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Pharmaceuticals, Volume 7, Issue 5 (May 2014), Pages 502-633

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Enhanced Antimicrobial Activity of AamAP1-Lysine, a Novel Synthetic Peptide Analog Derived from the Scorpion Venom Peptide AamAP1
Pharmaceuticals 2014, 7(5), 502-516; doi:10.3390/ph7050502
Received: 7 March 2014 / Revised: 9 April 2014 / Accepted: 14 April 2014 / Published: 25 April 2014
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (307 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
There is great interest in the development of antimicrobial peptides as a potentially novel class of antimicrobial agents. Several structural determinants are responsible for the antimicrobial and cytolytic activity of antimicrobial peptides. In our study, a new synthetic peptide analog, AamAP1-Lysine from the
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There is great interest in the development of antimicrobial peptides as a potentially novel class of antimicrobial agents. Several structural determinants are responsible for the antimicrobial and cytolytic activity of antimicrobial peptides. In our study, a new synthetic peptide analog, AamAP1-Lysine from the naturally occurring scorpion venom antimicrobial peptide AamAP1, was designed by modifying the parent peptide in order to increase the positive charge and optimize other physico-chemical parameters involved in antimicrobial activity. AamAP1-Lysine displayed potent antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The minimum inhibitory concentration was in the range of 5 to 15 µM with a 10 fold increase in potency over the parent peptide. The hemolytic and antiproliferative activity of AamAP1-Lysine against eukaryotic mammalian cells was minimal at the concentration range needed to inhibit bacterial growth. The antibacterial mechanism analysis indicated that AamAP1-Lysine is probably inducing bacterial cell death through membrane damage and permeabilization determined by the release of β-galactosidase enzyme from peptide treated E. coli cells. DNA binding studies revealed that AamAP1-Lysine caused complete retardation of DNA migration and could display intracellular activities in addition to the membrane permeabilization mode of action reported earlier. In conclusion, AamAP1-Lysine could prove to be a potential candidate for antimicrobial drug development in future studies. Full article
Open AccessArticle Synthesis, Radiolabelling and In Vitro Characterization of the Gallium-68-, Yttrium-90- and Lutetium-177-Labelled PSMA Ligand, CHX-A''-DTPA-DUPA-Pep
Pharmaceuticals 2014, 7(5), 517-529; doi:10.3390/ph7050517
Received: 16 December 2013 / Revised: 27 March 2014 / Accepted: 14 April 2014 / Published: 29 April 2014
Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (353 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Since prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) has been identified as a diagnostic target for prostate cancer, many urea-based small PSMA-targeting molecules were developed. First, the clinical application of these Ga-68 labelled compounds in positron emission tomography (PET) showed their diagnostic potential. Besides, the therapy
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Since prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) has been identified as a diagnostic target for prostate cancer, many urea-based small PSMA-targeting molecules were developed. First, the clinical application of these Ga-68 labelled compounds in positron emission tomography (PET) showed their diagnostic potential. Besides, the therapy of prostate cancer is a demanding field, and the use of radiometals with PSMA bearing ligands is a valid approach. In this work, we describe the synthesis of a new PSMA ligand, CHX-A''-DTPA-DUPA-Pep, the subsequent labelling with Ga-68, Lu-177 and Y-90 and the first in vitro characterization. In cell investigations with PSMA-positive LNCaP C4-2 cells, KD values of ≤14.67 ± 1.95 nM were determined, indicating high biological activities towards PSMA. Radiosyntheses with Ga-68, Lu-177 and Y-90 were developed under mild reaction conditions (room temperature, moderate pH of 5.5 and 7.4, respectively) and resulted in nearly quantitative radiochemical yields within 5 min. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry between Imaging and Radioendotherapy)
Open AccessArticle Barriers to the Access and Use of Rituximab in Patients with Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: A Physician Survey
Pharmaceuticals 2014, 7(5), 530-544; doi:10.3390/ph7050530
Received: 23 December 2013 / Revised: 25 March 2014 / Accepted: 29 April 2014 / Published: 7 May 2014
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (135 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Biologics such as rituximab are an important component of oncology treatment strategies, although access to such therapies is challenging in countries with limited resources. This study examined access to rituximab and identified potential barriers to its use in the United States, Mexico, Turkey,
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Biologics such as rituximab are an important component of oncology treatment strategies, although access to such therapies is challenging in countries with limited resources. This study examined access to rituximab and identified potential barriers to its use in the United States, Mexico, Turkey, Russia, and Brazil. The study also examined whether availability of a biosimilar to rituximab would improve access to, and use of, rituximab. Overall, 450 hematologists and oncologists completed a survey examining their use of rituximab in patients with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Less than 40% of physicians considered rituximab as easy to access from a cost perspective. Furthermore, many physicians chose not to treat, were unable to treat, or had to modify treatment with rituximab despite guidelines recommending its use in NHL and CLL patients. Insurance coverage, reimbursement, and cost to patient were commonly reported as barriers to the use of rituximab. Across all markets, over half of physicians reported that they would increase use of rituximab if a biosimilar was available. We conclude that rituximab use would increase across all therapy types and markets if a biosimilar was available, although a biosimilar would have the greatest impact in Brazil, Mexico, and Russia. Full article
Open AccessArticle Synthesis, Screening and Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Potential Prodrugs of Bupropion. Part One: In Vitro Development
Pharmaceuticals 2014, 7(5), 595-620; doi:10.3390/ph7050595
Received: 13 March 2014 / Revised: 30 April 2014 / Accepted: 8 May 2014 / Published: 14 May 2014
PDF Full-text (653 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
In general, prodrugs are developed to circumvent deficiencies associated with the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion or toxicological (ADMET) profile associated with the active drug. In our study, we select bupropion, a drug with broad pharmacology incorporating dopaminergic, noradrenergic, nicotinic and cytokine modulation properties,
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In general, prodrugs are developed to circumvent deficiencies associated with the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion or toxicological (ADMET) profile associated with the active drug. In our study, we select bupropion, a drug with broad pharmacology incorporating dopaminergic, noradrenergic, nicotinic and cytokine modulation properties, but which is rapidly metabolized in vivo. we exploited its carbonyl and secondary amine functionality to facilitate the synthesis of bioprecursor prodrug forms with the sole objective of identifying analogues with enhanced properties over bupropion. A range of analogues were synthesized, ranging from N-methyl, N-benzyl, oximes, enol acetate and ether forms to examples where both functional groups were utilized to form oxadiazine, oxadiazinone, oxazolone and acetylated derivatives. we then developed an in vitro metabolic screen to simulate the human oral delivery route for these analogues. The selection of media in the screens contained a variety of pH, enzymatic and co-factor systems which mimic metabolic in vivo environments that drugs encounter when delivered orally. By coupling our in vitro screening tool to a selective hyphenated technique such as LC-MS, we were able to quickly select potential prodrugs for further in vitro and in vivo development. From the data generated, the N-alkylated bupropion analogues were shown to have the highest potential to act as bioprecursor prodrugs of bupropion. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection Prodrugs: from Design to Clinic)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Development and Successful Validation of Simple and Fast TLC Spot Tests for Determination of Kryptofix® 2.2.2 and Tetrabutylammonium in 18F-Labeled Radiopharmaceuticals
Pharmaceuticals 2014, 7(5), 621-633; doi:10.3390/ph7050621
Received: 12 February 2014 / Revised: 1 May 2014 / Accepted: 7 May 2014 / Published: 14 May 2014
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (286 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Kryptofix® 2.2.2 (Kry) or tetrabutylammonium (TBA) are commonly used as phase transfer catalysts in 18F-radiopharmaceutical productions for positron emission tomography (PET). Due to their toxicity, quality control has to be performed before administration of the tracer to assure that limit concentration
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Kryptofix® 2.2.2 (Kry) or tetrabutylammonium (TBA) are commonly used as phase transfer catalysts in 18F-radiopharmaceutical productions for positron emission tomography (PET). Due to their toxicity, quality control has to be performed before administration of the tracer to assure that limit concentration of residual reagent is not reached. Here, we describe the successful development and pharmaceutical validation (for specificity, accuracy and detection limit) of a simplified color spot test on TLC plates. We were able to prove its applicability as a general, time and resources saving, easy to handle and reliable method in daily routine analyzing 18F-tracer formulations for Kry (in [18F]FDG or [18F]FECh) or TBA contaminations (in [18F]FLT) with special regard to complex matrix compositions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry between Imaging and Radioendotherapy)

Review

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Open AccessReview Human Antimicrobial Peptides and Proteins
Pharmaceuticals 2014, 7(5), 545-594; doi:10.3390/ph7050545
Received: 17 January 2014 / Revised: 15 April 2014 / Accepted: 29 April 2014 / Published: 13 May 2014
Cited by 54 | PDF Full-text (1131 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
As the key components of innate immunity, human host defense antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs) play a critical role in warding off invading microbial pathogens. In addition, AMPs can possess other biological functions such as apoptosis, wound healing, and immune modulation. This article
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As the key components of innate immunity, human host defense antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs) play a critical role in warding off invading microbial pathogens. In addition, AMPs can possess other biological functions such as apoptosis, wound healing, and immune modulation. This article provides an overview on the identification, activity, 3D structure, and mechanism of action of human AMPs selected from the antimicrobial peptide database. Over 100 such peptides have been identified from a variety of tissues and epithelial surfaces, including skin, eyes, ears, mouths, gut, immune, nervous and urinary systems. These peptides vary from 10 to 150 amino acids with a net charge between −3 and +20 and a hydrophobic content below 60%. The sequence diversity enables human AMPs to adopt various 3D structures and to attack pathogens by different mechanisms. While α-defensin HD-6 can self-assemble on the bacterial surface into nanonets to entangle bacteria, both HNP-1 and β-defensin hBD-3 are able to block cell wall biosynthesis by binding to lipid II. Lysozyme is well-characterized to cleave bacterial cell wall polysaccharides but can also kill bacteria by a non-catalytic mechanism. The two hydrophobic domains in the long amphipathic α-helix of human cathelicidin LL-37 lays the basis for binding and disrupting the curved anionic bacterial membrane surfaces by forming pores or via the carpet model. Furthermore, dermcidin may serve as ion channel by forming a long helix-bundle structure. In addition, the C-type lectin RegIIIα can initially recognize bacterial peptidoglycans followed by pore formation in the membrane. Finally, histatin 5 and GAPDH(2-32) can enter microbial cells to exert their effects. It appears that granulysin enters cells and kills intracellular pathogens with the aid of pore-forming perforin. This arsenal of human defense proteins not only keeps us healthy but also inspires the development of a new generation of personalized medicine to combat drug-resistant superbugs, fungi, viruses, parasites, or cancer. Alternatively, multiple factors (e.g., albumin, arginine, butyrate, calcium, cyclic AMP, isoleucine, short-chain fatty acids, UV B light, vitamin D, and zinc) are able to induce the expression of antimicrobial peptides, opening new avenues to the development of anti-infectious drugs. Full article

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