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Viruses, Volume 4, Issue 4 (April 2012), Pages 424-653

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Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Structural Basis for Differential Neutralization of Ebolaviruses
Viruses 2012, 4(4), 447-470; doi:10.3390/v4040447
Received: 1 March 2012 / Revised: 26 March 2012 / Accepted: 27 March 2012 / Published: 5 April 2012
Cited by 26 | PDF Full-text (2291 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
There are five antigenically distinct ebolaviruses that cause hemorrhagic fever in humans or non-human primates (Ebola virus, Sudan virus, Reston virus, Taï Forest virus, and Bundibugyo virus). The small handful of antibodies known to neutralize the ebolaviruses bind to the surface glycoprotein [...] Read more.
There are five antigenically distinct ebolaviruses that cause hemorrhagic fever in humans or non-human primates (Ebola virus, Sudan virus, Reston virus, Taï Forest virus, and Bundibugyo virus). The small handful of antibodies known to neutralize the ebolaviruses bind to the surface glycoprotein termed GP1,2. Curiously, some antibodies against them are known to neutralize in vitro but not protect in vivo, whereas other antibodies are known to protect animal models in vivo, but not neutralize in vitro. A detailed understanding of what constitutes a neutralizing and/or protective antibody response is critical for development of novel therapeutic strategies. Here, we show that paradoxically, a lower affinity antibody with restricted access to its epitope confers better neutralization than a higher affinity antibody against a similar epitope, suggesting that either subtle differences in epitope, or different characteristics of the GP1,2 molecules themselves, confer differential neutralization susceptibility. Here, we also report the crystal structure of trimeric, prefusion GP1,2 from the original 1976 Boniface variant of Sudan virus complexed with 16F6, the first antibody known to neutralize Sudan virus, and compare the structure to that of Sudan virus, variant Gulu. We discuss new structural details of the GP1-GP2 clamp, thermal motion of various regions in GP1,2 across the two viruses visualized, details of differential interaction of the crystallized neutralizing antibodies, and their relevance for virus neutralization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Filovirus Research 2012) Print Edition available
Open AccessArticle Bacteriophages with the Ability to Degrade Uropathogenic Escherichia Coli Biofilms
Viruses 2012, 4(4), 471-487; doi:10.3390/v4040471
Received: 16 February 2012 / Revised: 20 March 2012 / Accepted: 23 March 2012 / Published: 10 April 2012
Cited by 23 | PDF Full-text (1128 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Escherichia coli-associated urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common bacterial infections in humans. UTIs are usually managed with antibiotic therapy, but over the years, antibiotic-resistant strains of uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) have emerged. The formation of biofilms further complicates [...] Read more.
Escherichia coli-associated urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common bacterial infections in humans. UTIs are usually managed with antibiotic therapy, but over the years, antibiotic-resistant strains of uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) have emerged. The formation of biofilms further complicates the treatment of these infections by making them resistant to killing by the host immune system as well as by antibiotics. This has encouraged research into therapy using bacteriophages (phages) as a supplement or substitute for antibiotics. In this study we characterized 253 UPEC in terms of their biofilm-forming capabilities, serotype, and antimicrobial resistance. Three phages were then isolated (vB_EcoP_ACG-C91, vB_EcoM_ACG-C40 and vB_EcoS_ACG-M12) which were able to lyse 80.5% of a subset (42) of the UPEC strains able to form biofilms. Correlation was established between phage sensitivity and specific serotypes of the UPEC strains. The phages’ genome sequences were determined and resulted in classification of vB_EcoP_ACG-C91 as a SP6likevirus, vB_EcoM_ACG-C40 as a T4likevirus and vB_EcoS_ACG-M12 as T1likevirus. We assessed the ability of the three phages to eradicate the established biofilm of one of the UPEC strains used in the study. All phages significantly reduced the biofilm within 2–12 h of incubation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Progress in Bacteriophage Research) Print Edition available
Open AccessArticle Daphne Genkwa Sieb. et Zucc. Water-Soluble Extracts Act on Enterovirus 71 by Inhibiting Viral Entry
Viruses 2012, 4(4), 539-556; doi:10.3390/v4040539
Received: 7 March 2012 / Revised: 26 March 2012 / Accepted: 3 April 2012 / Published: 11 April 2012
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (4376 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Dried flowers of Daphne genkwa Sieb. et Zucc. (Thymelaeaceae) are a Chinese herbal medicine used as an abortifacient with purgative, diuretic and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the activity of this medicine against enteroviral infections has not been investigated. The water-extract of dried buds [...] Read more.
Dried flowers of Daphne genkwa Sieb. et Zucc. (Thymelaeaceae) are a Chinese herbal medicine used as an abortifacient with purgative, diuretic and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the activity of this medicine against enteroviral infections has not been investigated. The water-extract of dried buds of D. genkwa Sieb. et Zucc. (DGFW) was examined against various strains of enterovirus 71 (EV71) by neutralization assay, and its initial mode of action was characterized by time-of-addition assay followed by attachment and penetration assays. Pretreatment of DGFW with virus abolished viral replication, indicating that DGFW inhibits EV71 by targeting the virus. GFW exerts its anti-EV71 effects by inhibiting viral entry without producing cytotoxic side effects and thus provides a potential agent for antiviral chemotherapeutics. Full article
Open AccessArticle RNA-Sequencing Analysis of 5' Capped RNAs Identifies Many New Differentially Expressed Genes in Acute Hepatitis C Virus Infection
Viruses 2012, 4(4), 581-612; doi:10.3390/v4040581
Received: 7 February 2012 / Revised: 31 March 2012 / Accepted: 3 April 2012 / Published: 16 April 2012
Cited by 13 | PDF Full-text (1896 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
We describe the first report of RNA sequencing of 5' capped (Pol II) RNAs isolated from acutely hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected Huh 7.5 cells that provides a general approach to identifying differentially expressed annotated and unannotated genes that participate in viral-host interactions. We identified 100, 684, and 1,844 significantly differentially expressed annotated genes in acutely infected proliferative Huh 7.5 cells at 6, 48, and 72 hours, respectively (fold change ≥ 1.5 and Bonferroni adjusted p-values < 0.05). Most of the differentially expressed genes (>80%) and biological pathways (such as adipocytokine, Notch, Hedgehog and NOD-like receptor signaling) were not identified by previous gene array studies. These genes are critical components of host immune, inflammatory and oncogenic pathways and provide new information regarding changes that may benefit the virus or mediate HCV induced pathology. RNAi knockdown studies of newly identified highly upregulated FUT1 and KLHDC7B genes provide evidence that their gene products regulate and facilitate HCV replication in hepatocytes. Our approach also identified novel Pol II unannotated transcripts that were upregulated. Results further identify new pathways that regulate HCV replication in hepatocytes and suggest that our approach will have general applications in studying viral-host interactions in model systems and clinical biospecimens. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hepatitis C Pathology)
Open AccessArticle Co-circulation of Four Human Coronaviruses (HCoVs) in Queensland Children with Acute Respiratory Tract Illnesses in 2004
Viruses 2012, 4(4), 637-653; doi:10.3390/v4040637
Received: 23 March 2012 / Revised: 11 April 2012 / Accepted: 11 April 2012 / Published: 23 April 2012
Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (441 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Acute respiratory illnesses (ARIs) with unconfirmed infectious aetiologies peak at different times of the year. Molecular diagnostic assays reduce the number of unconfirmed ARIs compared to serology- or culture-based techniques. Screening of 888 inpatient and outpatient respiratory specimens spanning late autumn through [...] Read more.
Acute respiratory illnesses (ARIs) with unconfirmed infectious aetiologies peak at different times of the year. Molecular diagnostic assays reduce the number of unconfirmed ARIs compared to serology- or culture-based techniques. Screening of 888 inpatient and outpatient respiratory specimens spanning late autumn through to early spring, 2004, identified the presence of a human coronavirus (HCoV) on 74 occasions (8.3% of all specimens and 26.3% of all respiratory virus detections). Prevalence peaked in August (late winter in the southern hemisphere) when they were detected in 21.9% of specimens tested. HCoV-HKU1 and HCoV-OC43 comprised 82.4% of all HCoVs detected. Positive specimens were used to develop novel reverse transcriptase real-time PCRs (RT-rtPCRs) for HCoV detection. An objective clinical severity score was assigned to each positive HCoV patient. Severity scores were similar to those from a random selection of young children who were positive for respiratory syncytial virus at a different time but from the same specimen population. During the cooler months of 2004, sensitive and specific RT-rtPCRs identified the concurrent circulation of all four HCoVs, a quarter of which co-occurred with another virus and most of which were from children under the age of two years. Full article

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Interplay between Interferon-Mediated Innate Immunity and Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus
Viruses 2012, 4(4), 424-446; doi:10.3390/v4040424
Received: 30 January 2012 / Revised: 15 March 2012 / Accepted: 18 March 2012 / Published: 2 April 2012
Cited by 50 | PDF Full-text (2045 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Innate immunity is the first line of defense against viral infection, and in turn, viruses have evolved to evade host immune surveillance. As a result, viruses may persist in host and develop chronic infections. Type I interferons (IFN-α/β) are among the most [...] Read more.
Innate immunity is the first line of defense against viral infection, and in turn, viruses have evolved to evade host immune surveillance. As a result, viruses may persist in host and develop chronic infections. Type I interferons (IFN-α/β) are among the most potent antiviral cytokines triggered by viral infections. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is a disease of pigs that is characterized by negligible induction of type I IFNs and viral persistence for an extended period. For IFN production, RIG-I/MDA5 and JAK-STAT pathways are two major signaling pathways, and recent studies indicate that PRRS virus is armed to modulate type I IFN responses during infection. This review describes the viral strategies for modulation of type I IFN responses. At least three non‑structural proteins (Nsp1, Nsp2, and Nsp11) and a structural protein (N nucleocapsid protein) have been identified and characterized to play roles in the IFN suppression and NF-κB pathways. Nsp’s are early proteins while N is a late protein, suggesting that additional signaling pathways may be involved in addition to the IFN pathway. The understanding of molecular bases for virus-mediated modulation of host innate immune signaling will help us design new generation vaccines and control PRRS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Animal Arteriviruses and Coronaviruses)
Figures

Open AccessReview Nanotechnology and the Treatment of HIV Infection
Viruses 2012, 4(4), 488-520; doi:10.3390/v4040488
Received: 23 February 2012 / Revised: 15 March 2012 / Accepted: 27 March 2012 / Published: 10 April 2012
Cited by 25 | PDF Full-text (503 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Suboptimal adherence, toxicity, drug resistance and viral reservoirs make the lifelong treatment of HIV infection challenging. The emerging field of nanotechnology may play an important role in addressing these challenges by creating drugs that possess pharmacological advantages arising out of unique phenomena [...] Read more.
Suboptimal adherence, toxicity, drug resistance and viral reservoirs make the lifelong treatment of HIV infection challenging. The emerging field of nanotechnology may play an important role in addressing these challenges by creating drugs that possess pharmacological advantages arising out of unique phenomena that occur at the “nano” scale. At these dimensions, particles have physicochemical properties that are distinct from those of bulk materials or single molecules or atoms. In this review, basic concepts and terms in nanotechnology are defined, and examples are provided of how nanopharmaceuticals such as nanocrystals, nanocapsules, nanoparticles, solid lipid nanoparticles, nanocarriers, micelles, liposomes and dendrimers have been investigated as potential anti-HIV therapies. Such drugs may, for example, be used to optimize the pharmacological characteristics of known antiretrovirals, deliver anti-HIV nucleic acids into infected cells or achieve targeted delivery of antivirals to the immune system, brain or latent reservoirs. Also, nanopharmaceuticals themselves may possess anti-HIV activity. However several hurdles remain, including toxicity, unwanted biological interactions and the difficulty and cost of large-scale synthesis of nanopharmaceuticals. Full article
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Open AccessReview Megalocytiviruses
Viruses 2012, 4(4), 521-538; doi:10.3390/v4040521
Received: 9 February 2012 / Revised: 14 March 2012 / Accepted: 15 March 2012 / Published: 10 April 2012
Cited by 43 | PDF Full-text (1521 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The genus Megalocytivirus, represented by red sea bream iridovirus (RSIV), the first identified and one of the best characterized megalocytiviruses, Infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus (ISKNV), the type species of the genus, and numerous other isolates, is the newest genus [...] Read more.
The genus Megalocytivirus, represented by red sea bream iridovirus (RSIV), the first identified and one of the best characterized megalocytiviruses, Infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus (ISKNV), the type species of the genus, and numerous other isolates, is the newest genus within the family Iridoviridae. Viruses within this genus are causative agents of severe disease accompanied by high mortality in multiple species of marine and freshwater fish. To date outbreaks of megalocytivirus-induced disease have occurred primarily in south-east Asia and Japan, but infections have been detected in Australia and North America following the importation of infected ornamental fish. The first outbreak of megalocytiviral disease was recorded in cultured red sea bream (Pagrus major) in Japan in 1990 and was designated red sea bream iridovirus disease (RSIVD). Following infection fish became lethargic and exhibited severe anemia, petechiae of the gills, and enlargement of the spleen. Although RSIV was identified as an iridovirus, sequence analyses of RSIV genes revealed that the virus did not belong to any of the four known genera within the family Iridoviridae. Thus a new, fifth genus was established and designated Megalocytivirus to reflect the characteristic presence of enlarged basophilic cells within infected organs. Indirect immunofluorescence tests employing recently generated monoclonal antibodies and PCR assays are currently used in the rapid diagnosis of RSIVD. For disease control, a formalin-killed vaccine was developed and is now commercially available in Japan for several fish species. Following the identification of RSIV, markedly similar viruses such as infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus (ISKNV), dwarf gourami iridovirus (DGIV), turbot reddish body iridovirus (TRBIV), Taiwan grouper iridovirus (TGIV), and rock bream iridovirus (RBIV) were isolated in East and Southeast Asia. Phylogenetic analyses of the major capsid protein (MCP) and ATPase genes indicated that although these viruses shared considerable sequence identity, they could be divided into three tentative species, represented by RSIV, ISKNV and TRBIV, respectively. Whole genome analyses have been reported for several of these viruses. Sequence analysis detected a characteristic difference in the genetic composition of megalocytiviruses and other members of the family in reference to the large and small subunits of ribonucleotide reductase (RR-1, RR‑2). Megalocytiviruses contain only the RR-2 gene, which is of eukaryotic origin; whereas the other genera encode both the RR-1 and RR-2 genes which are thought to originate from Rickettsia-like a-proteobacteria. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Viruses Infecting Fish, Amphibians, and Reptiles)
Open AccessReview Ready, Set, Fuse! The Coronavirus Spike Protein and Acquisition of Fusion Competence
Viruses 2012, 4(4), 557-580; doi:10.3390/v4040557
Received: 15 March 2012 / Revised: 29 March 2012 / Accepted: 2 April 2012 / Published: 12 April 2012
Cited by 28 | PDF Full-text (692 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Coronavirus-cell entry programs involve virus-cell membrane fusions mediated by viral spike (S) proteins. Coronavirus S proteins acquire membrane fusion competence by receptor interactions, proteolysis, and acidification in endosomes. This review describes our current understanding of the S proteins, their interactions with and [...] Read more.
Coronavirus-cell entry programs involve virus-cell membrane fusions mediated by viral spike (S) proteins. Coronavirus S proteins acquire membrane fusion competence by receptor interactions, proteolysis, and acidification in endosomes. This review describes our current understanding of the S proteins, their interactions with and their responses to these entry triggers. We focus on receptors and proteases in prompting entry and highlight the type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) known to activate several virus fusion proteins. These and other proteases are essential cofactors permitting coronavirus infection, conceivably being in proximity to cell-surface receptors and thus poised to split entering spike proteins into the fragments that refold to mediate membrane fusion. The review concludes by noting how understanding of coronavirus entry informs antiviral therapies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Virus-Induced Membrane Fusion)
Open AccessReview Paramyxovirus Fusion and Entry: Multiple Paths to a Common End
Viruses 2012, 4(4), 613-636; doi:10.3390/v4040613
Received: 8 March 2012 / Revised: 10 March 2012 / Accepted: 12 April 2012 / Published: 19 April 2012
Cited by 55 | PDF Full-text (2429 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The paramyxovirus family contains many common human pathogenic viruses, including measles, mumps, the parainfluenza viruses, respiratory syncytial virus, human metapneumovirus, and the zoonotic henipaviruses, Hendra and Nipah. While the expression of a type 1 fusion protein and a type 2 attachment protein [...] Read more.
The paramyxovirus family contains many common human pathogenic viruses, including measles, mumps, the parainfluenza viruses, respiratory syncytial virus, human metapneumovirus, and the zoonotic henipaviruses, Hendra and Nipah. While the expression of a type 1 fusion protein and a type 2 attachment protein is common to all paramyxoviruses, there is considerable variation in viral attachment, the activation and triggering of the fusion protein, and the process of viral entry. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the understanding of paramyxovirus F protein-mediated membrane fusion, an essential process in viral infectivity. We also review the role of the other surface glycoproteins in receptor binding and viral entry, and the implications for viral infection. Throughout, we concentrate on the commonalities and differences in fusion triggering and viral entry among the members of the family. Finally, we highlight key unanswered questions and how further studies can identify novel targets for the development of therapeutic treatments against these human pathogens. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Virus-Induced Membrane Fusion)

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