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Forests, Volume 8, Issue 5 (May 2017)

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Cover Story (view full-size image) We test whether low-cost drones can accurately estimate height and biomass in monoculture [...] Read more.
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Branch Wood Decomposition of Tree Species in a Deciduous Temperate Forest in Korea
Forests 2017, 8(5), 176; https://doi.org/10.3390/f8050176
Received: 11 April 2017 / Revised: 11 May 2017 / Accepted: 12 May 2017 / Published: 19 May 2017
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Abstract
Woody debris, which is supplied by branch litter, is an important component of forest ecosystems as it contains large quantities of organic matter and nutrients. We evaluated changes in branch wood dry weight and nutrient content of six common species (Fraxinus rhynchophylla
[...] Read more.
Woody debris, which is supplied by branch litter, is an important component of forest ecosystems as it contains large quantities of organic matter and nutrients. We evaluated changes in branch wood dry weight and nutrient content of six common species (Fraxinus rhynchophylla, Pinus densiflora, Prunus sargentii, Quercus mongolica, Acer pseudosieboldianum, and Symplocos chinensis for. pilosa) in a deciduous temperate forest in Korea for 40 months. Branch wood disk samples 1.4–1.6 cm thick were cut, and mass loss was measured over time using the litterbag method. No significant differences in mass loss were recorded among the six tree species. Further, mass loss was negatively correlated with initial lignin concentration and positively correlated with both initial cellulose concentration and wood density for each species. Species with high wood cellulose content had high wood density while the lignin content in wood was relatively low. Accordingly, cellulose contributed to wood density, creating a relatively lower lignin content, and the decreased lignin concentration increased the wood decomposition rate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coarse Woody Debris of Forests in a Changing World)
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Open AccessArticle Drought Influence over Radial Growth of Mexican Conifers Inhabiting Mesic and Xeric Sites
Forests 2017, 8(5), 175; https://doi.org/10.3390/f8050175
Received: 23 April 2017 / Revised: 11 May 2017 / Accepted: 16 May 2017 / Published: 19 May 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1799 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Drought is a major constraint of forest productivity and tree growth across diverse habitat types. In this study, we investigated the drought responses of four conifer species growing within two locations of differing elevation and climatic conditions in northern Mexico. Two species were
[...] Read more.
Drought is a major constraint of forest productivity and tree growth across diverse habitat types. In this study, we investigated the drought responses of four conifer species growing within two locations of differing elevation and climatic conditions in northern Mexico. Two species were selected at a mesic site (Cupressus lusitanica Mill., Abies durangensis Martínez) and the other two species were sampled at a xeric site (Pinus engelmannii Carr., Pinus cembroides Zucc.). Using a dendrochronological approach, we correlated the radial-growth series of each species and the climatic variables. All study species positively responded to wet-cool conditions during winter and spring. Despite the close proximity of species at a mesic site, A. durangensis had high responsiveness to hydroclimatic variability, but C. lusitanica was not responsive. At the xeric site, P. engelmannii and P. cembroides were very responsive to drought severity, differentiated only by the longer time scale of the response to accumulated drought of P. engelmannii. The responsiveness to hydroclimate and drought of these tree species seems to be modulated by site conditions, or by the functional features of each species that are still little explored. These findings indicate that differentiating between mesic and xeric habitats is a too coarse approach in diverse forests with a high topographic heterogeneity. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview Responses of Ground-Dwelling Invertebrates to Gap Formation and Accumulation of Woody Debris from Invasive Species, Wind, and Salvage LoggingRunning Title: Perry and Herms: Responses of Ground-Dwelling Invertebrates
Forests 2017, 8(5), 174; https://doi.org/10.3390/f8050174
Received: 12 April 2017 / Revised: 12 May 2017 / Accepted: 13 May 2017 / Published: 18 May 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1123 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Natural and anthropogenic disturbances alter canopy structure, understory vegetation, amount of woody debris, and the litter and soil layers in forest ecosystems. These environmental changes impact forest communities, including ground-dwelling invertebrates that are key regulators of ecosystem processes. Variation in frequency, intensity, duration,
[...] Read more.
Natural and anthropogenic disturbances alter canopy structure, understory vegetation, amount of woody debris, and the litter and soil layers in forest ecosystems. These environmental changes impact forest communities, including ground-dwelling invertebrates that are key regulators of ecosystem processes. Variation in frequency, intensity, duration, and spatial scale of disturbances affect the magnitude of these environmental changes and how forest communities and ecosystems are impacted over time. We propose conceptual models that describe the dynamic temporal effects of disturbance caused by invasive insects, wind, and salvage logging on canopy gap formation and accumulation of coarse woody debris (CWD), and their impacts on ground-dwelling invertebrate communities. In the context of this framework, predictions are generated and their implications for ground-dwelling invertebrate communities are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coarse Woody Debris of Forests in a Changing World)
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Open AccessArticle Earlywood and Latewood Widths of Picea chihuahuana Show Contrasting Sensitivity to Seasonal Climate
Forests 2017, 8(5), 173; https://doi.org/10.3390/f8050173
Received: 28 March 2017 / Revised: 15 May 2017 / Accepted: 16 May 2017 / Published: 18 May 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1623 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The existence of endangered tree species in Mexico necessitates an understanding of their vulnerability to the predicted climate changes (warming and drying trends). In this study, the sensitivity to climate of earlywood (EW) and latewood (LW) widths of the
[...] Read more.
The existence of endangered tree species in Mexico necessitates an understanding of their vulnerability to the predicted climate changes (warming and drying trends). In this study, the sensitivity to climate of earlywood (EW) and latewood (LW) widths of the threatened Picea chihuahuana was determined. The response of EW and LW to climate variables (maximum temperature, minimum temperature, precipitation, evaporation, and a drought index) was analyzed by means of correlation analysis using dendrochronology over the period of 1950–2015. EW and LW production were enhanced by cool and wet conditions during winter prior to the start of growing season. During the growing season, EW and LW production increased in response to cool spring and summer conditions, respectively; temperatures and year-round evaporation, excluding summer and the previous drought in the period prior to the growing season. EW was sensitive to seasonal drought, which is a concern considering the predicted aridification trends for the study area. These results provide further knowledge on the dendroecological potential of Picea chihuahuana. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Optimizing the Wood Value Chain in Northern Norway Taking Into Account National and Regional Economic Trade-Offs
Forests 2017, 8(5), 172; https://doi.org/10.3390/f8050172
Received: 10 March 2017 / Revised: 27 April 2017 / Accepted: 9 May 2017 / Published: 17 May 2017
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Abstract
As a consequence of past decades of extensive afforestation in Norway, mature forest volumes are increasing. National forestry politics call for sustainable and efficient resource usage and for increased regional processing. Regional policies seek to provide good conditions for such industries to be
[...] Read more.
As a consequence of past decades of extensive afforestation in Norway, mature forest volumes are increasing. National forestry politics call for sustainable and efficient resource usage and for increased regional processing. Regional policies seek to provide good conditions for such industries to be competitive and to improve regional value creation. We demonstrate how methods from operations research and regional macro-economics may complement each other to support decision makers in this process. The operations research perspective is concerned with finding an optimally designed wood value chain and an aggregated planning of its operations, taking a holistic perspective on strategic-tactical level. Using Input-Output analysis methods based on statistics and survey data, regional macro-economics helps to estimate each industry actor’s value creation and impact on society beyond immediate value chain activities. Combining these approaches in a common mathematical optimization model, a balance can be struck between industry/business and regional political interests. For a realistic case study from the northern part of coastal Norway, we explore this balance from several perspectives, investigating value chain profits, economic ripple effects and regional resource usage. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Performance of a Mobile Star Screen to Improve Woodchip Quality of Forest Residues
Forests 2017, 8(5), 171; https://doi.org/10.3390/f8050171
Received: 4 April 2017 / Revised: 2 May 2017 / Accepted: 13 May 2017 / Published: 17 May 2017
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Abstract
Low harvesting costs and increasing demand for forest-derived biomass led to an increased use of full-tree (FT) harvesting in steep terrain areas in Austria. Logging residues, as a by-product of FT harvesting, present an easily accessible bioenergy resource, but high portions of fine
[...] Read more.
Low harvesting costs and increasing demand for forest-derived biomass led to an increased use of full-tree (FT) harvesting in steep terrain areas in Austria. Logging residues, as a by-product of FT harvesting, present an easily accessible bioenergy resource, but high portions of fine particles and contaminants like earth particles and stones make them a complex and difficult fuel, as they affect storage capability, conversion efficiency, or emission rates adversely. The present research focuses on the productivity and performance of a star screen, which was used to remove fine and oversize particles from previously chipped, fresh Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) logging residue woodchips. Three screen settings, which differed in terms of different rotation speeds of the fine star elements (1861 rpm, 2239 rpm, 2624 rpm) were analyzed. Time studies of the star screen were carried out to estimate screening productivity and costs. Furthermore, 115 samples were collected from all material streams, which were assessed for particle size distribution, calorific value, ash content, and component and elemental composition. Average productivity was 20.6 tonnes (t) per productive system hour (PSH15), corresponding to screening costs of 9.02 €/t. The results indicated that the screening of chipped logging residues with a star screen influenced material characteristics of the medium fraction, as it decreased the ash content, the incidence of fine particles, and the nutrient content. The different screen settings had a noticeable influence on the quality characteristics of the screening products. An increase of the rotation speed of the fine stars reduced screening costs per unit of screened material in the medium fraction, but also lowered screening quality. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Reducing Reforestation Costs in Lebanon: Adaptive Field Trials
Forests 2017, 8(5), 169; https://doi.org/10.3390/f8050169
Received: 3 February 2017 / Revised: 20 April 2017 / Accepted: 6 May 2017 / Published: 17 May 2017
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Abstract
Lebanon’s Ministry of Environment initiated a project in 2009 to determine low-cost reforestation techniques for stone pine (Pinus pinea) and Lebanon cedar (Cedrus libani) for large-scale land rehabilitation activities in the arid Middle East. Irrigation (several techniques vs. no
[...] Read more.
Lebanon’s Ministry of Environment initiated a project in 2009 to determine low-cost reforestation techniques for stone pine (Pinus pinea) and Lebanon cedar (Cedrus libani) for large-scale land rehabilitation activities in the arid Middle East. Irrigation (several techniques vs. no water), planting (8- to 18-month-old seedlings), seeding, and soil preparation methods were evaluated in three sets of adaptive management field trials. The aim was to reduce reforestation costs while still achieving sufficient regeneration. A key result for management was that non-irrigated seed planting of stone pine and possibly of Lebanon cedar showed promise for cost-effective reforestation and could be competitive with seedlings, given correct seed source and planting conditions. Stone pine seeds collected from nearby mother trees and planted without irrigation on sandy soil showed 35% survival for <600 USD/ha; seedlings planted without irrigation cost about 2500 USD/ha and achieved 50–70% survival (costs based on 800 seedlings/ha). Water supplements increased establishment costs over 2 years without concomitant improvements to survival. Future studies should evaluate how soil texture and soil preparation interact with other factors to affect seed germination and survival for each species. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Comparing Empirical and Semi-Empirical Approaches to Forest Biomass Modelling in Different Biomes Using Airborne Laser Scanner Data
Forests 2017, 8(5), 170; https://doi.org/10.3390/f8050170
Received: 10 March 2017 / Revised: 7 May 2017 / Accepted: 12 May 2017 / Published: 16 May 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1674 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Airborne laser scanner (ALS) data are used operationally to support field inventories and enhance the accuracy of forest biomass estimates. Modelling the relationship between ALS and field data is a fundamental step of such applications and the quality of the model is essential
[...] Read more.
Airborne laser scanner (ALS) data are used operationally to support field inventories and enhance the accuracy of forest biomass estimates. Modelling the relationship between ALS and field data is a fundamental step of such applications and the quality of the model is essential for the final accuracy of the estimates. Different modelling approaches and variable transformations have been advocated in the existing literature, but comparisons are few or non-existent. In the present study, two main approaches to modelling were compared: the empirical and semi-empirical approaches. Evaluation of model performance was conducted using a conventional evaluation criterion, i.e., the mean square deviation (MSD). In addition, a novel evaluation criterion, the model error (ME), was proposed. The ME was constructed by combining a MSD expression and a model-based variance estimate. For the empirical approach, multiple regression models were developed with two alternative transformation strategies: square root transformation of the response, and natural logarithmic transformation of both response and predictors. For the semi-empirical approach, a nonlinear regression of a power model form was chosen. Two alternative predictor variables, mean canopy height and top canopy height, were used separately. Results showed that the semi-empirical approach resulted in the smallest MSD in three of five study sites. The empirical approach resulted in smaller ME in the temperate and boreal biomes, while the semi-empirical approach resulted in smaller ME in the tropical biomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optimizing Forest Inventories with Remote Sensing Techniques)
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Open AccessArticle Drones as a Tool for Monoculture Plantation Assessment in the Steepland Tropics
Forests 2017, 8(5), 168; https://doi.org/10.3390/f8050168
Received: 31 March 2017 / Revised: 2 May 2017 / Accepted: 6 May 2017 / Published: 12 May 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (2456 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Smallholder tree plantations are expanding in the steepland tropics due to demand for timber and interest in ecosystem services, such as carbon storage. Financial mechanisms are developing to compensate vegetation carbon stores. However, measuring biomass—necessary for accessing carbon funds—at small scales is costly
[...] Read more.
Smallholder tree plantations are expanding in the steepland tropics due to demand for timber and interest in ecosystem services, such as carbon storage. Financial mechanisms are developing to compensate vegetation carbon stores. However, measuring biomass—necessary for accessing carbon funds—at small scales is costly and time-intensive. Therefore, we test whether low-cost drones can accurately estimate height and biomass in monoculture plantations in the tropics. We used Ecosynth, a drone-based structure from motion technique, to build 3D vegetation models from drone photographs. These data were filtered to create a digital terrain model (DTM) and digital surface model (DSM). Two different canopy height models (CHMs) from the Ecosynth DSM were obtained by subtracting terrain elevations from the Ecosynth DTM and a LIDAR DTM. We compared height and biomass derived from these CHMs to field data. Both CHMs accurately predicted the height of all species combined; however, the CHM from the LiDAR DTM predicted heights and biomass on a per-species basis more accurately. Height and biomass estimates were strong for evergreen single-stemmed trees, and unreliable for small leaf-off species during the dry season. This study demonstrates that drones can estimate plantation biomass for select species when used with an accurate DTM. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optimizing Forest Inventories with Remote Sensing Techniques)
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Open AccessArticle Thinning of Beech Forests Stocking on Shallow Calcareous Soil Maintains Soil C and N Stocks in the Long Run
Forests 2017, 8(5), 167; https://doi.org/10.3390/f8050167
Received: 1 February 2017 / Revised: 7 May 2017 / Accepted: 8 May 2017 / Published: 11 May 2017
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Abstract
Sustainable forest management should avoid disturbance and volatilization of the soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) stocks both under present and projected future climate. Earlier studies have shown that thinning of European beech forests induces a strong initial perturbation of the soil C
[...] Read more.
Sustainable forest management should avoid disturbance and volatilization of the soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) stocks both under present and projected future climate. Earlier studies have shown that thinning of European beech forests induces a strong initial perturbation of the soil C and N cycles in shallow Rendzic Leptosol, which consists of lower soil N retention and strongly enhanced gaseous losses observed over several years. Persistence of these effects could decrease soil organic matter (SOM) levels and associated soil functions such as erosion protection, nutrient retention, and fertility. Therefore, we resampled untreated control and thinned stands a decade after thinning at sites representing both typical present day and projected future climatic conditions for European beech forests. We determined soil organic C and total N stocks, as well as δ13C and δ15N as integrators of changes in soil C and N cycles. Thinning did not alter these parameters at any of the sampled sites, indicating that initial effects on soil C and N cycles constitute short-term perturbations. Consequently, thinning may be considered a sustainable beech forest management strategy with regard to the maintenance of soil organic C and total N stocks both under present and future climate. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Patch-Based Forest Change Detection from Landsat Time Series
Forests 2017, 8(5), 166; https://doi.org/10.3390/f8050166
Received: 20 February 2017 / Revised: 28 April 2017 / Accepted: 5 May 2017 / Published: 11 May 2017
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (6489 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
In the species-rich and structurally complex forests of the Eastern United States, disturbance events are often partial and therefore difficult to detect using remote sensing methods. Here we present a set of new algorithms, collectively called Vegetation Regeneration and Disturbance Estimates through Time
[...] Read more.
In the species-rich and structurally complex forests of the Eastern United States, disturbance events are often partial and therefore difficult to detect using remote sensing methods. Here we present a set of new algorithms, collectively called Vegetation Regeneration and Disturbance Estimates through Time (VeRDET), which employ a novel patch-based approach to detect periods of vegetation disturbance, stability, and growth from the historical Landsat image records. VeRDET generates a yearly clear-sky composite from satellite imagery, calculates a spectral vegetation index for each pixel in that composite, spatially segments the vegetation index image into patches, temporally divides the time series into differently sloped segments, and then labels those segments as disturbed, stable, or regenerating. Segmentation at both the spatial and temporal steps are performed using total variation regularization, an algorithm originally designed for signal denoising. This study explores VeRDET’s effectiveness in detecting forest change using four vegetation indices and two parameters controlling the spatial and temporal scales of segmentation within a calibration region. We then evaluate algorithm effectiveness within a 386,000 km2 area in the Eastern United States where VeRDET has overall error of 23% and omission error across disturbances ranging from 22% to 78% depending on agent. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing of Forest Disturbance)
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Open AccessArticle An Evaluation of Stakeholder Perception Differences in Forest Road Assessment Factors Using the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP)
Forests 2017, 8(5), 165; https://doi.org/10.3390/f8050165
Received: 7 March 2017 / Revised: 7 May 2017 / Accepted: 9 May 2017 / Published: 11 May 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (657 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Many factors, with differing priority ratios, need to be assessed in the evaluation of forest roads. Stakeholder perceptions differ in the road assessment process and this research addresses those differences between academic and practitioner groups. The focus was on four main forest road
[...] Read more.
Many factors, with differing priority ratios, need to be assessed in the evaluation of forest roads. Stakeholder perceptions differ in the road assessment process and this research addresses those differences between academic and practitioner groups. The focus was on four main forest road assessment factor groups (technical, economic, environmental, and social) within 23 sub-factors to determine the priority ratios using the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) method. Stakeholder groups expressed different priority ratios, indicating varying perceptions of the importance of these factors: forest engineering academic staff identified technical specifications as the most important issue (with a ratio of 39.77%), while environmental issues were most important for forestry department academic staff, mechanical supply technical staff, and forest enterprise chiefs (with ratios of 41.79%, 39.95%, and 37.03%, respectively). Due to differences in stakeholder group perceptions, a participatory forest road assessment approach should be adopted. Full article
Open AccessArticle Influence of Cutting Type and Fertilization in Production of Containerized Poplar Plants
Forests 2017, 8(5), 164; https://doi.org/10.3390/f8050164
Received: 1 March 2017 / Revised: 25 April 2017 / Accepted: 8 May 2017 / Published: 11 May 2017
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Abstract
Most poplar plantations are planted on marginal agricultural land, but poplar plantations also hold the potential for increased profits compared to plantations of other species on non-agricultural, previously forested land. To date, the establishment of poplar plantations on previously forested land is limited
[...] Read more.
Most poplar plantations are planted on marginal agricultural land, but poplar plantations also hold the potential for increased profits compared to plantations of other species on non-agricultural, previously forested land. To date, the establishment of poplar plantations on previously forested land is limited by the production of suitable containerized poplar stock for planting. The objective of this study is to investigate how different cutting quality and fertilizer treatments influence height, diameter, and root biomass growth and root-to-shoot ratio, all important variables for plant establishment. Our results show that fertilization increases plant growth and that single-bud and two-bud cuttings with cutting diameters of 5 to 10 mm can be used in the production of containerized plants. Root biomass was similar between these plant types but the number of roots per plant was higher if two-bud cuttings were used. In contrast to fertilized plants, only one cutting type (two-bud 10 mm) grew to a sufficient height and diameter for use in poplar plantation establishment. Interestingly, the root-to-shoot ratio for this cutting type was 0.16 while the ratio for the same cutting type is 0.11 if fertilized. Together, these results suggest that most types of poplar cuttings can be used to establish poplar plantations if fertilizer is used and that the largest cutting type (two-bud 10 mm) might be more suitable to establish poplar plantations at harsh sites, thus reducing the cost of poplar plant production. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Introducing a Non-Stationary Matrix Model for Stand-Level Optimization, an Even-Aged Pine (Pinus Sylvestris L.) Stand in Finland
Forests 2017, 8(5), 163; https://doi.org/10.3390/f8050163
Received: 10 April 2017 / Revised: 5 May 2017 / Accepted: 9 May 2017 / Published: 11 May 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (354 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In general, matrix models are commonly applied to predict tree growth for size-structured tree populations, whereas empirical–statistical models are designed to predict tree growth based on a vast amount of field observations. From the theoretical point of view, matrix models can be considered
[...] Read more.
In general, matrix models are commonly applied to predict tree growth for size-structured tree populations, whereas empirical–statistical models are designed to predict tree growth based on a vast amount of field observations. From the theoretical point of view, matrix models can be considered to be more generic since their dependency on ad hoc growth conditions is far less prevalent than that of empirical–statistical models. On the other hand, the main pitfall of matrix models is their inability to include variation among the individuals within a size class, occasionally resulting in less accurate predictions of tree growth compared to empirical–statistical models. Thus, the relevant question is whether a matrix model can capture essential tree-growth dynamics/characteristics so that the model produces accurate stand projections which can further be applied in practical decision-making. Such a dynamic characteristic in our model is the basal area of trees, which causes nonlinearity in time. Therefore, our matrix model is a nonlinear model. The empirical data for models was based on 20 sample plots representing 8360 tree records. Further, according to the model, stand projections were produced for three Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) sapling stands (age of 25 years, stand density fluctuating from 850 to 1400 stems ha - 1 ). Then, (even-aged) stand management was optimized by applying sequential quadratic programming (SQP) among those growth predictions. The objective function of the optimization task was to maximize the net present value (NPV) of the ongoing rotation. The stands were located in Northern Ostrobothnia, Finland, on nutrient-poor soil type. The results indicated that initial stand density had an effect on optimal solutions—optimal stand management varied with respect to thinnings (timing and intensity) as well as to optimal rotation. Further, an increasing discount rate shortened considerably the optimal rotation period, and relaxing the minimum thinning removal to 30 m 3 ha - 1 resulted in an increase both in number of thinnings and in the maximum net present value. Full article
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Open AccessArticle A Mixed Application of Geographically Weighted Regression and Unsupervised Classification for Analyzing Latex Yield Variability in Yunnan, China
Forests 2017, 8(5), 162; https://doi.org/10.3390/f8050162
Received: 8 February 2017 / Revised: 18 April 2017 / Accepted: 26 April 2017 / Published: 11 May 2017
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Abstract
This paper introduces a mixed method approach for analyzing the determinants of natural latex yields and the associated spatial variations and identifying the most suitable regions for producing latex. Geographically Weighted Regressions (GWR) and Iterative Self-Organizing Data Analysis Technique (ISODATA) are jointly applied
[...] Read more.
This paper introduces a mixed method approach for analyzing the determinants of natural latex yields and the associated spatial variations and identifying the most suitable regions for producing latex. Geographically Weighted Regressions (GWR) and Iterative Self-Organizing Data Analysis Technique (ISODATA) are jointly applied to the georeferenced data points collected from the rubber plantations in Xishuangbanna (in Yunnan province, south China) and other remotely-sensed spatial data. According to the GWR models, Age of rubber tree, Percent of clay in soil, Elevation, Solar radiation, Population, Distance from road, Distance from stream, Precipitation, and Mean temperature turn out statistically significant, indicating that these are the major determinants shaping latex yields at the prefecture level. However, the signs and magnitudes of the parameter estimates at the aggregate level are different from those at the lower spatial level, and the differences are due to diverse reasons. The ISODATA classifies the landscape into three categories: high, medium, and low potential yields. The map reveals that Mengla County has the majority of land with high potential yield, while Jinghong City and Menghai County show lower potential yield. In short, the mixed method can offer a means of providing greater insights in the prediction of agricultural production. Full article
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