roles in regulating the regeneration of antlers. In summary, the initiation stage of antler regeneration, a process from dormant to potentiated states in antler stem cells, is regulated by multiple proteins and complicated signal networks. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection Advances in Proteomic Research)
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Open AccessArticle Linear Response Function of Bond-Order
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1779; doi:10.3390/ijms17111779
Received: 31 August 2016 / Revised: 12 October 2016 / Accepted: 14 October 2016 / Published: 25 October 2016
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Abstract
We present the linear response function of bond-orders (LRF-BO) based on a real space integration scheme for molecular systems. As in the case of the LRF of density, the LRF-BO is defined as the response of the bond order of the molecule for
[...] Read more.
We present the linear response function of bond-orders (LRF-BO) based on a real space integration scheme for molecular systems. As in the case of the LRF of density, the LRF-BO is defined as the response of the bond order of the molecule for the virtual perturbation. Our calculations show that the LRF-BO enables us not only to detect inductive and resonating effects of conjugating systems, but also to predict pKa values on substitution groups via linear relationships between the Hammett constants and the LRF-BO values for meta- and para-substituted benzoic acids. More importantly, the LRF-BO values for the O-H bonds strongly depend on the sites to which the virtual perturbation is applied, implying that the LRF-BO values include essential information about reaction mechanism of the acid-dissociation of substituted benzoic acids. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemical Bond and Bonding 2016)
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Open AccessArticle Icariin Promotes Tendon-Bone Healing during Repair of Rotator Cuff Tears: A Biomechanical and Histological Study
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1780; doi:10.3390/ijms17111780
Received: 6 August 2016 / Revised: 14 September 2016 / Accepted: 21 September 2016 / Published: 25 October 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (12599 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
To investigate whether the systematic administration of icariin (ICA) promotes tendon-bone healing after rotator cuff reconstruction in vivo, a total of 64 male Sprague Dawley rats were used in a rotator cuff injury model and underwent rotator cuff reconstruction (bone tunnel suture fixation).
[...] Read more.
To investigate whether the systematic administration of icariin (ICA) promotes tendon-bone healing after rotator cuff reconstruction in vivo, a total of 64 male Sprague Dawley rats were used in a rotator cuff injury model and underwent rotator cuff reconstruction (bone tunnel suture fixation). Rats from the ICA group (n = 32) were gavage-fed daily with ICA at 0.125 mg/g, while rats in the control group (n = 32) received saline only. Micro-computed tomography, biomechanical tests, serum ELISA (calcium; Ca, alkaline phosphatase; AP, osteocalcin; OCN) and histological examinations (Safranin O and Fast Green staining, type I, II and III collagen (Col1, Col2, and Col3), CD31, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)) were analyzed two and four weeks after surgery. In the ICA group, the serum levels of AP and OCN were higher than in the control group. More Col1-, Col2-, CD31-, and VEGF-positive cells, together with a greater degree of osteogenesis, were detected in the ICA group compared with the control group. During mechanical testing, the ICA group showed a significantly higher ultimate failure load than the control group at both two and four weeks. Our results indicate that the systematic administration of ICA could promote angiogenesis and tendon-bone healing after rotator cuff reconstruction, with superior mechanical strength compared with the controls. Treatment for rotator cuff injury using systematically-administered ICA could be a promising strategy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Translational Molecular Medicine & Molecular Drug Discovery)
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Open AccessArticle Non-SMC Element 2 (NSMCE2) of the SMC5/6 Complex Helps to Resolve Topological Stress
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1782; doi:10.3390/ijms17111782
Received: 8 July 2016 / Revised: 14 September 2016 / Accepted: 20 October 2016 / Published: 26 October 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (4001 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) protein complexes shape and regulate the structure and dynamics of chromatin, thereby controlling many chromosome-based processes such as cell cycle progression, differentiation, gene transcription and DNA repair. The SMC5/6 complex is previously described to promote DNA double-strand
[...] Read more.
The structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) protein complexes shape and regulate the structure and dynamics of chromatin, thereby controlling many chromosome-based processes such as cell cycle progression, differentiation, gene transcription and DNA repair. The SMC5/6 complex is previously described to promote DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) repair by sister chromatid recombination, and found to be essential for resolving recombination intermediates during meiotic recombination. Moreover, in budding yeast, SMC5/6 provides structural organization and topological stress relief during replication in mitotically dividing cells. Despite the essential nature of the SMC5/6 complex, the versatile mechanisms by which SMC5/6 functions and its molecular regulation in mammalian cells remain poorly understood. By using a human osteosarcoma cell line (U2OS), we show that after the CRISPR-Cas9-mediated removal of the SMC5/6 subunit NSMCE2, treatment with the topoisomerase II inhibitor etoposide triggered an increased sensitivity in cells lacking NSMCE2. In contrast, NSMCE2 appeared not essential for a proper DNA damage response or cell survival after DSB induction by ionizing irradiation (IR). Interestingly, by way of immunoprecipitations (IPs) and mass spectrometry, we found that the SMC5/6 complex physically interacts with the DNA topoisomerase II α (TOP2A). We therefore propose that the SMC5/6 complex functions in resolving TOP2A-mediated DSB-repair intermediates generated during replication. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Biochemistry, Molecular and Cellular Biology)
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Open AccessArticle Circadian Rhythm Shapes the Gut Microbiota Affecting Host Radiosensitivity
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1786; doi:10.3390/ijms17111786
Received: 13 August 2016 / Revised: 12 October 2016 / Accepted: 19 October 2016 / Published: 26 October 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1688 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Modern lifestyles, such as shift work, nocturnal social activities, and jet lag, disturb the circadian rhythm. The interaction between mammals and the co-evolved intestinal microbiota modulates host physiopathological processes. Radiotherapy is a cornerstone of modern management of malignancies; however, it was previously unknown
[...] Read more.
Modern lifestyles, such as shift work, nocturnal social activities, and jet lag, disturb the circadian rhythm. The interaction between mammals and the co-evolved intestinal microbiota modulates host physiopathological processes. Radiotherapy is a cornerstone of modern management of malignancies; however, it was previously unknown whether circadian rhythm disorder impairs prognosis after radiotherapy. To investigate the effect of circadian rhythm on radiotherapy, C57BL/6 mice were housed in different dark/light cycles, and their intestinal bacterial compositions were compared using high throughput sequencing. The survival rate, body weight, and food intake of mice in diverse cohorts were measured following irradiation exposure. Finally, the enteric bacterial composition of irradiated mice that experienced different dark/light cycles was assessed using 16S RNA sequencing. Intriguingly, mice housed in aberrant light cycles harbored a reduction of observed intestinal bacterial species and shifts of gut bacterial composition compared with those of the mice kept under 12 h dark/12 h light cycles, resulting in a decrease of host radioresistance. Moreover, the alteration of enteric bacterial composition of mice in different groups was dissimilar. Our findings provide novel insights into the effects of biological clocks on the gut bacterial composition, and underpin that the circadian rhythm influences the prognosis of patients after radiotherapy in a preclinical setting. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Circadian Rhythms)
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Open AccessArticle Cytotoxicity of 11-epi-Sinulariolide Acetate Isolated from Cultured Soft Corals on HA22T Cells through the Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Pathway and Mitochondrial Dysfunction
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1787; doi:10.3390/ijms17111787
Received: 2 May 2016 / Revised: 29 August 2016 / Accepted: 12 October 2016 / Published: 27 October 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (5652 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Natural compounds from soft corals have been increasingly used for their antitumor therapeutic properties. This study examined 11-epi-sinulariolide acetate (11-epi-SA), an active compound isolated from the cultured soft coral Sinularia flexibilis, to determine its potential antitumor effect on
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Natural compounds from soft corals have been increasingly used for their antitumor therapeutic properties. This study examined 11-epi-sinulariolide acetate (11-epi-SA), an active compound isolated from the cultured soft coral Sinularia flexibilis, to determine its potential antitumor effect on four hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines. Cell viability was investigated using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, and the results demonstrated that 11-epi-SA treatment showed more cytotoxic effect toward HA22T cells. Protein profiling of the 11-epi-SA-treated HA22T cells revealed substantial protein alterations associated with stress response and protein synthesis and folding, suggesting that the mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) play roles in 11-epi-SA-initiated apoptosis. Moreover, 11-epi-SA activated caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death, suggesting that mitochondria-related apoptosis genes were involved in programmed cell death. The unfolded protein response signaling pathway-related proteins were also activated on 11-epi-SA treatment, and these changes were accompanied by the upregulated expression of growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible protein (GADD153) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) homologous protein (CHOP), the genes encoding transcription factors associated with growth arrest and apoptosis under prolonged ER stress. Two inhibitors, namely salubrinal (Sal) and SP600125, partially abrogated 11-epi-SA-related cell death, implying that the protein kinase R (PKR)-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK)–activating transcription factor (ATF) 6–CHOP or the inositol-requiring enzyme 1 alpha (IRE1α)–c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)–cJun signal pathway was activated after 11-epi-SA treatment. In general, these results suggest that 11-epi-SA exerts cytotoxic effects on HA22T cells through mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress cell death pathways. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Modulators of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress 2016)
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Open AccessArticle Predicting Protein–Protein Interaction Sites Using Sequence Descriptors and Site Propensity of Neighboring Amino Acids
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1788; doi:10.3390/ijms17111788
Received: 8 September 2016 / Revised: 14 October 2016 / Accepted: 18 October 2016 / Published: 26 October 2016
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Abstract
Information about the interface sites of Protein–Protein Interactions (PPIs) is useful for many biological research works. However, despite the advancement of experimental techniques, the identification of PPI sites still remains as a challenging task. Using a statistical learning technique, we proposed a computational
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Information about the interface sites of Protein–Protein Interactions (PPIs) is useful for many biological research works. However, despite the advancement of experimental techniques, the identification of PPI sites still remains as a challenging task. Using a statistical learning technique, we proposed a computational tool for predicting PPI interaction sites. As an alternative to similar approaches requiring structural information, the proposed method takes all of the input from protein sequences. In addition to typical sequence features, our method takes into consideration that interaction sites are not randomly distributed over the protein sequence. We characterized this positional preference using protein complexes with known structures, proposed a numerical index to estimate the propensity and then incorporated the index into a learning system. The resulting predictor, without using structural information, yields an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.675, recall of 0.597, precision of 0.311 and accuracy of 0.583 on a ten-fold cross-validation experiment. This performance is comparable to the previous approach in which structural information was used. Upon introducing the B-factor data to our predictor, we demonstrated that the AUC can be further improved to 0.750. The tool is accessible at http://bsaltools.ym.edu.tw/predppis. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection Proteins and Protein-Ligand Interactions)
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Open AccessArticle Tomato Juice Consumption Modifies the Urinary Peptide Profile in Sprague-Dawley Rats with Induced Hepatic Steatosis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1789; doi:10.3390/ijms17111789
Received: 31 July 2016 / Revised: 29 September 2016 / Accepted: 11 October 2016 / Published: 26 October 2016
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Abstract
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disorder in Western countries, with a high prevalence, and has been shown to increase the risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), etc. Tomato products contain several natural antioxidants, including lycopene—which has
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Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disorder in Western countries, with a high prevalence, and has been shown to increase the risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), etc. Tomato products contain several natural antioxidants, including lycopene—which has displayed a preventive effect on the development of steatosis and CVD. Accordingly, the aim of the present work was to evaluate the effect of tomato juice consumption on the urinary peptide profile in rats with NAFLD induced by an atherogenic diet and to identify potential peptide biomarkers for diagnosis. Urine samples, collected weekly for four weeks, were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis (CE) coupled to a mass spectrometer (MS). A partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was carried out to explore the association between differential peptides and treatments. Among the 888 peptides initially identified, a total of 55 were obtained as potential biomarkers. Rats with steatosis after tomato juice intake showed a profile intermediate between that of healthy rats and that of rats with induced hepatic steatosis. Accordingly, tomato products could be considered as a dietary strategy for the impairment of NAFLD, although further research should be carried out to develop a specific biomarkers panel for NAFLD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Bioactives and Nutraceuticals)
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Open AccessArticle Preparation of Pure and Stable Chitosan Nanofibers by Electrospinning in the Presence of Poly(ethylene oxide)
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1790; doi:10.3390/ijms17111790
Received: 22 September 2016 / Revised: 18 October 2016 / Accepted: 19 October 2016 / Published: 26 October 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (3876 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Electrospinning was employed to obtain chitosan nanofibers from blends of chitosans (CS) and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO). Blends of chitosan (MW (weight-average molecular weight) = 102 kg/mol) and PEO (M (molecular weight) = 1000 kg/mol) were selected to optimize the electrospinning process
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Electrospinning was employed to obtain chitosan nanofibers from blends of chitosans (CS) and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO). Blends of chitosan (MW (weight-average molecular weight) = 102 kg/mol) and PEO (M (molecular weight) = 1000 kg/mol) were selected to optimize the electrospinning process parameters. The PEO powder was solubilized into chitosan solution at different weight ratios in 0.5 M acetic acid. The physicochemical changes of the nanofibers were determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), swelling capacity, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. For stabilization, the produced nanofibers were neutralized with K2CO3 in water or 70% ethanol/30% water as solvent. Subsequently, repeated washings with pure water were performed to extract PEO, potassium acetate and carbonate salts formed in the course of chitosan nanofiber purification. The increase of PEO content in the blend from 20 to 40 w% exhibited bead-free fibers with average diameters 85 ± 19 and 147 ± 28 nm, respectively. Their NMR analysis proved that PEO and the salts were nearly completely removed from the nanostructure of chitosan, demonstrating that the adopted strategy is successful for producing pure chitosan nanofibers. In addition, the nanofibers obtained after neutralization in ethanol-aqueous solution has better structural stability, at least for six months in aqueous solutions (phosphate buffer (PBS) or water). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chitins 2016)
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Open AccessArticle Preoperative 3D FSE T1-Weighted MR Plaque Imaging for Severely Stenotic Cervical ICA: Accuracy of Predicting Emboli during Carotid Endarterectomy
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1791; doi:10.3390/ijms17111791
Received: 27 July 2016 / Revised: 9 October 2016 / Accepted: 17 October 2016 / Published: 27 October 2016
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Abstract
The aim of the present study was to determine whether preoperative three-dimensional (3D) fast spin-echo (FSE) T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) plaque imaging for severely stenotic cervical carotid arteries could accurately predict the development of artery-to-artery emboli during exposure of the carotid arteries in
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The aim of the present study was to determine whether preoperative three-dimensional (3D) fast spin-echo (FSE) T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) plaque imaging for severely stenotic cervical carotid arteries could accurately predict the development of artery-to-artery emboli during exposure of the carotid arteries in carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Seventy-five patients underwent preoperative MR plaque imaging and CEA under transcranial Doppler ultrasonography of the ipsilateral middle cerebral artery. On reformatted axial MR image slices showing the maximum plaque occupation rate (POR) and maximum plaque intensity for each patient, the contrast ratio (CR) was calculated by dividing the internal carotid artery plaque signal intensity by the sternocleidomastoid muscle signal intensity. For all patients, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC)—used to discriminate between the presence and absence of microembolic signals—was significantly greater for the CR on the axial image with maximum plaque intensity (CRmax intensity) (0.941) than for that with the maximum POR (0.885) (p < 0.05). For 32 patients in whom both the maximum POR and the maximum plaque density were identified, the AUCs for the CR were 1.000. Preoperative 3D FSE T1-weighted MR plaque imaging accurately predicts the development of artery-to-artery emboli during exposure of the carotid arteries in CEA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atherosclerosis and Vascular Imaging 2016) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessArticle Tocotrienol Nanoemulsion Platform of Curcumin Elicit Elevated Apoptosis and Augmentation of Anticancer Efficacy against Breast and Ovarian Carcinomas
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1792; doi:10.3390/ijms17111792
Received: 4 September 2016 / Revised: 19 October 2016 / Accepted: 20 October 2016 / Published: 26 October 2016
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Abstract
Vitamin E (VE) tocotrienols (T3), recognized for their cancer-specific anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities, have been previously fabricated into bio-active nanoemulsion (NE) formulations. Here, our viscosity-adapted δ-T3 NE platform was developed to additionally incorporate curcumin (CUR), which is known for its potent suppression of
[...] Read more.
Vitamin E (VE) tocotrienols (T3), recognized for their cancer-specific anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities, have been previously fabricated into bio-active nanoemulsion (NE) formulations. Here, our viscosity-adapted δ-T3 NE platform was developed to additionally incorporate curcumin (CUR), which is known for its potent suppression of signaling pathways involved in malignant cell growth, survival and metastasis. Thanks to efficient 70:30 wt % surfactant mix of Lutrol F-127:VE-TPGS, in conjunction with optimal CUR loading, a prototype CUR in δ-T3 NE was successfully prepared. Model CUR/δ-T3 NE demonstrated excellent nano-scale aspects (mean particle size = 261 nm, PDI = 0.27, and ζ-potential = −35 mV), pharmaceutical stability, and controlled release properties. Suitability for systemic administration was also verified via standardized in vitro biocompatibility and hemocompatibility assays. In two human cancer cells (MCF-7 and OVCAR-8), our CUR/δ-T3 NE prominently suppressed constitutive NF-κB activation, and significantly induced apoptosis. Finally, the combined CUR/δ-T3 NE produced superior cytotoxicity profiles, in concentration- and time-dependent manners (p ≤ 0.05), at least three to four folds lower IC50 than in closest CUR control. The strong synergism, estimated in both cultured carcinomas, revealed the augmented therapeutic efficacy of our CUR/δ-T3 NE combined platform, supporting its strong potential towards pharmaceutical development for cancer therapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tocopherols and Tocotrienols: Metabolism and Properties)
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Open AccessArticle Comparative Proteomic and Physiological Analysis Reveals the Variation Mechanisms of Leaf Coloration and Carbon Fixation in a Xantha Mutant of Ginkgo biloba L.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1794; doi:10.3390/ijms17111794
Received: 10 August 2016 / Revised: 16 October 2016 / Accepted: 18 October 2016 / Published: 27 October 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (3849 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Yellow-green leaf mutants are common in higher plants, and these non-lethal chlorophyll-deficient mutants are ideal materials for research on photosynthesis and plant development. A novel xantha mutant of Ginkgo biloba displaying yellow-colour leaves (YL) and green-colour leaves (GL) was identified in this study.
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Yellow-green leaf mutants are common in higher plants, and these non-lethal chlorophyll-deficient mutants are ideal materials for research on photosynthesis and plant development. A novel xantha mutant of Ginkgo biloba displaying yellow-colour leaves (YL) and green-colour leaves (GL) was identified in this study. The chlorophyll content of YL was remarkably lower than that in GL. The chloroplast ultrastructure revealed that YL had less dense thylakoid lamellae, a looser structure and fewer starch grains than GL. Analysis of the photosynthetic characteristics revealed that YL had decreased photosynthetic activity with significantly high nonphotochemical quenching. To explain these phenomena, we analysed the proteomic differences in leaves and chloroplasts between YL and GL of ginkgo using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled with MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. In total, 89 differential proteins were successfully identified, 82 of which were assigned functions in nine metabolic pathways and cellular processes. Among them, proteins involved in photosynthesis, carbon fixation in photosynthetic organisms, carbohydrate/energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and protein metabolism were greatly enriched, indicating a good correlation between differentially accumulated proteins and physiological changes in leaves. The identifications of these differentially accumulated proteins indicates the presence of a specific different metabolic network in YL and suggests that YL possess slower chloroplast development, weaker photosynthesis, and a less abundant energy supply than GL. These studies provide insights into the mechanism of molecular regulation of leaf colour variation in YL mutants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Proteomic Research) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessArticle Molecular Dynamic Studies of the Complex Polyethylenimine and Glucose Oxidase
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1796; doi:10.3390/ijms17111796
Received: 29 July 2016 / Revised: 18 October 2016 / Accepted: 20 October 2016 / Published: 27 October 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (5037 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Glucose oxidase (GOx) is an enzyme produced by Aspergillus, Penicillium and other fungi species. It catalyzes the oxidation of β-d-glucose (by the molecular oxygen or other molecules, like quinones, in a higher oxidation state) to form d-glucono-1,5-lactone, which hydrolyses spontaneously
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Glucose oxidase (GOx) is an enzyme produced by Aspergillus, Penicillium and other fungi species. It catalyzes the oxidation of β-d-glucose (by the molecular oxygen or other molecules, like quinones, in a higher oxidation state) to form d-glucono-1,5-lactone, which hydrolyses spontaneously to produce gluconic acid. A coproduct of this enzymatic reaction is hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). GOx has found several commercial applications in chemical and pharmaceutical industries including novel biosensors that use the immobilized enzyme on different nanomaterials and/or polymers such as polyethylenimine (PEI). The problem of GOx immobilization on PEI is retaining the enzyme native activity despite its immobilization onto the polymer surface. Therefore, the molecular dynamic (MD) study of the PEI ligand (C14N8_07_B22) and the GOx enzyme (3QVR) was performed to examine the final complex PEI-GOx stabilization and the affinity of the PEI ligand to the docking sites of the GOx enzyme. The docking procedure showed two places/regions of major interaction of the protein with the polymer PEI: (LIG1) of −5.8 kcal/mol and (LIG2) of −4.5 kcal/mol located inside the enzyme and on its surface, respectively. The values of enthalpy for the PEI-enzyme complex, located inside of the protein (LIG1) and on its surface (LIG2) were computed. Docking also discovered domains of the GOx protein that exhibit no interactions with the ligand or have even repulsive characteristics. The structural data clearly indicate some differences in the ligand PEI behavior bound at the two places/regions of glucose oxidase. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Computational Eco, Bio, and Pharmaco-Toxicity 2016)
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Open AccessArticle The Activating NKG2C Receptor Is Significantly Reduced in NK Cells after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients with Severe Graft-versus-Host Disease
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1797; doi:10.3390/ijms17111797
Received: 31 July 2016 / Revised: 18 October 2016 / Accepted: 20 October 2016 / Published: 27 October 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1252 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Natural killer (NK) cells play a central role in the innate immune system. In allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT), alloreactive NK cells derived by the graft are discussed to mediate the elimination of leukemic cells and dendritic cells in the patient and thereby
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Natural killer (NK) cells play a central role in the innate immune system. In allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT), alloreactive NK cells derived by the graft are discussed to mediate the elimination of leukemic cells and dendritic cells in the patient and thereby to reduce the risk for leukemic relapses and graft-versus-host reactions. The alloreactivity of NK cells is determined by various receptors including the activating CD94/NKG2C and the inhibitory CD94/NKG2A receptors, which both recognize the non-classical human leukocyte antigen E (HLA-E). Here we analyze the contribution of these receptors to NK cell alloreactivity in 26 patients over the course of the first year after alloSCT due to acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome and T cell Non-Hodgkin-Lymphoma. Our results show that NK cells expressing the activating CD94/NKG2C receptor are significantly reduced in patients after alloSCT with severe acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). Moreover, the ratio of CD94/NKG2C to CD94/NKG2A was reduced in patients with severe acute and chronic GvHD after receiving an HLA-mismatched graft. Collectively, these results provide evidence for the first time that CD94/NKG2C is involved in GvHD prevention. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Cell Transplantation)
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Open AccessArticle Effects of Ganodermanondiol, a New Melanogenesis Inhibitor from the Medicinal Mushroom Ganoderma lucidum
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1798; doi:10.3390/ijms17111798
Received: 1 October 2016 / Revised: 21 October 2016 / Accepted: 25 October 2016 / Published: 27 October 2016
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Abstract
Ganoderma lucidum, a species of the Basidiomycetes class, has been attracting international attention owing to its wide variety of biological activities and great potential as an ingredient in skin care cosmetics including “skin-whitening” products. However, there is little information available on its
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Ganoderma lucidum, a species of the Basidiomycetes class, has been attracting international attention owing to its wide variety of biological activities and great potential as an ingredient in skin care cosmetics including “skin-whitening” products. However, there is little information available on its inhibitory effect against tyrosinase activity. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to investigate the chemical composition of G. lucidum and its inhibitory effects on melanogenesis. We isolated the active compound from G. lucidum using ethanol extraction and ethyl acetate fractionation. In addition, we assayed its inhibitory effects on tyrosinase activity and melanin biosynthesis in B16F10 melanoma cells. In this study, we identified a bioactive compound, ganodermanondiol, which inhibits the activity and expression of cellular tyrosinase and the expression of tyrosinase-related protein-1 (TRP-1), TRP-2, and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), thereby decreasing melanin production. Furthermore, ganodermanondiol also affected the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent signaling pathway, which are involved in the melanogenesis of B16F10 melanoma cells. The finding that ganodermanondiol from G. lucidum exerts an inhibitory effect on tyrosinase will contribute to the use of this mushroom in the preparation of skin care products in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biochemistry and Mechanisms of Melanogenesis)
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Open AccessArticle miR-92a-3p Exerts Various Effects in Glioma and Glioma Stem-Like Cells Specifically Targeting CDH1/β-Catenin and Notch-1/Akt Signaling Pathways
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1799; doi:10.3390/ijms17111799
Received: 5 September 2016 / Revised: 18 October 2016 / Accepted: 21 October 2016 / Published: 27 October 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (5114 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are implicated in the regulation of tumor progression and stemness of cancer stem-like cells. Recently, miR-92a-3p was reported to be up-regulated in human glioma samples. Nevertheless, the precise role of miR-92a-3p in glioma cells and glioma stem-like cells (GSCs) has not
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MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are implicated in the regulation of tumor progression and stemness of cancer stem-like cells. Recently, miR-92a-3p was reported to be up-regulated in human glioma samples. Nevertheless, the precise role of miR-92a-3p in glioma cells and glioma stem-like cells (GSCs) has not been fully elucidated. It is necessary to clarify the function of miR-92a-3p in glioma and GSCs to develop novel therapeutic approaches for glioma patients. In the present study, we applied methyl-thiazolyl-tetrazolium (MTT) assay and Transwell assay to measure the proliferation rate and metastatic potential of glioma cells. Meanwhile, the self-renewal ability of GSCs was detected by tumor sphere formation assay. The results revealed that down-regulation of miR-92a-3p suppressed the glioma cell malignancy in vitro. Moreover, knockdown of miR-92a-3p led to a reduction of tumorgenesis in vivo. Interestingly, we also observed that up-regulation of miR-92a-3p could inhibit the stemness of GSCs. Subsequent mechanistic investigation indicated that cadherin 1 (CDH1)/β-catenin signaling and Notch-1/Akt signaling were the downstream pathways of miR-92a-3p in glioma cells and GSCs, respectively. These results suggest that miR-92a-3p plays different roles in glioma cells and GSCs through regulating different signaling pathways. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue microRNA Regulation 2017)
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Open AccessArticle Urinary Angiotensinogen Could Be a Prognostic Marker of the Renoprotection of Olmesartan in Metabolic Syndrome Patients
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1800; doi:10.3390/ijms17111800
Received: 22 June 2016 / Revised: 16 August 2016 / Accepted: 19 August 2016 / Published: 27 October 2016
PDF Full-text (1841 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
This study was performed to demonstrate urinary angiotensinogen as a potential prognostic marker of the albuminuria reduction effects of olmesartan in patients with metabolic syndrome. In 24 patients (eight women, 57.88 ± 2.00 years), 5–40 mg/day of olmesartan were given. Urinary concentrations of
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This study was performed to demonstrate urinary angiotensinogen as a potential prognostic marker of the albuminuria reduction effects of olmesartan in patients with metabolic syndrome. In 24 patients (eight women, 57.88 ± 2.00 years), 5–40 mg/day of olmesartan were given. Urinary concentrations of albumin and angiotensinogen (normalized by urinary concentrations of creatinine) and plasma renin activity were measured before and after the 12- and 24-week marks of olmesartan treatment. Olmesartan treatment increased plasma renin activity and decreased urinary albumin and urinary angiotensinogen significantly (p < 0.05). Based on the % change in urinary albumin, patients were divided into two groups, responders (<−50%) and non-responders (≥−50%), and a logistic analysis of urinary angiotensinogen before treatment showed the area under the curve as 0.694. When the cutoff value of urinary angiotensinogen before the treatment of 13.9 µg/g Cr was used, the maximum Youden index (0.500, specificity: 11/12 = 91.7% and sensitivity: 7/12 = 58.3%) was obtained. When all patients were re-divided into two groups, those with higher values of urinary angiotensinogen before the treatment (Group H, n = 16) and those with lower values, Group H showed significantly decreased urinary albumin (p < 0.05). Therefore, urinary angiotensinogen could be a prognostic marker of the albuminuria reduction effects of olmesartan in patients with metabolic syndrome. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease 2017)
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Open AccessArticle A Clinical Trial about a Food Supplement Containing α-Lipoic Acid on Oxidative Stress Markers in Type 2 Diabetic Patients
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1802; doi:10.3390/ijms17111802
Received: 20 August 2016 / Revised: 2 October 2016 / Accepted: 8 October 2016 / Published: 28 October 2016
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (493 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a food supplement containing α-lipoic acid and of a placebo on glyco-metabolic control and on oxidative stress markers in type 2 diabetics. We randomized 105 diabetics to either a supplementation containing 600
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The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a food supplement containing α-lipoic acid and of a placebo on glyco-metabolic control and on oxidative stress markers in type 2 diabetics. We randomized 105 diabetics to either a supplementation containing 600 mg of α-lipoic acid, 165 mg of L-carnosin, 7.5 mg of zinc, and vitamins of group B, or a placebo, for three months. We evaluated body mass index, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), post-prandial-glucose (PPG), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting plasma insulin (FPI), HOMA-index (HOMA-IR), lipid profile, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), malondialdehyde (MDA). There was a reduction of FPG, PPG, and HbA1c with the food supplement containing α-lipoic acid compared with a baseline, and with the placebo. Concerning lipid profile, we observed a reduction of LDL-C, and Tg with the food supplement, compared with both the baseline, and the placebo. There was a reduction of Hs-CRP with the food supplement containing α-lipoic acid, both compared with the baseline and the placebo. An increase of SOD, and GSH-Px, and a decrease of MDA were reached by the food supplement containing α-lipoic acid, both compared with the baseline and the placebo. We can conclude that the food supplement containing α-lipoic acid, L-carnosin, zinc, and vitamins of group B improved glycemic control, lipid profile, and anti-oxidative stress markers. Full article
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Open AccessArticle The Expression and Clinical Outcome of pCHK2-Thr68 and pCDC25C-Ser216 in Breast Cancer
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1803; doi:10.3390/ijms17111803
Received: 2 July 2016 / Revised: 23 September 2016 / Accepted: 12 October 2016 / Published: 28 October 2016
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Abstract
Checkpoint kinase 2 (CHK2) and cell division cycle 25C (CDC25C) are two proteins involved in the DNA damage response pathway, playing essential roles in maintaining genome integrity. As one of the major hallmarks of abnormal cellular division, genomic instability occurs in most cancers.
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Checkpoint kinase 2 (CHK2) and cell division cycle 25C (CDC25C) are two proteins involved in the DNA damage response pathway, playing essential roles in maintaining genome integrity. As one of the major hallmarks of abnormal cellular division, genomic instability occurs in most cancers. In this study, we identified the functional expression of pCHK2-Thr68 and pCDC25C-Ser216 in breast cancer, as well as its association with breast cancer survival. Tissue microarray analysis using immunohistochemistry was constructed to identify the expression of pCHK2-Thr68 and pCDC25C-Ser216 in 292 female breast cancer patients. The relationship among protein expression, clinicopathological factors (e.g., human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER 2), tumor size, tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) classification), and overall survival of the breast cancer tissues were analyzed using Pearson’s χ-square (χ2) test, Fisher’s exact test, multivariate logistic regression and Kaplan–Meier survival analysis. Significantly higher expressions of pCHK2-Thr68 and pCDC25C-Ser216 were observed in the nucleus of the breast cancer cells compared to the paracancerous tissue (pCHK2-Thr68, 20.38% vs. 0%; pCDC25C-Ser216, 82.26% vs. 24.24%). The expression of pCHK2-Thr68 and pCDC25C-Ser216 in breast cancer showed a positive linear correlation (p = 0.026). High expression of pCHK2-Thr68 was associated with decreased patient survival (p = 0.001), but was not an independent prognostic factor. Our results suggest that pCHK2-Thr68 and pCDC25C-Ser216 play important roles in breast cancer and may be potential treatment targets. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection Advances in Molecular Oncology)
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Open AccessArticle AQP2 Plasma Membrane Diffusion Is Altered by the Degree of AQP2-S256 Phosphorylation
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1804; doi:10.3390/ijms17111804
Received: 19 July 2016 / Revised: 15 September 2016 / Accepted: 22 September 2016 / Published: 28 October 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (2749 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Fine tuning of urine concentration occurs in the renal collecting duct in response to circulating levels of arginine vasopressin (AVP). AVP stimulates intracellular cAMP production, which mediates exocytosis of sub-apical vesicles containing the water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2). Protein Kinase A (PKA) phosphorylates AQP2
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Fine tuning of urine concentration occurs in the renal collecting duct in response to circulating levels of arginine vasopressin (AVP). AVP stimulates intracellular cAMP production, which mediates exocytosis of sub-apical vesicles containing the water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2). Protein Kinase A (PKA) phosphorylates AQP2 on serine-256 (S256), which triggers plasma membrane accumulation of AQP2. This mediates insertion of AQP2 into the apical plasma membrane, increasing water permeability of the collecting duct. AQP2 is a homo-tetramer. When S256 on all four monomers is changed to the phosphomimic aspartic acid (S256D), AQP2-S256D localizes to the plasma membrane and internalization is decreased. In contrast, when S256 is mutated to alanine (S256A) to mimic non-phosphorylated AQP2, AQP2-S256A localizes to intracellular vesicles as well as the plasma membrane, with increased internalization from the plasma membrane. S256 phosphorylation is not necessary for exocytosis and dephosphorylation is not necessary for endocytosis, however, the degree of S256 phosphorylation is hypothesized to regulate the kinetics of AQP2 endocytosis and thus, retention time in the plasma membrane. Using k-space Image Correlation Spectroscopy (kICS), we determined how the number of phosphorylated to non-phosphorylated S256 monomers in the AQP2 tetramer affects diffusion speed of AQP2 in the plasma membrane. When all four monomers mimicked constitutive phosphorylation (AQP2-S256D), diffusion was faster than when all four were non-phosphorylated (AQP2-S256A). AQP2-WT diffused at a speed similar to that of AQP2-S256D. When an average of two or three monomers in the tetramer were constitutively phosphorylated, the average diffusion coefficients were not significantly different to that of AQP2-S256D. However, when only one monomer was phosphorylated, diffusion was slower and similar to AQP2-S256A. Thus, AQP2 with two to four phosphorylated monomers has faster plasma membrane kinetics, than the tetramer which contains just one or no phosphorylated monomers. This difference in diffusion rate may reflect behavior of AQP2 tetramers destined for either plasma membrane retention or endocytosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aquaporin)
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Open AccessArticle Peculiarities of the Super-Folder GFP Folding in a Crowded Milieu
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1805; doi:10.3390/ijms17111805
Received: 26 August 2016 / Revised: 11 October 2016 / Accepted: 20 October 2016 / Published: 28 October 2016
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Abstract
The natural cellular milieu is crowded by large quantities of various biological macromolecules. This complex environment is characterized by a limited amount of unoccupied space, limited amounts of free water, and changed solvent properties. Obviously, such a tightly packed cellular environment is poorly
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The natural cellular milieu is crowded by large quantities of various biological macromolecules. This complex environment is characterized by a limited amount of unoccupied space, limited amounts of free water, and changed solvent properties. Obviously, such a tightly packed cellular environment is poorly mimicked by traditional physiological conditions, where low concentrations of a protein of interest are analyzed in slightly salted aqueous solutions. An alternative is given by the use of a model crowded milieu, where a protein of interest is immersed in a solution containing high concentrations of various polymers that serve as model crowding agents. An expected outcome of the presence of such macromolecular crowding agents is their ability to increase conformational stability of a globular protein due to the excluded volume effects. In line with this hypothesis, the behavior of a query protein should be affected by the hydrodynamic size and concentration of an inert crowder (i.e., an agent that does not interact with the protein), whereas the chemical nature of a macromolecular crowder should not play a role in its ability to modulate conformational properties. In this study, the effects of different crowding agents (polyethylene glycols (PEGs) of various molecular masses (PEG-600, PEG-8000, and PEG-12000), Dextran-70, and Ficoll-70) on the spectral properties and unfolding–refolding processes of the super-folder green fluorescent protein (sfGFP) were investigated. sfGFP is differently affected by different crowders, suggesting that, in addition to the expected excluded volume effects, there are some changes in the solvent properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection Protein Folding)
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Open AccessArticle Different Susceptibilities between Apoe- and Ldlr-Deficient Mice to Inflammation-Associated Colorectal Carcinogenesis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1806; doi:10.3390/ijms17111806
Received: 1 August 2016 / Revised: 21 September 2016 / Accepted: 19 October 2016 / Published: 28 October 2016
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Abstract
Hypercholesterolemia resulting in atherosclerosis is associated with an increased risk of ischemic heart disease and colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the roles of apoliprotein (Apo) E (Apoe) and low-density lipoprotein (Ldl) receptor (Ldlr) in colorectal carcinogenesis have not
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Hypercholesterolemia resulting in atherosclerosis is associated with an increased risk of ischemic heart disease and colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the roles of apoliprotein (Apo) E (Apoe) and low-density lipoprotein (Ldl) receptor (Ldlr) in colorectal carcinogenesis have not yet been investigated. In this study, we examined the susceptibility of Apoe-deficient and Ldlr-deficient mice, which are genetic animal models of atherosclerosis to azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colorectal carcinogenesis. In Experiment 1, male Apoe-deficient (n = 20) and wild type (WT) mice (C57BL/6J, n = 21) were treated with a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of AOM (10 mg/kg body weight) and then given 1.5% DSS in drinking water for seven days. They were maintained up to week 20 and sacrificed for the histopathological examination of colorectal tumors. The mRNA expression of cyclooxygenase (Cox)-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase (Nos2), tumor necrosis factor (Tnf)-α interleukin (Il)-1β, and Il-6 was assayed in the colorectal mucosa. In Experiment 2, male Ldlr-deficient (n = 14) and WT mice (C57BL/6J, n = 10) were given a single i.p. injection of AOM (10 mg/kg body weight) and then given 2% DSS in drinking water for seven days. They were sacrificed at week 20 to evaluate their colorectum histopathologically. In Experiment 1, the multiplicity of CRCs was significantly higher in the Apoe-deficient mice (2.75 ± 1.48) than in the WT mice (0.62 ± 0.67). The serum lipoprotein levels in the Apoe-deficient mice were also significantly higher than in the WT mice. In Experiment 2, the incidence (29%) and multiplicity (0.50 ± 0.94) of CRCs in the Ldlr mice were significantly lower than in the WT mice (80% incidence and 3.10 ± 2.38 multiplicity). The mRNA expression of two inducible enzymes and certain pro-inflammatory cytokines in the colorectum of each genotype was greater than in the respective WT mice. The values in the Apoe-deficient mice were much greater than in the Ldlr mice. These findings suggest that Apoe-deficient mice showed increased susceptibility to inflammation-associated colorectal carcinogenesis due to their high reactivity to inflammatory stimuli. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammation and Cancer)
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Open AccessArticle PPIC, EMP3 and CHI3L1 Are Novel Prognostic Markers for High Grade Glioma
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1808; doi:10.3390/ijms17111808
Received: 22 August 2016 / Revised: 18 October 2016 / Accepted: 25 October 2016 / Published: 28 October 2016
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Abstract
Current treatment methods for patients diagnosed with gliomas have shown limited success. This is partly due to the lack of prognostic genes available to accurately predict disease outcomes. The aim of this study was to investigate novel prognostic genes based on the molecular
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Current treatment methods for patients diagnosed with gliomas have shown limited success. This is partly due to the lack of prognostic genes available to accurately predict disease outcomes. The aim of this study was to investigate novel prognostic genes based on the molecular profile of tumor samples and their correlation with clinical parameters. In the current study, microarray data (GSE4412 and GSE7696) downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus were used to identify differentially expressed prognostic genes (DEPGs) by significant analysis of microarray (SAM) between long-term survivors (>2 years) and short-term survivors (≤2 years). DEPGs generated from these two datasets were intersected to obtain a list of common DEPGs. The expression of a subset of common DEPGs was then independently validated by real-time reverse transcription quantitative PCR (qPCR). Survival value of the common DEPGs was validated using known survival data from the GSE4412 and TCGA dataset. After intersecting DEPGs generated from the above two datasets, three genes were identified which may potentially be used to determine glioma patient prognosis. Independent validation with glioma patients tissue (n = 70) and normal brain tissue (n = 19) found PPIC, EMP3 and CHI3L1 were up-regulated in glioma tissue. Survival value validation showed that the three genes correlated with patient survival by Kaplan-Meir analysis, including grades, age and therapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection Advances in Molecular Oncology)
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Open AccessArticle Tocotrienol Affects Oxidative Stress, Cholesterol Homeostasis and the Amyloidogenic Pathway in Neuroblastoma Cells: Consequences for Alzheimer’s Disease
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1809; doi:10.3390/ijms17111809
Received: 31 August 2016 / Revised: 18 October 2016 / Accepted: 21 October 2016 / Published: 29 October 2016
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (1637 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
One of the characteristics of Alzheimer´s disease (AD) is an increased amyloid load and an enhanced level of reactive oxidative species (ROS). Vitamin E has known beneficial neuroprotective effects, and previously, some studies suggested that vitamin E is associated with a reduced risk
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One of the characteristics of Alzheimer´s disease (AD) is an increased amyloid load and an enhanced level of reactive oxidative species (ROS). Vitamin E has known beneficial neuroprotective effects, and previously, some studies suggested that vitamin E is associated with a reduced risk of AD due to its antioxidative properties. However, epidemiological studies and nutritional approaches of vitamin E treatment are controversial. Here, we investigate the effect of α-tocotrienol, which belongs to the group of vitamin E, on AD-relevant processes in neuronal cell lines. In line with the literature, α-tocotrienol reduced the ROS level in SH-SY5Y cells. In the presence of tocotrienols, cholesterol and cholesterol esters, which have been shown to be risk factors in AD, were decreased. Besides the unambiguous positive effects of tocotrienol, amyloid-β (Aβ) levels were increased accompanied by an increase in the activity of enzymes responsible for Aβ production. Proteins and gene expression of the secretases and their components remained unchanged, whereas tocotrienol accelerates enzyme activity in cell-free assays. Besides enhanced Aβ production, tocotrienols inhibited Aβ degradation in neuro 2a (N2a)-cells. Our results might help to understand the controversial findings of vitamin E studies and demonstrate that besides the known positive neuroprotective properties, tocotrienols also have negative characteristics with respect to AD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tocopherols and Tocotrienols: Metabolism and Properties)
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Open AccessArticle The Neuroprotective Properties of Hericium erinaceus in Glutamate-Damaged Differentiated PC12 Cells and an Alzheimer’s Disease Mouse Model
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1810; doi:10.3390/ijms17111810
Received: 20 August 2016 / Revised: 14 October 2016 / Accepted: 20 October 2016 / Published: 1 November 2016
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (4113 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Hericium erinaceus, an edible and medicinal mushroom, displays various pharmacological activities in the prevention of dementia in conditions such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease. The present study explored the neuroprotective effects of H. erinaceus mycelium polysaccharide-enriched aqueous extract (HE) on an l
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Hericium erinaceus, an edible and medicinal mushroom, displays various pharmacological activities in the prevention of dementia in conditions such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease. The present study explored the neuroprotective effects of H. erinaceus mycelium polysaccharide-enriched aqueous extract (HE) on an l-glutamic acid (l-Glu)-induced differentiated PC12 (DPC12) cellular apoptosis model and an AlCl3 combined with d-galactose-induced Alzheimer’s disease mouse model. The data revealed that HE successfully induced PC12 cell differentiation. A 3 h HE incubation at doses of 50 and 100 µg/mL before 25 mM of l-Glu effectively reversed the reduction of cell viability and the enhancement of the nuclear apoptosis rate in DPC12 cells. Compared with l-Glu-damaged cells, in PC12 cells, HE suppressed intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation, blocked Ca2+ overload and prevented mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) depolarization. In the Alzheimer’s disease mouse model, HE administration enhanced the horizontal and vertical movements in the autonomic activity test, improved the endurance time in the rotarod test, and decreased the escape latency time in the water maze test. It also improved the central cholinergic system function in the Alzheimer’s mice, demonstrated by the fact that it dose-dependently enhanced the acetylcholine (Ach) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) concentrations in both the serum and the hypothalamus. Our findings provide experimental evidence that HE may provide neuroprotective candidates for treating or preventing neurodegenerative diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neuroprotective Strategies 2016)
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Open AccessArticle Deletion of afpab1 Causes Increased Sensitivity to Oxidative Stress and Hypovirulence in Aspergillus fumigatus
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1811; doi:10.3390/ijms17111811
Received: 31 May 2016 / Revised: 15 October 2016 / Accepted: 25 October 2016 / Published: 29 October 2016
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Abstract
Aspergillus fumigatus AFPAB1 is the ortholog of the Aspergillus oryzae cytoplasmic messenger ribonucleoprotein granules AOPAB1 that function to depress the initiation of translation during stress. A. fumigatus can regulate its cellular physiology in response to environmental stresses, but there has been no research
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Aspergillus fumigatus AFPAB1 is the ortholog of the Aspergillus oryzae cytoplasmic messenger ribonucleoprotein granules AOPAB1 that function to depress the initiation of translation during stress. A. fumigatus can regulate its cellular physiology in response to environmental stresses, but there has been no research on Pab1 in A. fumigatus. The associated gene afpab1 was replaced with a hygromycin-selectable marker to generate the strain Δafpab1. Phenotypic analysis showed that the Δafpab1 grew more weakly than the wild-type strain. Also the germination rate of Δafpab1 was decreased when exposed to oxidative stress. The morphology of Δafpab1 spores also showed great changes. The killing rate of Δafpab1 by RAW264.7 murine macrophage cells was increased, and the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging ability of Δafpab1 was decreased. Pathogenicity testing showed that the deletion strain had decreased virulence. Therefore, we conclude that afpab1 activity is correlated with susceptibility to oxidative stress, and deletion of afpab1 from A. fumigatus possibly leads to observed hypovirulence in an immunosuppressed mouse model. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Biochemistry, Molecular and Cellular Biology)
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Open AccessArticle The Rheology behind Stress-Induced Solidification in Native Silk Feedstocks
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1812; doi:10.3390/ijms17111812
Received: 31 August 2016 / Revised: 21 October 2016 / Accepted: 25 October 2016 / Published: 29 October 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (2288 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The mechanism by which native silk feedstocks are converted to solid fibres in nature has attracted much interest. To address this question, the present work used rheology to investigate the gelation of Bombyx mori native silk feedstock. Exceeding a critical shear stress appeared
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The mechanism by which native silk feedstocks are converted to solid fibres in nature has attracted much interest. To address this question, the present work used rheology to investigate the gelation of Bombyx mori native silk feedstock. Exceeding a critical shear stress appeared to be more important than shear rate, during flow-induced initiation. Compositional changes (salts, pH etc.,) were not required, although their possible role in vivo is not excluded. Moreover, after successful initiation, gel strength continued to increase over a considerable time under effectively quiescent conditions, without requiring further application of the initial stimulus. Gelation by elevated temperature or freezing was also observed. Prior to gelation, literature suggests that silk protein adopts a random coil configuration, which argued against the conventional explanation of gelation, based on hydrophilic and hydrophobic interactions. Instead, a new hypothesis is presented, based on entropically-driven loss of hydration, which appears to explain the apparently diverse methods by which silk feedstocks can be gelled. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Silk-Based Materials: From Production to Characterization)
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Open AccessArticle Directed Evolution of Dunaliella salina Ds-26-16 and Salt-Tolerant Response in Escherichia coli
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1813; doi:10.3390/ijms17111813
Received: 19 September 2016 / Revised: 17 October 2016 / Accepted: 25 October 2016 / Published: 29 October 2016
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Abstract
Identification and evolution of salt tolerant genes are crucial steps in developing salt tolerant crops or microorganisms using biotechnology. Ds-26-16, a salt tolerant gene that was isolated from Dunaliella salina, encodes a transcription factor that can confer salt tolerance to a
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Identification and evolution of salt tolerant genes are crucial steps in developing salt tolerant crops or microorganisms using biotechnology. Ds-26-16, a salt tolerant gene that was isolated from Dunaliella salina, encodes a transcription factor that can confer salt tolerance to a number of organisms including Escherichia coli (E. coli), Haematococcus pluvialis and tobacco. To further improve its salt tolerance, a random mutagenesis library was constructed using deoxyinosine triphosphate-mediated error-prone PCR technology, and then screened using an E. coli expression system that is based on its broad-spectrum salt tolerance. Seven variants with enhanced salt tolerance were obtained. Variant EP-5 that contained mutation S32P showed the most improvement with the E. coli transformant enduring salt concentrations up to 1.54 M, in comparison with 1.03 M for the wild type gene. Besides, Ds-26-16 and EP-5 also conferred E. coli transformant tolerance to freezing, cold, heat, Cu2+ and alkaline. Homology modeling revealed that mutation S32P in EP-5 caused the conformational change of N- and C-terminal α-helixes. Expression of Ds-26-16 and EP-5 maintained normal cellular morphology, increased the intracellular antioxidant enzymatic activity, reduced malondialdehyde content, and stimulated Nitric Oxide synthesis, thus enhancing salt tolerance to E. coli transformants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Biochemistry, Molecular and Cellular Biology)
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Open AccessArticle Assessing Heterogeneity of Osteolytic Lesions in Multiple Myeloma by 1H HR-MAS NMR Metabolomics
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1814; doi:10.3390/ijms17111814
Received: 1 August 2016 / Revised: 5 October 2016 / Accepted: 20 October 2016 / Published: 31 October 2016
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Abstract
Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignancy of plasma cells characterized by multifocal osteolytic bone lesions. Macroscopic and genetic heterogeneity has been documented within MM lesions. Understanding the bases of such heterogeneity may unveil relevant features of MM pathobiology. To this aim, we deployed
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Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignancy of plasma cells characterized by multifocal osteolytic bone lesions. Macroscopic and genetic heterogeneity has been documented within MM lesions. Understanding the bases of such heterogeneity may unveil relevant features of MM pathobiology. To this aim, we deployed unbiased 1H high-resolution magic-angle spinning (HR-MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolomics to analyze multiple biopsy specimens of osteolytic lesions from one case of pathological fracture caused by MM. Multivariate analyses on normalized metabolite peak integrals allowed clusterization of samples in accordance with a posteriori histological findings. We investigated the relationship between morphological and NMR features by merging morphological data and metabolite profiling into a single correlation matrix. Data-merging addressed tissue heterogeneity, and greatly facilitated the mapping of lesions and nearby healthy tissues. Our proof-of-principle study reveals integrated metabolomics and histomorphology as a promising approach for the targeted study of osteolytic lesions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Bone Metastasis)
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Open AccessArticle In Vivo Follow-up of Brain Tumor Growth via Bioluminescence Imaging and Fluorescence Tomography
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1815; doi:10.3390/ijms17111815
Received: 29 August 2016 / Revised: 27 September 2016 / Accepted: 21 October 2016 / Published: 31 October 2016
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Abstract
Reporter gene-based strategies are widely used in experimental oncology. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) using the firefly luciferase (Fluc) as a reporter gene and d-luciferin as a substrate is currently the most widely employed technique. The present paper compares the performances of BLI imaging
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Reporter gene-based strategies are widely used in experimental oncology. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) using the firefly luciferase (Fluc) as a reporter gene and d-luciferin as a substrate is currently the most widely employed technique. The present paper compares the performances of BLI imaging with fluorescence imaging using the near infrared fluorescent protein (iRFP) to monitor brain tumor growth in mice. Fluorescence imaging includes fluorescence reflectance imaging (FRI), fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (fDOT), and fluorescence molecular Imaging (FMT®). A U87 cell line was genetically modified for constitutive expression of both the encoding Fluc and iRFP reporter genes and assayed for cell, subcutaneous tumor and brain tumor imaging. On cultured cells, BLI was more sensitive than FRI; in vivo, tumors were first detected by BLI. Fluorescence of iRFP provided convenient tools such as flux cytometry, direct detection of the fluorescent protein on histological slices, and fluorescent tomography that allowed for 3D localization and absolute quantification of the fluorescent signal in brain tumors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cancer Molecular Imaging in the Era of Precision Medicine)
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Open AccessArticle Cx43 Mediates Resistance against MPP+-Induced Apoptosis in SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells via Modulating the Mitochondrial Apoptosis Pathway
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1819; doi:10.3390/ijms17111819
Received: 8 September 2016 / Revised: 13 October 2016 / Accepted: 25 October 2016 / Published: 1 November 2016
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Abstract
Neuronal apoptosis in the substantia nigra par compacta (SNpc) appears to play an essential role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease. However, the mechanisms responsible for the death of dopaminergic neurons are not fully understood yet. To explore the apoptotic mechanisms, we used
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Neuronal apoptosis in the substantia nigra par compacta (SNpc) appears to play an essential role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease. However, the mechanisms responsible for the death of dopaminergic neurons are not fully understood yet. To explore the apoptotic mechanisms, we used a well-known parkinsonian toxin, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MPP+), to induce neuronal apoptosis in the human dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cell line. The most common method of interaction between cells is gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) mediated by gap junctions (GJs) formed by transmembrane proteins called connexins (Cx). Modulation of GJIC affects cell viability or growth, implying that GJIC may have an important role in maintaining homeostasis in various organs. Here, we hypothesized that increasing the level of the gap junction protein Cx43 in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells could provide neuroprotection. First, our experiments demonstrated that knocking down Cx43 protein by using Cx43-specific shRNA in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells potentiated MPP+-induced neuronal apoptosis evident from decreased cell viability. In another experiment, we demonstrated that over-expression of Cx43 in the SH-SY5Y cell system decreased MPP+-induced apoptosis based on the MTT assay and reduced the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and the release of cytochrome C based on Western blot analysis. Taken together, our results suggest that Cx43 could mediate resistance against MPP+-induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells via modulating the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection Programmed Cell Death and Apoptosis)
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Open AccessArticle Expression of Carbonic Anhydrase I in Motor Neurons and Alterations in ALS
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1820; doi:10.3390/ijms17111820
Received: 9 August 2016 / Revised: 20 October 2016 / Accepted: 24 October 2016 / Published: 1 November 2016
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Abstract
Carbonic anhydrase I (CA1) is the cytosolic isoform of mammalian α-CA family members which are responsible for maintaining pH homeostasis in the physiology and pathology of organisms. A subset of CA isoforms are known to be expressed and function in the central nervous
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Carbonic anhydrase I (CA1) is the cytosolic isoform of mammalian α-CA family members which are responsible for maintaining pH homeostasis in the physiology and pathology of organisms. A subset of CA isoforms are known to be expressed and function in the central nervous system (CNS). CA1 has not been extensively characterized in the CNS. In this study, we demonstrate that CA1 is expressed in the motor neurons in human spinal cord. Unexpectedly, a subpopulation of CA1 appears to be associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes. In addition, the membrane-associated CA1s are preferentially upregulated in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and exhibit altered distribution in motor neurons. Furthermore, long-term expression of CA1 in mammalian cells activates apoptosis. Our results suggest a previously unknown role for CA1 function in the CNS and its potential involvement in motor neuron degeneration in ALS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Molecular Pathology, Diagnostics, and Therapeutics)
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Open AccessArticle Assessment of Photodynamic Inactivation against Periodontal Bacteria Mediated by a Chitosan Hydrogel in a 3D Gingival Model
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1821; doi:10.3390/ijms17111821
Received: 8 September 2016 / Revised: 24 October 2016 / Accepted: 27 October 2016 / Published: 1 November 2016
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Abstract
Chitosan hydrogels containing hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) and toluidine blue O were prepared and assessed for their mucoadhesive property and antimicrobial efficacy of photodynamic inactivation (PDI). Increased HPMC content in the hydrogels resulted in increased mucoadhesiveness. Furthermore, we developed a simple In Vitro 3D
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Chitosan hydrogels containing hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) and toluidine blue O were prepared and assessed for their mucoadhesive property and antimicrobial efficacy of photodynamic inactivation (PDI). Increased HPMC content in the hydrogels resulted in increased mucoadhesiveness. Furthermore, we developed a simple In Vitro 3D gingival model resembling the oral periodontal pocket to culture the biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans), and Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis). The PDI efficacy of chitosan hydrogel was examined against periodontal biofilms cultured in this 3D gingival model. We found that the PDI effectiveness was limited due to leaving some of the innermost bacteria alive at the non-illuminated site. Using this 3D gingival model, we further optimized PDI procedures with various adjustments of light energy and irradiation sites. The PDI efficacy of the chitosan hydrogel against periodontal biofilms can significantly improve via four sides of irradiation. In conclusion, this study not only showed the clinical applicability of this chitosan hydrogel but also the importance of the light irradiation pattern in performing PDI for periodontal disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Polymers 2016)
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Open AccessArticle Pretransplant Levels of CRP and Interleukin-6 Family Cytokines; Effects on Outcome after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1823; doi:10.3390/ijms17111823
Received: 23 September 2016 / Revised: 22 October 2016 / Accepted: 26 October 2016 / Published: 1 November 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (590 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Several pretransplant factors, including CRP (C-reactive protein) levels, reflect the risk of complications after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. IL-6 induces CRP increase, and we therefore investigated the effects of pretransplant IL-6, soluble IL-6 receptors, IL-6 family cytokines and CRP serum levels on outcome
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Several pretransplant factors, including CRP (C-reactive protein) levels, reflect the risk of complications after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. IL-6 induces CRP increase, and we therefore investigated the effects of pretransplant IL-6, soluble IL-6 receptors, IL-6 family cytokines and CRP serum levels on outcome for 100 consecutive allotransplant recipients. All patients had related donors, none had active infections and 99 patients were in complete remission before conditioning. The incidence of acute graft versus host disease (aGVHD) requiring treatment was 40%, survival at Day +100 82%, and overall survival 48%. Despite a significant correlation between pretransplant CRP and IL-6 levels, only CRP levels significantly influenced transplant-related mortality (TRM). However, CRP did not influence overall survival (OS). Pretransplant IL-31 influenced late TRM. Finally, there was a significant association between pretransplant IL-6 and early postconditioning weight gain (i.e., fluid retention), and this fluid retention was a risk factor for aGVHD, TRM and OS. To conclude, pretransplant CRP, IL-31 and early posttransplant fluid retention were independent risk factors for TRM and survival after allotransplantation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Cell Transplantation)
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Open AccessArticle Effect of High-Carbohydrate Diet on Plasma Metabolome in Mice with Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Complex III Deficiency
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1824; doi:10.3390/ijms17111824
Received: 12 August 2016 / Revised: 24 September 2016 / Accepted: 24 October 2016 / Published: 1 November 2016
PDF Full-text (4048 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Mitochondrial disorders cause energy failure and metabolic derangements. Metabolome profiling in patients and animal models may identify affected metabolic pathways and reveal new biomarkers of disease progression. Using liver metabolomics we have shown a starvation-like condition in a knock-in (Bcs1lc.232A>G)
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Mitochondrial disorders cause energy failure and metabolic derangements. Metabolome profiling in patients and animal models may identify affected metabolic pathways and reveal new biomarkers of disease progression. Using liver metabolomics we have shown a starvation-like condition in a knock-in (Bcs1lc.232A>G) mouse model of GRACILE syndrome, a neonatal lethal respiratory chain complex III dysfunction with hepatopathy. Here, we hypothesized that a high-carbohydrate diet (HCD, 60% dextrose) will alleviate the hypoglycemia and promote survival of the sick mice. However, when fed HCD the homozygotes had shorter survival (mean ± SD, 29 ± 2.5 days, n = 21) than those on standard diet (33 ± 3.8 days, n = 30), and no improvement in hypoglycemia or liver glycogen depletion. We investigated the plasma metabolome of the HCD- and control diet-fed mice and found that several amino acids and urea cycle intermediates were increased, and arginine, carnitines, succinate, and purine catabolites decreased in the homozygotes. Despite reduced survival the increase in aromatic amino acids, an indicator of liver mitochondrial dysfunction, was normalized on HCD. Quantitative enrichment analysis revealed that glycine, serine and threonine metabolism, phenylalanine and tyrosine metabolism, and urea cycle were also partly normalized on HCD. This dietary intervention revealed an unexpected adverse effect of high-glucose diet in complex III deficiency, and suggests that plasma metabolomics is a valuable tool in evaluation of therapies in mitochondrial disorders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolomic Technologies in Medicine)
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Open AccessArticle MMP-3 Deficiency Alleviates Endotoxin-Induced Acute Inflammation in the Posterior Eye Segment
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1825; doi:10.3390/ijms17111825
Received: 29 September 2016 / Revised: 20 October 2016 / Accepted: 25 October 2016 / Published: 1 November 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (6538 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) is known to mediate neuroinflammatory processes by activating microglia, disrupting blood–central nervous system barriers and supporting neutrophil influx into the brain. In addition, the posterior part of the eye, more specifically the retina, the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and the
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Matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) is known to mediate neuroinflammatory processes by activating microglia, disrupting blood–central nervous system barriers and supporting neutrophil influx into the brain. In addition, the posterior part of the eye, more specifically the retina, the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and the blood–retinal barrier, is affected upon neuroinflammation, but a role for MMP-3 during ocular inflammation remains elusive. We investigated whether MMP-3 contributes to acute inflammation in the eye using the endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU) model. Systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide induced an increase in MMP-3 mRNA and protein expression level in the posterior part of the eye. MMP-3 deficiency or knockdown suppressed retinal leukocyte adhesion and leukocyte infiltration into the vitreous cavity in mice subjected to EIU. Moreover, retinal and RPE mRNA levels of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (Icam1), interleukin 6 (Il6), cytokine-inducible nitrogen oxide synthase (Nos2) and tumor necrosis factor α (Tnfα), which are key molecules involved in EIU, were clearly reduced in MMP-3 deficient mice. In addition, loss of MMP-3 repressed the upregulation of the chemokines monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 and (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1). These findings suggest a contribution of MMP-3 during EIU, and its potential use as a therapeutic drug target in reducing ocular inflammation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metalloproteins 2017)
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Open AccessArticle The Effect of Everolimus in an In Vitro Model of Triple Negative Breast Cancer and Osteoclasts
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1827; doi:10.3390/ijms17111827
Received: 30 June 2016 / Revised: 21 October 2016 / Accepted: 27 October 2016 / Published: 1 November 2016
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Abstract
Metastatic bone disease has a major impact on morbidity of breast cancer (BC) patients. Alterations in mTOR signaling are involved both in cancer progression and in osteoclast differentiation. The purpose of this study was to assess the role of mTOR inhibitor Everolimus (Eve)
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Metastatic bone disease has a major impact on morbidity of breast cancer (BC) patients. Alterations in mTOR signaling are involved both in cancer progression and in osteoclast differentiation. The purpose of this study was to assess the role of mTOR inhibitor Everolimus (Eve) on osteoclastogenesis induced by triple negative BC cells. To this aim, we developed an in vitro human model of osteoclastogenesis from peripheral blood monocytes co-cultured with the triple negative SCP2 and the hormonal receptor positive MCF7 cell lines. Osteoclastogenesis was evaluated by TRAP staining, evaluation of F actin rings and Calcitonin Receptor expression. Eve significantly reduced differentiation induced by cancer cells and resulted more effective when evaluated in combination with Denosumab and Zoledronic Acid (Zol). Combination with Zol showed a total abrogation of osteoclast differentiation induced by the triple negative cell line, not by MCF7. Finally, we observed that Eve was active in the inhibition of the crosstalk between cancer cells and osteoclasts reproduced by our model, highlighting a new therapeutic choice for the subsetting of triple negative BC patients. We observed a difference in the response to bone-targeted therapy with respect to BC subtypes. Our model may represent a valid platform for preclinical trials on bone-targeted drugs and for the study of the interplay of BC with bone stromal cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Bone Metastasis)
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Open AccessArticle The Compositional HJ-Biplot—A New Approach to Identifying the Links among Bioactive Compounds of Tomatoes
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1828; doi:10.3390/ijms17111828
Received: 28 July 2016 / Revised: 27 October 2016 / Accepted: 28 October 2016 / Published: 2 November 2016
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Abstract
Tomatoes have been described as a functional food because of their particular composition of different bioactive compounds. In this study, the proximate composition, minerals and trace elements, and antioxidant compounds were determined in two tomato cultivars (Mariana and Dunkan) that were grown in
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Tomatoes have been described as a functional food because of their particular composition of different bioactive compounds. In this study, the proximate composition, minerals and trace elements, and antioxidant compounds were determined in two tomato cultivars (Mariana and Dunkan) that were grown in Gran Canaria (Spain) either conventionally or hydroponically. Although compositional data of this type require being subjected to the specific statistical techniques of compositional analysis, this approach has not usually been considered in this context. In the present case, a compositional Mann–Whitney U test of the data showed significant differences for each factor (cultivar and cultivation system) in several of the compositional variables studied. For the differences between cultivars, these parameters were the protein, Mg, lycopene, ascorbic acid, citric acid, and fumaric acid contents. For the differences between cultivation systems, they were mainly those of the mineral and trace elements group. Although one-year data are insufficient to make clear relationship among compounds because more repetitions in several localities and years are necessary, the compositional HJ-biplot (in which the links provide estimates of the linear relationship among variables) results agreed with other scientific results about linear relationship among some compounds analyzed. Full article
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Open AccessArticle USP19-Mediated Deubiquitination Facilitates the Stabilization of HRD1 Ubiquitin Ligase
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1829; doi:10.3390/ijms17111829
Received: 5 July 2016 / Revised: 26 October 2016 / Accepted: 27 October 2016 / Published: 2 November 2016
PDF Full-text (2089 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
In the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), misfolded and unfolded proteins are eliminated by a process called ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD) in order to maintain cell homeostasis. In the ERAD pathway, several ER-localized E3 ubiquitin ligases target ERAD substrate proteins for ubiquitination and subsequent proteasomal
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In the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), misfolded and unfolded proteins are eliminated by a process called ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD) in order to maintain cell homeostasis. In the ERAD pathway, several ER-localized E3 ubiquitin ligases target ERAD substrate proteins for ubiquitination and subsequent proteasomal degradation. However, little is known about how the functions of the ERAD ubiquitin ligases are regulated. Recently, USP19, an ER-anchored deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB), has been suggested to be involved in the regulation of ERAD. In this study, HRD1, an ERAD ubiquitin ligase, is shown to be a novel substrate for USP19. We demonstrate that USP19 rescues HRD1 from proteasomal degradation by deubiquitination of K48-linked ubiquitin chains. In addition, the altered expression of USP19 affects the steady-state levels of HRD1. These results suggest that USP19 regulates the stability of HRD1 and provide insight into the regulatory mechanism of the ERAD ubiquitin ligases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Biochemistry, Molecular and Cellular Biology)
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Open AccessArticle Programmed Effects in Neurobehavior and Antioxidative Physiology in Zebrafish Embryonically Exposed to Cadmium: Observations and Hypothesized Adverse Outcome Pathway Framework
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1830; doi:10.3390/ijms17111830
Received: 30 August 2016 / Revised: 14 October 2016 / Accepted: 24 October 2016 / Published: 2 November 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (6538 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are a major cause of premature mortality. Recent studies show that predispositions for NCDs may arise from early-life exposure to low concentrations of environmental contaminants. This developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD) paradigm suggests that programming of an embryo
[...] Read more.
Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are a major cause of premature mortality. Recent studies show that predispositions for NCDs may arise from early-life exposure to low concentrations of environmental contaminants. This developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD) paradigm suggests that programming of an embryo can be disrupted, changing the homeostatic set point of biological functions. Epigenetic alterations are a possible underlying mechanism. Here, we investigated the DOHaD paradigm by exposing zebrafish to subtoxic concentrations of the ubiquitous contaminant cadmium during embryogenesis, followed by growth under normal conditions. Prolonged behavioral responses to physical stress and altered antioxidative physiology were observed approximately ten weeks after termination of embryonal exposure, at concentrations that were 50–3200-fold below the direct embryotoxic concentration, and interpreted as altered developmental programming. Literature was explored for possible mechanistic pathways that link embryonic subtoxic cadmium to the observed apical phenotypes, more specifically, the probability of molecular mechanisms induced by cadmium exposure leading to altered DNA methylation and subsequently to the observed apical phenotypes. This was done using the adverse outcome pathway model framework, and assessing key event relationship plausibility by tailored Bradford-Hill analysis. Thus, cadmium interaction with thiols appeared to be the major contributor to late-life effects. Cadmium-thiol interactions may lead to depletion of the methyl donor S-adenosyl-methionine, resulting in methylome alterations, and may, additionally, result in oxidative stress, which may lead to DNA oxidation, and subsequently altered DNA methyltransferase activity. In this way, DNA methylation may be affected at a critical developmental stage, causing the observed apical phenotypes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Zebrafish: A Model for Toxicological Research)
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Open AccessArticle Age-Related Renal Microvascular Changes: Evaluation by Three-Dimensional Digital Imaging of the Human Renal Microcirculation Using Virtual Microscopy
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1831; doi:10.3390/ijms17111831
Received: 31 August 2016 / Revised: 21 October 2016 / Accepted: 27 October 2016 / Published: 2 November 2016
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Abstract
The renal microvasculature is targeted during aging, sometimes producing chronic kidney disease (CKD). Overdiagnosis of CKD in older persons is concerning. To prevent it, a new concept of “healthy aging” is arising from a healthy renal donor study. We investigated the renal microcirculatory
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The renal microvasculature is targeted during aging, sometimes producing chronic kidney disease (CKD). Overdiagnosis of CKD in older persons is concerning. To prevent it, a new concept of “healthy aging” is arising from a healthy renal donor study. We investigated the renal microcirculatory changes of three older persons and compared them with that of one patient with nephrosclerosis using a three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction technique that we previously developed. This method uses a virtual slide system and paraffin-embedded serial sections of surgical material that was double-immunostained by anti-CD34 and anti-α smooth muscle actin (SMA) antibodies for detecting endothelial cells and medial smooth muscle cells, respectively. In all cases, the 3D images proved that arteriosclerotic changes in large proximal interlobular arteries did not directly induce distal arterial change or glomerulosclerosis. The nephrosclerotic patient showed severe hyalinosis with luminal narrowing of small arteries directly inducing glomerulosclerosis. We also visualized an atubular glomerulus and intraglomerular dilatation of an afferent arteriole during healthy aging on the 3D image and showed that microcirculatory changes were responsible for them. Thus, we successfully visualized healthy aged kidneys on 3D images and confirmed the underlying pathology. This method has the ability to investigate renal microcirculatory damage during healthy aging. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Atherosclerosis and Vascular Imaging 2016) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessArticle Interferon α Induces the Apoptosis of Cervical Cancer HeLa Cells by Activating both the Intrinsic Mitochondrial Pathway and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Induced Pathway
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1832; doi:10.3390/ijms17111832
Received: 29 July 2016 / Revised: 14 October 2016 / Accepted: 27 October 2016 / Published: 2 November 2016
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (3633 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The interferon α (IFN-α) has been often used as a sensitizing agent for the treatment of various malignancies such as hepatocellular carcinoma, malignant melanoma, and renal cell cancer by promoting the apoptosis of thesetumor cell types. However, the effect of IFN-α on cervical
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The interferon α (IFN-α) has been often used as a sensitizing agent for the treatment of various malignancies such as hepatocellular carcinoma, malignant melanoma, and renal cell cancer by promoting the apoptosis of thesetumor cell types. However, the effect of IFN-α on cervical cancer remains unknown. In this study, HeLa cells were used as a testing model for the treatment of IFN-α on cervical cancer. The results indicate that IFN-α markedly inhibits the proliferation and induces the apoptosis of HeLa cells. The activation of caspase 3, the up-regulation of both Bim and cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) 1, the down-regulation of Bcl-xL, as well as the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria were significantly induced upon IFN-α treatment, indicating that the intrinsic apoptotic pathway could be activated by IFN-α treatment. In addition, caspase 4—which is involved in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced apoptosis—was activated in response to IFN-α treatment. Knocking down caspase 4 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) markedly reduced the IFN-α-mediated cell apoptosis. However, no significant changes in the expressions of caspases 8 and 10 were observed upon IFN-α treatment, indicating that the apoptosis caused by IFN-α might be independent of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. These findings suggest that IFN-α may possess anti-cervical cancer capacity by activating cell apoptosis via the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway and caspase-4-related ER stress-induced pathway. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection Programmed Cell Death and Apoptosis)
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Open AccessArticle Comparative Analysis of Toxic Responses of Organic Extracts from Diesel and Selected Alternative Fuels Engine Emissions in Human Lung BEAS-2B Cells
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1833; doi:10.3390/ijms17111833
Received: 9 August 2016 / Revised: 11 October 2016 / Accepted: 25 October 2016 / Published: 3 November 2016
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (2076 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
This study used toxicogenomics to identify the complex biological response of human lung BEAS-2B cells treated with organic components of particulate matter in the exhaust of a diesel engine. First, we characterized particles from standard diesel (B0), biodiesel (methylesters of rapeseed oil) in
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This study used toxicogenomics to identify the complex biological response of human lung BEAS-2B cells treated with organic components of particulate matter in the exhaust of a diesel engine. First, we characterized particles from standard diesel (B0), biodiesel (methylesters of rapeseed oil) in its neat form (B100) and 30% by volume blend with diesel fuel (B30), and neat hydrotreated vegetable oil (NEXBTL100). The concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their derivatives in organic extracts was the lowest for NEXBTL100 and higher for biodiesel. We further analyzed global gene expression changes in BEAS-2B cells following 4 h and 24 h treatment with extracts. The concentrations of 50 µg extract/mL induced a similar molecular response. The common processes induced after 4 h treatment included antioxidant defense, metabolism of xenobiotics and lipids, suppression of pro-apoptotic stimuli, or induction of plasminogen activating cascade; 24 h treatment affected fewer processes, particularly those involved in detoxification of xenobiotics, including PAHs. The majority of distinctively deregulated genes detected after both 4 h and 24 h treatment were induced by NEXBTL100; the deregulated genes included, e.g., those involved in antioxidant defense and cell cycle regulation and proliferation. B100 extract, with the highest PAH concentrations, additionally affected several cell cycle regulatory genes and p38 signaling. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Research on Global Climate Change and Atmospheric Pollution)
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Open AccessArticle Factors Affecting the Baseline and Post-Treatment Scores on the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised Japanese Version before and after Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1834; doi:10.3390/ijms17111834
Received: 7 July 2016 / Revised: 14 October 2016 / Accepted: 27 October 2016 / Published: 3 November 2016
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Abstract
Our objectives were to (1) investigate the feasibility of the use of the Japanese version of the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised (HVLT-R); (2) identify the clinical factors influencing the HVLT-R scores of patients undergoing whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT); and (3) compare the neurocognitive
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Our objectives were to (1) investigate the feasibility of the use of the Japanese version of the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised (HVLT-R); (2) identify the clinical factors influencing the HVLT-R scores of patients undergoing whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT); and (3) compare the neurocognitive function (NCF) after WBRT in different dose fractionation schedules. We administered the HVLT-R (Japanese version) before (baseline) and at four and eight months after WBRT in 45 patients who received either therapeutic (35Gy-in-14, n = 16; 30Gy-in-10, n = 18) or prophylactic (25Gy-in-10, n = 11) WBRT. Sixteen patients dropped out before the eight-month examination, due mostly to death from cancer. The Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) 80–100 group had significantly higher baseline total recall (TR) scores (p = 0.0053), delayed recall (DR) scores (p = 0.012), and delayed recognition (DRecog) scores (p = 0.0078). The patients aged ≤65 years also had significantly higher TR scores (p = 0.030) and DRecog scores (p = 0.031). The patients who underwent two examinations (worse-prognosis group) had significantly decreased DR scores four months after WBRT compared to the baseline (p = 0.0073), and they were significantly more likely to have declined individual TR scores (p = 0.0017) and DR scores (p = 0.035) at four months. The eight-month HVLT-R scores did not significantly decline regardless of the WBRT dose fractionation. The baseline NCF was determined by age and KPS, and the early decline in NCF is characteristic of the worse-prognosis group. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Brain Metastasis 2016)
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Open AccessArticle Salvianolic Acid B (Sal B) Protects Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells from Oxidative Stress-Induced Cell Death by Activating Glutaredoxin 1 (Grx1)
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1835; doi:10.3390/ijms17111835
Received: 14 July 2016 / Revised: 8 October 2016 / Accepted: 31 October 2016 / Published: 3 November 2016
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (4071 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Protein glutathionylation, defined as the formation of protein mixed disulfides (PSSG) between cysteine residues and glutathione (GSH), can lead to cell death. Glutaredoxin 1 (Grx1) is a thiol repair enzyme which catalyzes the reduction of PSSG. Therefore, Grx1 exerts strong anti-apoptotic effects by
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Protein glutathionylation, defined as the formation of protein mixed disulfides (PSSG) between cysteine residues and glutathione (GSH), can lead to cell death. Glutaredoxin 1 (Grx1) is a thiol repair enzyme which catalyzes the reduction of PSSG. Therefore, Grx1 exerts strong anti-apoptotic effects by improving the redox state, especially in times of oxidative stress. However, there is currently no compound that is identified as a Grx1 activator. In this study, we identified and characterized Salvianolic acid B (Sal B), a natural compound, as a Grx1 inducer, which potently protected retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells from oxidative injury. Our results showed that treatment with Sal B protected primary human RPE cells from H2O2-induced cell damage. Interestingly, we found Sal B pretreatment upregulated Grx1 expression in RPE cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), the key transcription factor that regulates the expression of Grx1, was activated in Sal B treated RPE cells. Further investigation showed that knockdown of Grx1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly reduced the protective effects of Sal B. We conclude that Sal B protects RPE cells against H2O2-induced cell injury through Grx1 induction by activating Nrf2 pathway, thus preventing lethal accumulation of PSSG and reversing oxidative damage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neuroprotective Strategies 2016)
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Open AccessArticle The Chemical Composition of Essential Oils from Cinnamomum camphora and Their Insecticidal Activity against the Stored Product Pests
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1836; doi:10.3390/ijms17111836
Received: 18 August 2016 / Revised: 22 September 2016 / Accepted: 31 October 2016 / Published: 4 November 2016
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Abstract
To investigate the chemical composition and insecticidal activity of the essential oils of certain Chinese medicinal herbs and spices, the essential oils were extracted from the stem barks, leaves, and fruits of Cinnamomum camphora (L.) Presl, which were found to possess strong fumigant
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To investigate the chemical composition and insecticidal activity of the essential oils of certain Chinese medicinal herbs and spices, the essential oils were extracted from the stem barks, leaves, and fruits of Cinnamomum camphora (L.) Presl, which were found to possess strong fumigant toxicity against Tribolium castaneum and Lasioderma serricorne adults. The essential oils of the plants were extracted by the method of steam distillation using a Clavenger apparatus. Their composition was determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometric (GC-MS) analyses (HP-5MS column), and their insecticidal activity was measured by seal-spaced fumigation. D-camphor (51.3%), 1,8-cineole (4.3%), and α-terpineol (3.8%), while D-camphor (28.1%), linalool (22.9%), and 1,8-cineole (5.3%) were the main constituents of its fruits. The essential oils of the C. camphora all showed fumigant and contact toxicity. Other compounds exhibited various levels of bioactivities. The results indicate that the essential oils of C. camphora and its individual compounds can be considered a natural resource for the two stored-product insect management. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Comparative Transcriptional Analysis of Loquat Fruit Identifies Major Signal Networks Involved in Fruit Development and Ripening Process
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1837; doi:10.3390/ijms17111837
Received: 18 July 2016 / Revised: 24 October 2016 / Accepted: 26 October 2016 / Published: 4 November 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (7364 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Loquat (Eriobotrya japonica Lindl.) is an important non-climacteric fruit and rich in essential nutrients such as minerals and carotenoids. During fruit development and ripening, thousands of the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) from various metabolic pathways cause a series of physiological and biochemical
[...] Read more.
Loquat (Eriobotrya japonica Lindl.) is an important non-climacteric fruit and rich in essential nutrients such as minerals and carotenoids. During fruit development and ripening, thousands of the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) from various metabolic pathways cause a series of physiological and biochemical changes. To better understand the underlying mechanism of fruit development, the Solexa/Illumina RNA-seq high-throughput sequencing was used to evaluate the global changes of gene transcription levels. More than 51,610,234 high quality reads from ten runs of fruit development were sequenced and assembled into 48,838 unigenes. Among 3256 DEGs, 2304 unigenes could be annotated to the Gene Ontology database. These DEGs were distributed into 119 pathways described in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database. A large number of DEGs were involved in carbohydrate metabolism, hormone signaling, and cell-wall degradation. The real-time reverse transcription (qRT)-PCR analyses revealed that several genes related to cell expansion, auxin signaling and ethylene response were differentially expressed during fruit development. Other members of transcription factor families were also identified. There were 952 DEGs considered as novel genes with no annotation in any databases. These unigenes will serve as an invaluable genetic resource for loquat molecular breeding and postharvest storage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ripening Control and Induction of the Defence and Antioxidant Systems)
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Open AccessArticle Tapirira guianensis Aubl. Extracts Inhibit Proliferation and Migration of Oral Cancer Cells Lines
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1839; doi:10.3390/ijms17111839
Received: 1 September 2016 / Revised: 11 October 2016 / Accepted: 12 October 2016 / Published: 8 November 2016
PDF Full-text (2582 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Cancer of the head and neck is a group of upper aerodigestive tract neoplasms in which aggressive treatments may cause harmful side effects to the patient. In the last decade, investigations on natural compounds have been particularly successful in the field of anticancer
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Cancer of the head and neck is a group of upper aerodigestive tract neoplasms in which aggressive treatments may cause harmful side effects to the patient. In the last decade, investigations on natural compounds have been particularly successful in the field of anticancer drug research. Our aim is to evaluate the antitumor effect of Tapirira guianensis Aubl. extracts on a panel of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines. Analysis of secondary metabolites classes in fractions of T. guianensis was performed using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). Mutagenicity effect was evaluated by Ames mutagenicity assay. The cytotoxic effect, and migration and invasion inhibition were measured. Additionally, the expression level of apoptosis-related molecules (PARP, Caspases 3, and Fas) and MMP-2 was detected using Western blot. Heterogeneous cytotoxicity response was observed for all fractions, which showed migration inhibition, reduced matrix degradation, and decreased cell invasion ability. Expression levels of MMP-2 decreased in all fractions, and particularly in the hexane fraction. Furthermore, overexpression of FAS and caspase-3, and increase of cleaved PARP indicates possible apoptosis extrinsic pathway activation. Antiproliferative activity of T. guianensis extract in HNSCC cells lines suggests the possibility of developing an anticancer agent or an additive with synergic activities associated with conventional anticancer therapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological Activity of Natural Secondary Metabolite Products)
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Open AccessArticle p-Hydroxyphenyl-pyranoanthocyanins: An Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Their Acid—Base Properties and Molecular Interactions
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1842; doi:10.3390/ijms17111842
Received: 26 September 2016 / Revised: 27 October 2016 / Accepted: 31 October 2016 / Published: 5 November 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (6934 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The physicochemical properties of the wine pigments catechyl-pyranomalvidin-3-O-glucoside (PA1) and guaiacyl-pyranomalvidin-3-O-glucoside (PA2) are extensively revisited using ultraviolet (UV)-visible spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and quantum chemistry density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In mildly acidic aqueous solution, each cationic pigment
[...] Read more.
The physicochemical properties of the wine pigments catechyl-pyranomalvidin-3-O-glucoside (PA1) and guaiacyl-pyranomalvidin-3-O-glucoside (PA2) are extensively revisited using ultraviolet (UV)-visible spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and quantum chemistry density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In mildly acidic aqueous solution, each cationic pigment undergoes regioselective deprotonation to form a single neutral quinonoid base and water addition appears negligible. Above pH = 4, both PA1 and PA2 become prone to aggregation, which is manifested by the slow build-up of broad absorption bands at longer wavelengths (λ ≥ 600 nm), followed in the case of PA2 by precipitation. Some phenolic copigments are able to inhibit aggregation of pyranoanthocyanins (PAs), although at large copigment/PA molar ratios. Thus, chlorogenic acid can dissociate PA1 aggregates while catechin is inactive. With PA2, both chlorogenic acid and catechin are able to prevent precipitation but not self-association. Calculations confirmed that the noncovalent dimerization of PAs is stronger with the neutral base than with the cation and also stronger than π–π stacking of PAs to chlorogenic acid (copigmentation). For each type of complex, the most stable conformation could be obtained. Finally, PA1 can also bind hard metal ions such as Al3+ and Fe3+ and the corresponding chelates are less prone to self-association. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anthocyanins)
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Open AccessArticle The Complete Mitochondrial Genome of Aleurocanthus camelliae: Insights into Gene Arrangement and Genome Organization within the Family Aleyrodidae
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1843; doi:10.3390/ijms17111843
Received: 14 July 2016 / Revised: 27 October 2016 / Accepted: 1 November 2016 / Published: 7 November 2016
PDF Full-text (2031 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
There are numerous gene rearrangements and transfer RNA gene absences existing in mitochondrial (mt) genomes of Aleyrodidae species. To understand how mt genomes evolved in the family Aleyrodidae, we have sequenced the complete mt genome of Aleurocanthus camelliae and comparatively analyzed all reported
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There are numerous gene rearrangements and transfer RNA gene absences existing in mitochondrial (mt) genomes of Aleyrodidae species. To understand how mt genomes evolved in the family Aleyrodidae, we have sequenced the complete mt genome of Aleurocanthus camelliae and comparatively analyzed all reported whitefly mt genomes. The mt genome of A. camelliae is 15,188 bp long, and consists of 13 protein-coding genes, two rRNA genes, 21 tRNA genes and a putative control region (GenBank: KU761949). The tRNA gene, trnI, has not been observed in this genome. The mt genome has a unique gene order and shares most gene boundaries with Tetraleurodes acaciae. Nineteen of 21 tRNA genes have the conventional cloverleaf shaped secondary structure and two (trnS1 and trnS2) lack the dihydrouridine (DHU) arm. Using ARWEN and homologous sequence alignment, we have identified five tRNA genes and revised the annotation for three whitefly mt genomes. This result suggests that most absent genes exist in the genomes and have not been identified, due to be lack of technology and inference sequence. The phylogenetic relationships among 11 whiteflies and Drosophila melanogaster were inferred by maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference methods. Aleurocanthus camelliae and T. acaciae form a sister group, and all three Bemisia tabaci and two Bemisia afer strains gather together. These results are identical to the relationships inferred from gene order. We inferred that gene rearrangement plays an important role in the mt genome evolved from whiteflies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Biochemistry, Molecular and Cellular Biology)
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Open AccessArticle Anti-Melanogenic Activities of Heracleum moellendorffii via ERK1/2-Mediated MITF Downregulation
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1844; doi:10.3390/ijms17111844
Received: 6 September 2016 / Revised: 27 October 2016 / Accepted: 31 October 2016 / Published: 4 November 2016
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (1424 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this study, the anti-melanogenic effects of Heracleum moellendorffii Hance extract (HmHe) and the mechanisms through which it inhibits melanogenesis in melan-a cells were investigated. Mushroom tyrosinase (TYR) activity and melanin content as well as cellular tyrosinase activity were measured in the cells.
[...] Read more.
In this study, the anti-melanogenic effects of Heracleum moellendorffii Hance extract (HmHe) and the mechanisms through which it inhibits melanogenesis in melan-a cells were investigated. Mushroom tyrosinase (TYR) activity and melanin content as well as cellular tyrosinase activity were measured in the cells. mRNA and protein expression of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), tyrosinase (TYR), TYR-related protein-1 (TYRP-1) and -2 were also examined. The results demonstrate that treatment with HmHe significantly inhibits mushroom tyrosinase activity. Furthermore, HmHe also markedly inhibits melanin production and intracellular tyrosinase activity. By suppressing the expression of TYR, TYRP-1, TYRP-2, and MITF, HmHe treatment antagonized melanin production in melan-a cells. Additionally, HmHe interfered with the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, with reversal of HmHe-induced melanogenesis inhibition after treatment with specific inhibitor U0126. In summary, HmHe can be said to stimulate ERK1/2 phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of MITF, resulting in suppression of melanogenic enzymes and melanin production, possibly due to the presence of polyphenolic compounds. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Cell-Free RNA Content in Peripheral Blood as Potential Biomarkers for Detecting Circulating Tumor Cells in Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1845; doi:10.3390/ijms17111845
Received: 16 August 2016 / Revised: 25 October 2016 / Accepted: 27 October 2016 / Published: 5 November 2016
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Abstract
Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have been implicated in tumor progression and prognosis. Techniques detecting CTCs in the peripheral blood of patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) may help to identify individuals likely to benefit from early systemic treatment. However, the detection of
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Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have been implicated in tumor progression and prognosis. Techniques detecting CTCs in the peripheral blood of patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) may help to identify individuals likely to benefit from early systemic treatment. However, the detection of CTCs with a single marker is challenging, owing to low specificity and sensitivity and due to the heterogeneity and rareness of CTCs. Herein, the probability of cell-free RNA content in the peripheral blood as a potential biomarker for detecting CTCs in cancer patients was investigated. An immunomagnetic enrichment of real-time reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR) technology for analysis of CTCs in NSCLC patients was also developed. The mRNA levels of four candidate genes, cytokeratin 7 (CK7), E74-like factor 3 (ELF3), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and erythropoietin-producing hepatocellular carcinoma receptor B4 (EphB4) that were significantly elevated in tumor tissues and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were determined. The expression of CK7 and ELF3 in tumor tissues and EGFR in PBMCs was associated with lymph node metastasis (all p < 0.05). The expression of CK7 in PBMCs was correlated with age and EphB4 in PBMCs correlated with histopathological type, respectively (all p < 0.05). The expression of all four genes in tumor tissues and PBMCs was significantly correlated with the clinical stage (all p < 0.01). Survival analysis showed that the patients with enhanced expression of CK7, ELF3, EGFR, and EphB4 mRNA in PBMCs had poorer disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) than those without (all p < 0.0001). The present study showed that this alteration of cell-free RNA content in peripheral blood might have clinical ramifications in the diagnosis and treatment of NSCLC patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Liquid Biopsy for Clinical Application)
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Open AccessArticle A Novel Role of Dickkopf-Related Protein 3 in Macropinocytosis in Human Bladder Cancer T24 Cells
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1846; doi:10.3390/ijms17111846
Received: 31 August 2016 / Revised: 1 November 2016 / Accepted: 2 November 2016 / Published: 5 November 2016
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Abstract
Dickkopf-related protein 3 (Dkk-3) is a potential tumor suppressor reported in various cancer entities. However, we found that Dkk-3 was exceptionally upregulated in bladder cancer T24 cells. To validate the biological role of Dkk-3 other than a tumor suppressor, we examined the function
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Dickkopf-related protein 3 (Dkk-3) is a potential tumor suppressor reported in various cancer entities. However, we found that Dkk-3 was exceptionally upregulated in bladder cancer T24 cells. To validate the biological role of Dkk-3 other than a tumor suppressor, we examined the function of Dkk-3 in T24 cells. Gene silencing of Dkk-3 inhibited cell growth through inducing G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest. Furthermore, Dkk-3 knock-down caused macropinocytosis accompanied by autophagy, which were canceled in part by their inhibitors 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl) amiloride (EIPA) and 3-methyladenine (3-MA). The macropinocytosis was induced by the Dkk-3 knock-down when there were sufficient extracellular nutrients. On the other hand, when the nutritional condition was poor, the autophagy was mainly induced by the Dkk-3 knock-down. These data indicated that Dkk-3 has a role in modulating macropinocytotic and autophagic pathways, a distinct function other than a Wnt antagonist. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Hydrostatic Compress Force Enhances the Viability and Decreases the Apoptosis of Condylar Chondrocytes through Integrin-FAK-ERK/PI3K Pathway
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1847; doi:10.3390/ijms17111847
Received: 29 July 2016 / Revised: 27 September 2016 / Accepted: 31 October 2016 / Published: 7 November 2016
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Abstract
Reduced mechanical stimuli in many pathological cases, such as hemimastication and limited masticatory movements, can significantly affect the metabolic activity of mandibular condylar chondrocytes and the growth of mandibles. However, the molecular mechanisms for these phenomena remain unclear. In this study, we hypothesized
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Reduced mechanical stimuli in many pathological cases, such as hemimastication and limited masticatory movements, can significantly affect the metabolic activity of mandibular condylar chondrocytes and the growth of mandibles. However, the molecular mechanisms for these phenomena remain unclear. In this study, we hypothesized that integrin-focal adhesion kinase (FAK)-ERK (extracellular signal–regulated kinase)/PI3K (phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase) signaling pathway mediated the cellular response of condylar chondrocytes to mechanical loading. Primary condylar chondrocytes were exposed to hydrostatic compressive forces (HCFs) of different magnitudes (0, 50, 100, 150, 200, and 250 kPa) for 2 h. We measured the viability, morphology, and apoptosis of the chondrocytes with different treatments as well as the gene, protein expression, and phosphorylation of mechanosensitivity-related molecules, such as integrin α2, integrin α5, integrin β1, FAK, ERK, and PI3K. HCFs could significantly increase the viability and surface area of condylar chondrocytes and decrease their apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. HCF of 250 kPa resulted in a 1.51 ± 0.02-fold increase of cell viability and reduced the ratio of apoptotic cells from 18.10% ± 0.56% to 7.30% ± 1.43%. HCFs could significantly enhance the mRNA and protein expression of integrin α2, integrin α5, and integrin β1 in a dose-dependent manner, but not ERK1, ERK2, or PI3K. Instead, HCF could significantly increase phosphorylation levels of FAK, ERK1/2, and PI3K in a dose-dependent manner. Cilengitide, the potent integrin inhibitor, could dose-dependently block such effects of HCFs. HCFs enhances the viability and decreases the apoptosis of condylar chondrocytes through the integrin-FAK-ERK/PI3K pathway. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Apoptotic Chondrocytes and Osteoarthritis)
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Open AccessArticle IBTK Differently Modulates Gene Expression and RNA Splicing in HeLa and K562 Cells
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1848; doi:10.3390/ijms17111848
Received: 22 July 2016 / Revised: 21 October 2016 / Accepted: 31 October 2016 / Published: 7 November 2016
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Abstract
The IBTK gene encodes the major protein isoform IBTKα that was recently characterized as substrate receptor of Cul3-dependent E3 ligase, regulating ubiquitination coupled to proteasomal degradation of Pdcd4, an inhibitor of translation. Due to the presence of Ankyrin-BTB-RCC1 domains that mediate several protein-protein
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The IBTK gene encodes the major protein isoform IBTKα that was recently characterized as substrate receptor of Cul3-dependent E3 ligase, regulating ubiquitination coupled to proteasomal degradation of Pdcd4, an inhibitor of translation. Due to the presence of Ankyrin-BTB-RCC1 domains that mediate several protein-protein interactions, IBTKα could exert expanded regulatory roles, including interaction with transcription regulators. To verify the effects of IBTKα on gene expression, we analyzed HeLa and K562 cell transcriptomes by RNA-Sequencing before and after IBTK knock-down by shRNA transduction. In HeLa cells, 1285 (2.03%) of 63,128 mapped transcripts were differentially expressed in IBTK-shRNA-transduced cells, as compared to cells treated with control-shRNA, with 587 upregulated (45.7%) and 698 downregulated (54.3%) RNAs. In K562 cells, 1959 (3.1%) of 63128 mapped RNAs were differentially expressed in IBTK-shRNA-transduced cells, including 1053 upregulated (53.7%) and 906 downregulated (46.3%). Only 137 transcripts (0.22%) were commonly deregulated by IBTK silencing in both HeLa and K562 cells, indicating that most IBTKα effects on gene expression are cell type-specific. Based on gene ontology classification, the genes responsive to IBTK are involved in different biological processes, including in particular chromatin and nucleosomal organization, gene expression regulation, and cellular traffic and migration. In addition, IBTK RNA interference affected RNA maturation in both cell lines, as shown by the evidence of alternative 3′- and 5′-splicing, mutually exclusive exons, retained introns, and skipped exons. Altogether, these results indicate that IBTK differently modulates gene expression and RNA splicing in HeLa and K562 cells, demonstrating a novel biological role of this protein. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Next-Generation Sequencing for Clinical Application)
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Open AccessArticle NOD Scid Gamma Mice Are Permissive to Allogeneic HSC Transplantation without Prior Conditioning
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1850; doi:10.3390/ijms17111850
Received: 10 August 2016 / Revised: 14 October 2016 / Accepted: 2 November 2016 / Published: 7 November 2016
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Abstract
Scid hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have an intrinsic defect in their maintenance within the bone marrow (BM) niche which facilitates HSC transplantation without the absolute requirement of prior conditioning. Nevertheless, NOD scid mice have a significantly altered life span due to early development
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Scid hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have an intrinsic defect in their maintenance within the bone marrow (BM) niche which facilitates HSC transplantation without the absolute requirement of prior conditioning. Nevertheless, NOD scid mice have a significantly altered life span due to early development of thymic lymphomas, which compromises the ability to study the long-term fate of exogenous HSCs and their progeny. Here, we present data on the transplantation of HSCs into NOD scid gamma (NSG) mice to achieve long-term engraftment without prior conditioning. We transplanted allogeneic HSCs constitutively expressing the mCherry fluorescent marker into age-matched NSG mice and assessed donor chimerism 6 months post-transplantation. All transplanted NSG mice showed long-term myeloid and lymphoid cell chimerism. Also, in vivo irradiated HSCs showed long-term engraftment, although overall white blood cell (WBC) donor chimerism was lower compared with non-irradiated HSCs. Using this novel NSG transplantation model, we will be able to study the effects of low dose in vivo X-ray exposure on the long-term fate of HSCs, without the requirement of prior radio-ablation of the recipient, and thus leaving the recipient’s BM microenvironment uncompromised. In conclusion, we demonstrated for the first time that allogeneic HSCs from a different inbred strain can compete for niches in the BM compartment of NSG mice. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection Radiation Toxicity in Cells)
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Open AccessArticle Fto-Deficiency Affects the Gene and MicroRNA Expression Involved in Brown Adipogenesis and Browning of White Adipose Tissue in Mice
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1851; doi:10.3390/ijms17111851
Received: 30 August 2016 / Revised: 1 November 2016 / Accepted: 2 November 2016 / Published: 7 November 2016
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Abstract
Genetic variants in the fat mass- and obesity-associated gene Fto are linked to the onset of obesity in humans. The causal role of the FTO protein in obesity is supported by evidence obtained from transgenic mice; however, the underlying molecular pathways pertaining to
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Genetic variants in the fat mass- and obesity-associated gene Fto are linked to the onset of obesity in humans. The causal role of the FTO protein in obesity is supported by evidence obtained from transgenic mice; however, the underlying molecular pathways pertaining to the role of FTO in obesity have yet to be established. In this study, we investigate the Fto gene in mouse brown adipose tissue and in the browning process of white adipose tissue. We analyze distinct structural and molecular factors in brown and white fat depots of Fto-deficient mice under normal and obesogenic conditions. We report significant alterations in the morphology of adipose tissue depots and the expression of mRNA and microRNA related to brown adipogenesis and metabolism in Fto-deficient mice. Furthermore, we show that high-fat feeding does not attenuate the browning process of Fto-deficient white adipose tissue as observed in wild-type tissue, suggesting a triggering effect of the FTO pathways by the dietary environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrigenomics of Risk Factors for Disease)
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Open AccessArticle X-Linked miRNAs Associated with Gender Differences in Rheumatoid Arthritis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1852; doi:10.3390/ijms17111852
Received: 22 August 2016 / Revised: 17 October 2016 / Accepted: 31 October 2016 / Published: 8 November 2016
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Abstract
Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease that predominantly affects women. MicroRNAs have emerged as crucial regulators of the immune system, whose expression is deregulated in RA. We aimed at quantifying the expression level of 14 miRNAs located on the X chromosome and
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Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease that predominantly affects women. MicroRNAs have emerged as crucial regulators of the immune system, whose expression is deregulated in RA. We aimed at quantifying the expression level of 14 miRNAs located on the X chromosome and at identifying whether differences are associated with disease and/or sex. A case–control study of 21 RA patients and 22 age- and sex-matched healthy controls was performed on peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The expression level of five miRNAs (miR-221, miR-222, miR-532, miR-106a, and miR-98) was significantly different between RA and controls when stratifying by sex, and the expression level of four miRNAs (miR-222, miR-532, miR-98, and miR-92a) was significantly different between RA females and males. The expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis revealed a significant gender effect of the FoxP3 promoter polymorphism rs3761548A/C on miR-221, miR-222 and miR-532 expression levels, and of the FoxP3 polymorphism rs2232365A/G on miR-221 expression levels in PBMC of RA patients. These data further support the involvement of the X chromosome in RA susceptibility. X-linked miRNAs, in the context of sex differences, might provide novel insight into new molecular mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets in RA for disease treatment and prevention. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection Regulation by Non-Coding RNAs)
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Open AccessArticle Use of Atomic Force Microscopy to Study the Multi-Modular Interaction of Bacterial Adhesins to Mucins
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1854; doi:10.3390/ijms17111854
Received: 9 September 2016 / Revised: 26 October 2016 / Accepted: 2 November 2016 / Published: 8 November 2016
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Abstract
The mucus layer covering the gastrointestinal (GI) epithelium is critical in selecting and maintaining homeostatic interactions with our gut bacteria. However, the molecular details of these interactions are not well understood. Here, we provide mechanistic insights into the adhesion properties of the canonical
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The mucus layer covering the gastrointestinal (GI) epithelium is critical in selecting and maintaining homeostatic interactions with our gut bacteria. However, the molecular details of these interactions are not well understood. Here, we provide mechanistic insights into the adhesion properties of the canonical mucus-binding protein (MUB), a large multi-repeat cell–surface adhesin found in Lactobacillus inhabiting the GI tract. We used atomic force microscopy to unravel the mechanism driving MUB-mediated adhesion to mucins. Using single-molecule force spectroscopy we showed that MUB displayed remarkable adhesive properties favouring a nanospring-like adhesion model between MUB and mucin mediated by unfolding of the multiple repeats constituting the adhesin. We obtained direct evidence for MUB self-interaction; MUB–MUB followed a similar binding pattern, confirming that MUB modular structure mediated such mechanism. This was in marked contrast with the mucin adhesion behaviour presented by Galectin-3 (Gal-3), a mammalian lectin characterised by a single carbohydrate binding domain (CRD). The binding mechanisms reported here perfectly match the particular structural organization of MUB, which maximizes interactions with the mucin glycan receptors through its long and linear multi-repeat structure, potentiating the retention of bacteria within the outer mucus layer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Glycan–Receptor Interaction)
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Open AccessArticle Bidirectional Estrogen-Like Effects of Genistein on Murine Experimental Autoimmune Ovarian Disease
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1855; doi:10.3390/ijms17111855
Received: 11 September 2016 / Revised: 23 October 2016 / Accepted: 1 November 2016 / Published: 8 November 2016
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Abstract
This study was to investigate the bidirectional estrogen-like effects of genistein on murine experimental autoimmune ovarian disease (AOD). Female BALB/c mice were induced by immunization with a peptide from murine zona pellucida. The changes of estrous cycle, ovarian histomorphology were measured, and the
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This study was to investigate the bidirectional estrogen-like effects of genistein on murine experimental autoimmune ovarian disease (AOD). Female BALB/c mice were induced by immunization with a peptide from murine zona pellucida. The changes of estrous cycle, ovarian histomorphology were measured, and the levels of serum sex hormone were analyzed using radioimmunoassay. Proliferative responses of the ovary were also determined by immunohistochemistry. Administration of 25 or 45 mg/kg body weight genistein enhanced ovary development with changes in serum sex hormone levels and proliferative responses. Meanwhile, the proportions of growing and mature follicles increased and the incidence of autoimmune oophoritis decreased, which exhibited normal ovarian morphology in administration of 25 or 45 mg/kg body weight genistein, while a lower dose (5 mg/kg body weight genistein) produced the opposite effect. These findings suggest that genistein exerts bidirectional estrogen-like effects on murine experimental AOD, while a high dose (45 mg/kg body weight) of genistein may suppress AOD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lipidomics and Glycomics: New Advances in Food Science and Nutrition)
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Open AccessArticle Systematic Analysis of Protein Interaction Network Associated with Azoospermia
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1857; doi:10.3390/ijms17111857
Received: 27 July 2016 / Revised: 19 October 2016 / Accepted: 1 November 2016 / Published: 10 November 2016
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Abstract
Non-obstructive azoospermia is a severe infertility factor. Currently, the etiology of this condition remains elusive with several possible molecular pathway disruptions identified in the post-meiotic spermatozoa. In the presented study, in order to identify all possible candidate genes associated with azoospermia and to
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Non-obstructive azoospermia is a severe infertility factor. Currently, the etiology of this condition remains elusive with several possible molecular pathway disruptions identified in the post-meiotic spermatozoa. In the presented study, in order to identify all possible candidate genes associated with azoospermia and to map their relationship, we present the first protein-protein interaction network related to azoospermia and analyze the complex effects of the related genes systematically. Using Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, the Human Protein Reference Database and Cytoscape, we created a novel network consisting of 209 protein nodes and 737 interactions. Mathematical analysis identified three proteins, ar, dazap2, and esr1, as hub nodes and a bottleneck protein within the network. We also identified new candidate genes, CREBBP and BCAR1, which may play a role in azoospermia. The gene ontology analysis suggests a genetic link between azoospermia and liver disease. The KEGG analysis also showed 45 statistically important pathways with 31 proteins associated with colorectal, pancreatic, chronic myeloid leukemia and prostate cancer. Two new genes and associated diseases are promising for further experimental validation. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection Proteins and Protein-Ligand Interactions)
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Open AccessArticle Low Expression of CAPON in Glioma Contributes to Cell Proliferation via the Akt Signaling Pathway
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1859; doi:10.3390/ijms17111859
Received: 22 August 2016 / Revised: 27 October 2016 / Accepted: 1 November 2016 / Published: 18 November 2016
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Abstract
CAPON is an adapter protein for nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS1). CAPON has two isoforms in the human brain: CAPON-L (long form of CAPON) and CAPON-S (short form of CAPON). Recent studies have indicated the involvement of CAPON in tumorigenesis beyond its classical
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CAPON is an adapter protein for nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS1). CAPON has two isoforms in the human brain: CAPON-L (long form of CAPON) and CAPON-S (short form of CAPON). Recent studies have indicated the involvement of CAPON in tumorigenesis beyond its classical role in NOS1 activity regulation. In this study, we found that the protein levels of CAPON-S, but not than CAPON-L, were significantly decreased in glioma tissues. Therefore, we established lentivirus-mediated stable cell lines with CAPON-S overexpression or down-regulation, and investigated the role of CAPON-S in the proliferation of glioma cells by using CCK8, EdU, and flow cytometry assays. Overexpression of CAPON-S reduced the cell variability and the percentage of EdU-positive cells, and arrested the cells in the G1 phase in glioma cells. Silencing of CAPON by short-hairpin RNA showed the opposite effects. Furthermore, an intracellular signaling array revealed that overexpression of CAPON-S resulted in a remarkable reduction in the phosphorylation of Akt and S6 ribosomal protein in glioma cells, which was further confirmed by Western blot. These findings suggest that CAPON may function as a tumor suppressor in human brain glioma and that the inactivation of the Akt signaling pathway caused by CAPON-S overexpression may provide insight into the underlying mechanism of CAPON in glioma cell proliferation. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection Advances in Molecular Oncology)
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Open AccessArticle Association between Interleukin-6 Promoter Polymorphism (-174 G/C), Serum Interleukin-6 Levels and Mortality in Severe Septic Patients
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1861; doi:10.3390/ijms17111861
Received: 24 August 2016 / Revised: 1 November 2016 / Accepted: 4 November 2016 / Published: 8 November 2016
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Abstract
The association between interleukin (IL)-6 promoter polymorphism (-174 G/C), circulating IL-6 levels and mortality in septic patients has scarcely been addressed, and then only in studies of small sample size, and a direct association among them has not been previously reported. Therefore, the
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The association between interleukin (IL)-6 promoter polymorphism (-174 G/C), circulating IL-6 levels and mortality in septic patients has scarcely been addressed, and then only in studies of small sample size, and a direct association among them has not been previously reported. Therefore, the purpose of our study was to determine whether this association exists. An observational, prospective and multicenter study including severe septic patients was undertaken and serum IL-6 levels at severe sepsis diagnosis and IL-6 promoter polymorphism (-174 G/C) were determined. The end-point of the study was 30-day mortality. The study included 263 patients with the following genotypes of IL-6 promoter polymorphism (-174 G/C): 123 (46.8%) GG, 110 (41.8%) GC and 30 (11.4%) CC. CC homozygous patients showed lower sepsis-related organ failure assessment (SOFA) score, serum IL-6 levels and mortality at 30 days compared to those with other genotypes (GC or GG). On regression analysis, CC homozygous patients showed lower 30-day mortality than those with genotype GG (odds ratio = 0.21; 95% CI = 0.053−0.838; p = 0.03) or GC (hazard ratio = 0.28; 95% CI = 0.074−1.037; p = 0.06). The most important results of our study were that CC might be a favorable genotype in septic patients showing lower serum IL-6 levels and lower risk of death within 30 days. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Molecular Pathology, Diagnostics, and Therapeutics)
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Open AccessArticle Classification of 27 Tumor-Associated Antigens by Histochemical Analysis of 36 Freshly Resected Lung Cancer Tissues
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1862; doi:10.3390/ijms17111862
Received: 9 September 2016 / Revised: 26 October 2016 / Accepted: 1 November 2016 / Published: 8 November 2016
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Abstract
In previous studies, we identified 29 tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) and isolated 488 human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that specifically bind to one of the 29 TAAs. In the present study, we performed histochemical analysis of 36 freshly resected lung cancer tissues by using 60
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In previous studies, we identified 29 tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) and isolated 488 human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that specifically bind to one of the 29 TAAs. In the present study, we performed histochemical analysis of 36 freshly resected lung cancer tissues by using 60 mAbs against 27 TAAs. Comparison of the staining patterns of tumor cells, bronchial epithelial cells, and normal pulmonary alveolus cells and interalveolar septum allowed us to determine the type and location of cells that express target molecules, as well as the degree of expression. The patterns were classified into 7 categories. While multiple Abs were used against certain TAAs, the differences observed among them should be derived from differences in the binding activity and/or the epitope. Thus, such data indicate the versatility of respective clones as anti-cancer drugs. Although the information obtained was limited to the lung and bronchial tube, bronchial epithelial cells represent normal growing cells, and therefore, the data are informative. The results indicate that 9 of the 27 TAAs are suitable targets for therapeutic Abs. These 9 Ags include EGFR, HER2, TfR, and integrin α6β4. Based on our findings, a pharmaceutical company has started to develop anti-cancer drugs by using Abs to TfR and integrin α6β4. HGFR, PTP-LAR, CD147, CDCP1, and integrin αvβ3 are also appropriate targets for therapeutic purposes. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Negative Glucocorticoid Response-Like Element from the First Intron of the Chicken Growth Hormone Gene Represses Gene Expression in the Rat Pituitary Tumor Cell Line
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1863; doi:10.3390/ijms17111863
Received: 28 July 2016 / Revised: 19 October 2016 / Accepted: 25 October 2016 / Published: 9 November 2016
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Abstract
The effects of introns, especially the first intron, on the regulation of gene expression remains unclear. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to investigate the transcriptional regulatory function of intron 1 on the chicken growth hormone (cGH) gene in
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The effects of introns, especially the first intron, on the regulation of gene expression remains unclear. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to investigate the transcriptional regulatory function of intron 1 on the chicken growth hormone (cGH) gene in the rat pituitary tumor cell line (GH4-C1). Transient transfection using first-intron-inserted cGH complete coding sequences (CDSs) and non-intron-inserted cGH CDS plasmids, quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and western blot assays were used to detect the expression of cGH. The reporter gene assay was also used to investigate the effect of a series of fragments in the first intron of cGH on gene expression in GH4-C1. All of the results revealed that a 200-bp fragment located in the +485/+684 region of intron 1 was essential for repressing the expression of cGH. Further informatics analysis showed that there was a cluster of 13 transcriptional factor binding sites (TFBSs) in the +485/+684 region of the cGH intron 1. Disruption of a glucocorticoid response-like element (the 19-nucleotide sequence 5′-AGGCTTGACAGTGACCTCC-3′) containing a T-box motif (TGACCT) located within this DNA fragment increased the expression of the reporter gene in GH4-C1. In addition, an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) revealed a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) protein of rat binding to the glucocorticoid response-like element. Together, these results indicate that there is a negative glucocorticoid response-like element (nGRE) located in the +591/+609 region within the first intron of cGH, which is essential for the down-regulation of cGH expression. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Biochemistry, Molecular and Cellular Biology)
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Open AccessArticle Berberine Alleviates Olanzapine-Induced Adipogenesis via the AMPKα–SREBP Pathway in 3T3-L1 Cells
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1865; doi:10.3390/ijms17111865
Received: 26 September 2016 / Revised: 1 November 2016 / Accepted: 4 November 2016 / Published: 9 November 2016
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (9421 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of berberine (BBR) on olanzapine (OLZ)-induced adipogenesis in a well-replicated 3T3-L1 cell model. Oil-Red-O (ORO) staining showed that BBR significantly decreased OLZ-induced adipogenesis. Co-treatment with OLZ and BBR decreased
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The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of berberine (BBR) on olanzapine (OLZ)-induced adipogenesis in a well-replicated 3T3-L1 cell model. Oil-Red-O (ORO) staining showed that BBR significantly decreased OLZ-induced adipogenesis. Co-treatment with OLZ and BBR decreased the accumulation of triglyceride (TG) and total cholesterol (TC) by 55.58% ± 3.65% and 49.84% ± 8.31%, respectively, in 3T3-L1 adipocytes accompanied by reduced expression of Sterol regulatory element binding proteins 1 (SREBP1), fatty acid synthase (FAS), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), SREBP2, low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), and hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) genes compared with OLZ alone. Consistently, the co-treatment downregulated protein levels of SREBP1, SREBP2, and LDLR by 57.71% ± 9.42%, 73.05% ± 11.82%, and 59.46% ± 9.91%, respectively. In addition, co-treatment reversed the phosphorylation level of AMP-activated protein kinase-α (AMPKα), which was reduced by OLZ, determined via the ratio of pAMPKα:AMPKα (94.1%) compared with OLZ alone. The results showed that BBR may prevent lipid metabolism disorders caused by OLZ by reversing the degree of SREBP pathway upregulated and the phosphorylation of AMPKα downregulated. Collectively, these results indicated that BBR could be used as a potential adjuvant to prevent dyslipidemia and obesity caused by the use of second-generation antipsychotic medication. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Bioactives and Nutraceuticals)
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Open AccessArticle Pharmacologic Treatment Assigned for Niemann Pick Type C1 Disease Partly Changes Behavioral Traits in Wild-Type Mice
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1866; doi:10.3390/ijms17111866
Received: 26 September 2016 / Revised: 28 October 2016 / Accepted: 3 November 2016 / Published: 9 November 2016
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Abstract
Niemann-Pick Type C1 (NPC1) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder characterized by accumulation of cholesterol and glycosphingolipids. Previously, we demonstrated that BALB/c-npc1nihNpc1−/− mice treated with miglustat, cyclodextrin and allopregnanolone generally performed better than untreated Npc1−/− animals. Unexpectedly, they also
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Niemann-Pick Type C1 (NPC1) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder characterized by accumulation of cholesterol and glycosphingolipids. Previously, we demonstrated that BALB/c-npc1nihNpc1−/− mice treated with miglustat, cyclodextrin and allopregnanolone generally performed better than untreated Npc1−/− animals. Unexpectedly, they also seemed to accomplish motor tests better than their sham-treated wild-type littermates. However, combination-treated mutant mice displayed worse cognition performance compared to sham-treated ones. To evaluate effects of these drugs in healthy BALB/c mice, we here analyzed pharmacologic effects on motor and cognitive behavior of wild-type mice. For combination treatment mice were injected with allopregnanolone/cyclodextrin weekly, starting at P7. Miglustat injections were performed daily from P10 till P23. Starting at P23, miglustat was embedded in the chow. Other mice were treated with miglustat only, or sham-treated. The battery of behavioral tests consisted of accelerod, Morris water maze, elevated plus maze, open field and hot-plate tests. Motor capabilities and spontaneous motor behavior were unaltered in both drug-treated groups. Miglustat-treated wild-type mice displayed impaired spatial learning compared to sham- and combination-treated mice. Both combination- and miglustat-treated mice showed enhanced anxiety in the elevated plus maze compared to sham-treated mice. Additionally, combination treatment as well as miglustat alone significantly reduced brain weight, whereas only combination treatment reduced body weight significantly. Our results suggest that allopregnanolone/cyclodextrin ameliorate most side effects of miglustat in wild-type mice. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Tonsil-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Differentiate into a Schwann Cell Phenotype and Promote Peripheral Nerve Regeneration
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1867; doi:10.3390/ijms17111867
Received: 23 August 2016 / Revised: 2 November 2016 / Accepted: 4 November 2016 / Published: 9 November 2016
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Abstract
Schwann cells (SCs), which produce neurotropic factors and adhesive molecules, have been reported previously to contribute to structural support and guidance during axonal regeneration; therefore, they are potentially a crucial target in the restoration of injured nervous tissues. Autologous SC transplantation has been
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Schwann cells (SCs), which produce neurotropic factors and adhesive molecules, have been reported previously to contribute to structural support and guidance during axonal regeneration; therefore, they are potentially a crucial target in the restoration of injured nervous tissues. Autologous SC transplantation has been performed and has shown promising clinical results for treating nerve injuries and donor site morbidity, and insufficient production of the cells have been considered as a major issue. Here, we performed differentiation of tonsil-derived mesenchymal stem cells (T-MSCs) into SC-like cells (T-MSC-SCs), to evaluate T-MSC-SCs as an alternative to SCs. Using SC markers such as CAD19, GFAP, MBP, NGFR, S100B, and KROX20 during quantitative real-time PCR we detected the upregulation of NGFR, S100B, and KROX20 and the downregulation of CAD19 and MBP at the fully differentiated stage. Furthermore, we found myelination of axons when differentiated SCs were cocultured with mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons. The application of T-MSC-SCs to a mouse model of sciatic nerve injury produced marked improvements in gait and promoted regeneration of damaged nerves. Thus, the transplantation of human T-MSCs might be suitable for assisting in peripheral nerve regeneration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Peripheral Nerve Regeneration: From Bench to Bedside)
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Open AccessArticle Stearoyl-CoA Desaturase-1 Protects Cells against Lipotoxicity-Mediated Apoptosis in Proximal Tubular Cells
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1868; doi:10.3390/ijms17111868
Received: 12 September 2016 / Revised: 31 October 2016 / Accepted: 3 November 2016 / Published: 9 November 2016
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Abstract
Saturated fatty acid (SFA)-related lipotoxicity is a pathogenesis of diabetes-related renal proximal tubular epithelial cell (PTEC) damage, closely associated with a progressive decline in renal function. This study was designed to identify a free fatty acid (FFA) metabolism-related enzyme that can protect PTECs
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Saturated fatty acid (SFA)-related lipotoxicity is a pathogenesis of diabetes-related renal proximal tubular epithelial cell (PTEC) damage, closely associated with a progressive decline in renal function. This study was designed to identify a free fatty acid (FFA) metabolism-related enzyme that can protect PTECs from SFA-related lipotoxicity. Among several enzymes involved in FFA metabolism, we identified stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1), whose expression level significantly decreased in the kidneys of high-fat diet (HFD)-induced diabetic mice, compared with non-diabetic mice. SCD1 is an enzyme that desaturates SFAs, converting them to monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs), leading to the formation of neutral lipid droplets. In culture, retrovirus-mediated overexpression of SCD1 or MUFA treatment significantly ameliorated SFA-induced apoptosis in PTECs by enhancing intracellular lipid droplet formation. In contrast, siRNA against SCD1 exacerbated the apoptosis. Both overexpression of SCD1 and MUFA treatment reduced SFA-induced apoptosis via reducing endoplasmic reticulum stress in cultured PTECs. Thus, HFD-induced decrease in renal SCD1 expression may play a pathogenic role in lipotoxicity-induced renal injury, and enhancing SCD1-mediated desaturation of SFA and subsequent formation of neutral lipid droplets may become a promising therapeutic target to reduce SFA-induced lipotoxicity. The present study provides a novel insight into lipotoxicity in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diabetic Complications: Pathophysiology, Mechanisms, and Therapies)
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Open AccessArticle Brefeldin A-Inhibited Guanine Nucleotide-Exchange Factor 1 (BIG1) Governs the Recruitment of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-Associated Factor 2 (TRAF2) to Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 1 (TNFR1) Signaling Complexes
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1869; doi:10.3390/ijms17111869
Received: 26 September 2016 / Revised: 26 October 2016 / Accepted: 2 November 2016 / Published: 9 November 2016
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Abstract
Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2) is a critical mediator of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) signaling. However, the regulatory mechanisms of TRAF2 are not fully understood. Here we show evidence that TRAF2 requires brefeldin A-inhibited guanine nucleotide-exchange factor 1 (BIG1) to be
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Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2) is a critical mediator of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) signaling. However, the regulatory mechanisms of TRAF2 are not fully understood. Here we show evidence that TRAF2 requires brefeldin A-inhibited guanine nucleotide-exchange factor 1 (BIG1) to be recruited into TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) signaling complexes. In BIG1 knockdown cells, TNF-α-induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation was attenuated and the sensitivity to TNF-α-induced apoptosis was increased. Since these trends correlated well with those of TRAF2 deficient cells as previously demonstrated, we tested whether BIG1 functions as an upstream regulator of TRAF2 in TNFR1 signaling. As expected, we found that knockdown of BIG1 suppressed TNF-α-dependent ubiquitination of TRAF2 that is required for JNK activation, and impaired the recruitment of TRAF2 to the TNFR1 signaling complex (complex I). Moreover, we found that the recruitment of TRAF2 to the death-inducing signaling complex termed complex II was also impaired in BIG1 knockdown cells. These results suggest that BIG1 is a key component of the machinery that drives TRAF2 to the signaling complexes formed after TNFR1 activation. Thus, our data demonstrate a novel and unexpected function of BIG1 that regulates TNFR1 signaling by targeting TRAF2. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Kinase Signal Transduction)
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Open AccessArticle A Precision Microbiome Approach Using Sucrose for Selective Augmentation of Staphylococcus epidermidis Fermentation against Propionibacterium acnes
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1870; doi:10.3390/ijms17111870
Received: 5 August 2016 / Revised: 17 October 2016 / Accepted: 31 October 2016 / Published: 9 November 2016
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Abstract
Acne dysbiosis happens when there is a microbial imbalance of the over-growth of Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) in the acne microbiome. In our previous study, we demonstrated that Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis, a probiotic skin bacterium) can exploit
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Acne dysbiosis happens when there is a microbial imbalance of the over-growth of Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) in the acne microbiome. In our previous study, we demonstrated that Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis, a probiotic skin bacterium) can exploit glycerol fermentation to produce short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) which have antimicrobial activities to suppress the growth of P. acnes. Unlike glycerol, sucrose is chosen here as a selective fermentation initiator (SFI) that can specifically intensify the fermentation activity of S. epidermidis, but not P. acnes. A co-culture of P. acnes and fermenting S. epidermidis in the presence of sucrose significantly led to a reduction in the growth of P. acnes. The reduction was abolished when P. acnes was co-cultured with non-fermenting S. epidermidis. Results from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis revealed four SCFAs (acetic acid, butyric acid, lactic acid, and succinic acid) were detectable in the media of S. epidermidis sucrose fermentation. To validate the interference of S. epidermidis sucrose fermentation with P. acnes, mouse ears were injected with both P. acnes and S. epidermidis plus sucrose or phosphate buffered saline (PBS). The level of macrophage-inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) and the number of P. acnes in ears injected with two bacteria plus sucrose were considerably lower than those in ears injected with two bacteria plus PBS. Our results demonstrate a precision microbiome approach by using sucrose as a SFI for S. epidermidis, holding future potential as a novel modality to equilibrate dysbiotic acne. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inflammatory Skin Conditions)
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Open AccessArticle Response Surface Methodology Modelling of an Aqueous Two-Phase System for Purification of Protease from Penicillium candidum (PCA 1/TT031) under Solid State Fermentation and Its Biochemical Characterization
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1872; doi:10.3390/ijms17111872
Received: 3 September 2016 / Revised: 1 November 2016 / Accepted: 3 November 2016 / Published: 11 November 2016
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Abstract
Penicillium candidum (PCA 1/TT031) synthesizes different types of extracellular proteases. The objective of this study is to optimize polyethylene glycol (PEG)/citrate based on an aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) and Response Surface Methodology (RSM) to purify protease from Penicillium candidum (PCA 1/TT031). The effects
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Penicillium candidum (PCA 1/TT031) synthesizes different types of extracellular proteases. The objective of this study is to optimize polyethylene glycol (PEG)/citrate based on an aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) and Response Surface Methodology (RSM) to purify protease from Penicillium candidum (PCA 1/TT031). The effects of different PEG molecular weights (1500–10,000 g/mol), PEG concentration (9%–20%), concentrations of NaCl (0%–10%) and the citrate buffer (8%–16%) on protease were also studied. The best protease purification could be achieved under the conditions of 9.0% (w/w) PEG 8000, 5.2% NaCl, and 15.9% sodium citrate concentration, which resulted in a one-sided protease partitioning for the bottom phase with a partition coefficient of 0.2, a 6.8-fold protease purification factor, and a yield of 93%. The response surface models displayed a significant (p ≤ 0.05) response which was fit for the variables that were studied as well as a high coefficient of determination (R2). Similarly, the predicted and observed values displayed no significant (p > 0.05) differences. In addition, our enzyme characterization study revealed that Penicillium candidum (PCA 1/TT031) produced a slight neutral protease with a molecular weight between 100 and 140 kDa. The optimal activity of the purified enzyme occurred at a pH of 6.0 and at a temperature of 50 °C. The stability between different pH and temperature ranges along with the effect of chemical metal ions and inhibitors were also studied. Our results reveal that the purified enzyme could be used in the dairy industry such as in accelerated cheese ripening. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Physical Chemistry, Theoretical and Computational Chemistry)
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Open AccessArticle MicroRNAs 10a and 10b Regulate the Expression of Human Platelet Glycoprotein Ibα for Normal Megakaryopoiesis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1873; doi:10.3390/ijms17111873
Received: 17 August 2016 / Revised: 3 October 2016 / Accepted: 3 November 2016 / Published: 9 November 2016
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Abstract
MicroRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs that bind to the three prime untranslated region (3′-UTR) of target mRNAs. They cause a cleavage or an inhibition of the translation of target mRNAs, thus regulating gene expression. Here, we employed three prediction tools
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MicroRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs that bind to the three prime untranslated region (3′-UTR) of target mRNAs. They cause a cleavage or an inhibition of the translation of target mRNAs, thus regulating gene expression. Here, we employed three prediction tools to search for potential miRNA target sites in the 3′-UTR of the human platelet glycoprotein (GP) 1BA gene. A luciferase reporter assay shows that miR-10a and -10b sites are functional. When miR-10a or -10b mimics were transfected into the GP Ibβ/GP IX-expressing cells, along with a DNA construct harboring both the coding and 3′-UTR sequences of the human GP1BA gene, we found that they inhibit the transient expression of GP Ibα on the cell surface. When the miR-10a or -10b mimics were introduced into murine progenitor cells, upon megakaryocyte differentiation, we found that GP Ibα mRNA expression was markedly reduced, suggesting that a miRNA-induced mRNA degradation is at work. Thus, our study identifies GP Ibα as a novel target of miR-10a and -10b, suggesting that a drastic reduction in the levels of miR-10a and -10b in the late stage of megakaryopoiesis is required to allow the expression of human GP Ibα and the formation of the GP Ib-IX-V complex. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection Regulation by Non-Coding RNAs)
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Open AccessArticle Potential Role of Methylation Marker in Glioma Supporting Clinical Decisions
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1876; doi:10.3390/ijms17111876
Received: 16 September 2016 / Revised: 27 October 2016 / Accepted: 4 November 2016 / Published: 10 November 2016
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Abstract
The IDH1/2 gene mutations, ATRX loss/mutation, 1p/19q status, and MGMT promoter methylation are increasingly used as prognostic or predictive biomarkers of gliomas. However, the effect of their combination on radiation therapy outcome is discussable. Previously, we demonstrated that the IDH1 c.G395A; p.R132H
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The IDH1/2 gene mutations, ATRX loss/mutation, 1p/19q status, and MGMT promoter methylation are increasingly used as prognostic or predictive biomarkers of gliomas. However, the effect of their combination on radiation therapy outcome is discussable. Previously, we demonstrated that the IDH1 c.G395A; p.R132H mutation was associated with longer survival in grade II astrocytoma and GBM (Glioblastoma). Here we analyzed the MGMT promoter methylation status in patients with a known mutation status in codon 132 of IDH1, followed by clinical and genetic data analysis based on the two statuses. After a subtotal tumor resection, the patients were treated using IMRT (Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy) with 6 MeV photons. The total dose was: 54 Gy for astrocytoma II, 60 Gy for astrocytoma III, 60 Gy for glioblastoma, 2 Gy per day, with 24 h intervals, five days per week. The patients with MGMT promoter methylation and IDH1 somatic mutation (OS = 40 months) had a better prognosis than those with MGMT methylation alone (OS = 18 months). In patients with astrocytoma anaplasticum (n = 7) with the IDH1 p.R132H mutation and hypermethylated MGMT, the prognosis was particularly favorable (median OS = 47 months). In patients with astrocytoma II meeting the above criteria, the prognosis was also better than in those not meeting those criteria. The IDH1 mutation appears more relevant for the prognosis than MGMT methylation. The IDH1 p.R132H mutation combined with MGMT hypermethylation seems to be the most advantageous for treatment success. Patients not meeting those criteria may require more aggressive treatments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Biochemistry, Molecular and Cellular Biology)
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Open AccessArticle Increased Expression Profile and Functionality of TLR6 in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and Hepatocytes of Morbidly Obese Patients with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1878; doi:10.3390/ijms17111878
Received: 14 September 2016 / Revised: 31 October 2016 / Accepted: 2 November 2016 / Published: 10 November 2016
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Abstract
Current evidence suggests that gut dysbiosis drives obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) pathogenesis. Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and TLR6 specifically recognize components of Gram-positive bacteria. Despite the potential implications of TLR2 in NAFLD pathogenesis, the role of TLR6 has not been
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Current evidence suggests that gut dysbiosis drives obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) pathogenesis. Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and TLR6 specifically recognize components of Gram-positive bacteria. Despite the potential implications of TLR2 in NAFLD pathogenesis, the role of TLR6 has not been addressed. Our aim is to study a potential role of TLR6 in obesity-related NAFLD. Forty morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery were prospectively studied. Cell surface expression of TLR2 and TLR6 was assessed on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) by flow cytometry. Freshly isolated monocytes were cultured with specific TLR2/TLR6 agonists and intracellular production of cytokines was determined by flow-cytometry. In liver biopsies, the expression of TLR2 and TLR6 was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and cytokine gene expression using RT-qPCR. TLR6 expression in PBMCs from non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) patients was significantly higher when compared to those from simple steatosis. The production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to TLR2/TLR6 stimulation was also significantly higher in patients with lobular inflammation. Hepatocyte expression of TLR6 but not that of TLR2 was increased in NAFLD patients compared to normal liver histology. Deregulated expression and activity of peripheral TLR6 in morbidly obese patients can mirror the liver inflammatory events that are well known drivers of obesity-related NASH pathogenesis. Moreover, TLR6 is also significantly overexpressed in the hepatocytes of NAFLD patients compared to their normal counterparts. Thus, deregulated TLR6 expression may potentiate TLR2-mediated liver inflammation in NAFLD pathogenesis, and also serve as a potential peripheral biomarker of obesity-related NASH. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection Molecular Mechanisms of Human Liver Diseases)
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Open AccessArticle Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) as Predicting Marker for Clinical Outcome and Evaluation of Early Toxicity Rate after High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy (HDR-BT) in Combination with Additional External Beam Radiation Therapy (EBRT) for High Risk Prostate Cancer
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1879; doi:10.3390/ijms17111879
Received: 12 September 2016 / Revised: 17 October 2016 / Accepted: 4 November 2016 / Published: 10 November 2016
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Abstract
High-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) is a common treatment option for locally advanced prostate cancer (PCa). Seventy-nine male patients (median age 71 years, range 50 to 79) with high-risk PCa underwent HDR-BT following EBRT between December 2009 and January
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High-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) is a common treatment option for locally advanced prostate cancer (PCa). Seventy-nine male patients (median age 71 years, range 50 to 79) with high-risk PCa underwent HDR-BT following EBRT between December 2009 and January 2016 with a median follow-up of 21 months. HDR-BT was administered in two treatment sessions (one week interval) with 9 Gy per fraction using a planning system and the Ir192 treatment unit GammaMed Plus iX. EBRT was performed with CT-based 3D-conformal treatment planning with a total dose administration of 50.4 Gy with 1.8 Gy per fraction and five fractions per week. Follow-up for all patients was organized one, three, and five years after radiation therapy to evaluate early and late toxicity side effects, metastases, local recurrence, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value measured in ng/mL. The evaluated data included age, PSA at time of diagnosis, PSA density, BMI (body mass index), Gleason score, D’Amico risk classification for PCa, digital rectal examination (DRE), PSA value after one/three/five year(s) follow-up (FU), time of follow-up, TNM classification, prostate volume, and early toxicity rates. Early toxicity rates were 8.86% for gastrointestinal, and 6.33% for genitourinary side effects. Of all treated patients, 84.81% had no side effects. All reported complications in early toxicity were grade 1. PSA density at time of diagnosis (p = 0.009), PSA on date of first HDR-BT (p = 0.033), and PSA on date of first follow-up after one year (p = 0.025) have statistical significance on a higher risk to get a local recurrence during follow-up. HDR-BT in combination with additional EBRT in the presented design for high-risk PCa results in high biochemical control rates with minimal side-effects. PSA is a negative predictive biomarker for local recurrence during follow-up. A longer follow-up is needed to assess long-term outcome and toxicities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diagnostic, Prognostic and Predictive Biomarkers in Prostate Cancer)
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Open AccessArticle A Melting Curve-Based Multiplex RT-qPCR Assay for Simultaneous Detection of Four Human Coronaviruses
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2016, 17(11), 1880; doi:10.3390/ijms17111880
Received: 21 July 2016 / Revised: 30 October 2016 / Accepted: 1 November 2016 / Published: 23 November 2016
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Abstract
Human coronaviruses HCoV-OC43, HCoV-229E, HCoV-NL63 and HCoV-HKU1 are common respiratory viruses associated with acute respiratory infection. They have a global distribution. Rapid and accurate diagnosis of HCoV infection is important for the management and treatment of hospitalized patients with HCoV infection. Here, we
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Human coronaviruses HCoV-OC43, HCoV-229E, HCoV-NL63 and HCoV-HKU1 are common respiratory viruses associated with acute respiratory infection. They have a global distribution. Rapid and accurate diagnosis of HCoV infection is important for the management and treatment of hospitalized patients with HCoV infection. Here, we developed a melting curve-based multiplex RT-qPCR assay for simultaneous detection of the four HCoVs. In the assay, SYTO 9 was used to replace SYBR Green I as the fluorescent dye, and GC-modified primers were designed to improve the melting temperature (Tm) of the specific amplicon. The four HCoVs were clearly distinguished by characteristic melting peaks in melting curve analysis. The detection sensitivity of the assay was 3 × 102 copies for HCoV-OC43, and 3 × 101 copies for HCoV-NL63, HCoV-229E and HCoV-HKU1 per 30 μL reaction. Clinical evaluation and sequencing confirmation demonstrated that the assay was specific and reliable. The assay represents a sensitive and reliable method for diagnosis of HCoV infection in clinical samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Molecular Pathology, Diagnostics, and Therapeutics)
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