Next Issue
Previous Issue

E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Table of Contents

Mar. Drugs, Volume 8, Issue 11 (November 2010), Pages 2733-2848

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-7
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Effect of Elatol, Isolated from Red Seaweed Laurencia dendroidea, on Leishmania amazonensis
Mar. Drugs 2010, 8(11), 2733-2743; doi:10.3390/md8112733
Received: 9 September 2010 / Revised: 14 October 2010 / Accepted: 22 October 2010 / Published: 29 October 2010
Cited by 37 | PDF Full-text (329 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In the present study, we investigated the antileishmanial activity of sesquiterpene elatol, the major constituent of the Brazilian red seaweed Laurencia dendroidea (Hudson) J.V. Lamouroux, against L. amazonensis. Elatol after 72 h of treatment, showed an IC50 of 4.0 µM and 0.45 µM [...] Read more.
In the present study, we investigated the antileishmanial activity of sesquiterpene elatol, the major constituent of the Brazilian red seaweed Laurencia dendroidea (Hudson) J.V. Lamouroux, against L. amazonensis. Elatol after 72 h of treatment, showed an IC50 of 4.0 µM and 0.45 µM for promastigote and intracellular amastigote forms of L. amazonensis, respectively. By scanning and transmission electron microscopy, parasites treated with elatol revealed notable changes compared with control cells, including: pronounced swelling of the mitochondrion; appearance of concentric membrane structures inside the organelle; destabilization of the plasma membrane; and formation of membrane structures, apparently an extension of the endoplasmic reticulum, which is suggestive of an autophagic process. A cytotoxicity assay showed that the action of the isolated compound is more specific for protozoa, and it is not toxic to macrophages. Our studies indicated that elatol is a potent antiproliferative agent against promastigote and intracellular amastigote forms, and may have important advantages for the development of new anti-leishamanial chemotherapies. Full article
Figures

Open AccessArticle Verrucisidinol and Verrucosidinol Acetate, Two Pyrone-Type Polyketides Isolated from a Marine Derived Fungus, Penicillium aurantiogriseum
Mar. Drugs 2010, 8(11), 2744-2754; doi:10.3390/md8112744
Received: 1 October 2010 / Revised: 22 October 2010 / Accepted: 26 October 2010 / Published: 1 November 2010
Cited by 15 | PDF Full-text (216 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The new secondary metabolites verrucosidinol (1) and its derivative verrucosidinol acetate (2), together with a potent neurotoxin verrucosidin (3), a congener norverrucosidin (4) and a mixture of two known phytotoxic metabolites terrestric acids ( [...] Read more.
The new secondary metabolites verrucosidinol (1) and its derivative verrucosidinol acetate (2), together with a potent neurotoxin verrucosidin (3), a congener norverrucosidin (4) and a mixture of two known phytotoxic metabolites terrestric acids (5 and 6), were isolated from the marine derived fungus Penicillium aurantiogriseum. Verrucosidinol has a ring-opened ethylene oxide moiety in the polyene α-pyrone skeleton, and verrucosidinol acetate is its acetate derivative. The chemical structures were determined by comparing with literature data and a combination of spectroscopic techniques, including high resolution mass spectrum and two-dimentional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis. Full article
Figures

Open AccessArticle Antimutagenicity and Antiproliferative Studies of Lipidic Extracts from White Shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei)
Mar. Drugs 2010, 8(11), 2795-2809; doi:10.3390/md8112795
Received: 26 September 2010 / Revised: 14 October 2010 / Accepted: 2 November 2010 / Published: 8 November 2010
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (311 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
An organic extract from fresh shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) was studied for antimutagenic and antiproliferative properties using Salmonella typhimurium tester strains TA98 and TA100 with metabolic activation (S9) and a cancer cell line (B-cell lymphoma), respectively. Shrimp extract was sequentially fractionated [...] Read more.
An organic extract from fresh shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) was studied for antimutagenic and antiproliferative properties using Salmonella typhimurium tester strains TA98 and TA100 with metabolic activation (S9) and a cancer cell line (B-cell lymphoma), respectively. Shrimp extract was sequentially fractionated by thin layer chromatography (TLC) and each fraction was tested for antimutagenic and antiproliferative activities. Crude organic extracts obtained from shrimp reduced the number of revertants caused by aflatoxina B1, showing a dose-response type of relationship. Sequential TLC fractionation of the active extracts produced several antimutagenic and/or antiproliferative fractions. These results suggested that the lipid fraction of the tested species contained compounds with chemoprotective properties that reduce the mutagenicity of AFB1 and proliferation of a cancer cell line. Full article
Open AccessArticle Lobophytones O–T, New Biscembranoids and Cembranoid from Soft Coral Lobophytum pauciflorum
Mar. Drugs 2010, 8(11), 2837-2848; doi:10.3390/md8112848
Received: 1 October 2010 / Revised: 18 October 2010 / Accepted: 4 November 2010 / Published: 10 November 2010
Cited by 15 | PDF Full-text (357 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Chemical examination of a Chinese soft coral Lobophytum pauciflorum resulted in the isolation of five new biscembranoids named lobophytones O–S (15) and a new “monomeric” cembrane lobophytone T (6). The structures of the new compounds were [...] Read more.
Chemical examination of a Chinese soft coral Lobophytum pauciflorum resulted in the isolation of five new biscembranoids named lobophytones O–S (15) and a new “monomeric” cembrane lobophytone T (6). The structures of the new compounds were elucidated by interpretation of 1D and 2D NMR (COSY, HSQC, HMBC, and NOESY) spectroscopic data in association with MS and IR data. Lobophytone Q showed significant inhibition against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) release in mouse peritoneal macrophages, while lobophytones Q and T showed inhibitory activities against the bacteria Saureus and S. pneumoniae. Full article
Figures

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Thiazole and Oxazole Alkaloids: Isolation and Synthesis
Mar. Drugs 2010, 8(11), 2755-2780; doi:10.3390/md8112755
Received: 17 September 2010 / Revised: 27 October 2010 / Accepted: 4 November 2010 / Published: 5 November 2010
Cited by 44 | PDF Full-text (1332 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract Thiazoles, oxazole and their corresponding reduced derivatives, thiazolines and oxazolines, are found in marine sources exhibiting significant biological activities. The isolation, synthetic, and biological studies of these natural products, covering literature from January 2007 to June 2010, are summarized. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Alkaloids)
Open AccessReview Marine Bacterial Sialyltransferases
Mar. Drugs 2010, 8(11), 2781-2794; doi:10.3390/md8112781
Received: 20 September 2010 / Revised: 25 October 2010 / Accepted: 2 November 2010 / Published: 5 November 2010
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (301 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Sialyltransferases transfer N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) from the common donor substrate of these enzymes, cytidine 5’-monophospho-N-acetylneuraminic acid (CMP-Neu5Ac), to acceptor substrates. The enzymatic reaction products including sialyl‑glycoproteins, sialyl-glycolipids and sialyl-oligosaccharides are important molecules in various biological and physiological processes, such [...] Read more.
Sialyltransferases transfer N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) from the common donor substrate of these enzymes, cytidine 5’-monophospho-N-acetylneuraminic acid (CMP-Neu5Ac), to acceptor substrates. The enzymatic reaction products including sialyl‑glycoproteins, sialyl-glycolipids and sialyl-oligosaccharides are important molecules in various biological and physiological processes, such as cell-cell recognition, cancer metastasis, and virus infection. Thus, sialyltransferases are thought to be important enzymes in the field of glycobiology. To date, many sialyltransferases and the genes encoding them have been obtained from various sources including mammalian, bacterial and viral sources. During the course of our research, we have detected over 20 bacteria that produce sialyltransferases. Many of the bacteria we isolated from marine environments are classified in the genus Photobacterium or the closely related genus Vibrio. The paper reviews the sialyltransferases obtained mainly from marine bacteria. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Enzymes from the Sea: Sources, Molecular Biology and Bioprocesses)
Open AccessReview Recent N-Atom Containing Compounds from Indo-Pacific Invertebrates
Mar. Drugs 2010, 8(11), 2810-2836; doi:10.3390/md8112810
Received: 19 September 2010 / Revised: 3 November 2010 / Accepted: 8 November 2010 / Published: 10 November 2010
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (1705 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A large variety of unique N-atom containing compounds (alkaloids) without terrestrial counterparts, have been isolated from marine invertebrates, mainly sponges and ascidians. Many of these compounds display interesting biological activities. In this report we present studies on nitrogenous compounds, isolated by [...] Read more.
A large variety of unique N-atom containing compounds (alkaloids) without terrestrial counterparts, have been isolated from marine invertebrates, mainly sponges and ascidians. Many of these compounds display interesting biological activities. In this report we present studies on nitrogenous compounds, isolated by our group during the last few years, from Indo-Pacific sponges, one ascidian and one gorgonian. The major part of the review deals with metabolites from the Madagascar sponge Fascaplysinopsis sp., namely, four groups of secondary metabolites, the salarins, tulearins, taumycins and tausalarins. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Alkaloids)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Marine Drugs Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
marinedrugs@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Marine Drugs
Back to Top