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Pharmaceutics, Volume 8, Issue 3 (September 2016)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Novel Solid Self-Nanoemulsifying Drug Delivery System (S-SNEDDS) for Oral Delivery of Olmesartan Medoxomil: Design, Formulation, Pharmacokinetic and Bioavailability Evaluation
Pharmaceutics 2016, 8(3), 20; doi:10.3390/pharmaceutics8030020
Received: 20 April 2016 / Revised: 9 June 2016 / Accepted: 14 June 2016 / Published: 27 June 2016
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Abstract
The main purpose of this study was to develop a solid self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (S-SNEDDS) of Olmesartan (OLM) for enhancement of its solubility and dissolution rate. In this study, liquid SNEDDS containing Olmesartan was formulated and further developed into a solid form
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The main purpose of this study was to develop a solid self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (S-SNEDDS) of Olmesartan (OLM) for enhancement of its solubility and dissolution rate. In this study, liquid SNEDDS containing Olmesartan was formulated and further developed into a solid form by the spray drying technique using Aerosil 200 as a solid carrier. Based on the preliminary screening of different unloaded SNEDDS formulae, eight formulae of OLM loaded SNEEDS were prepared using Capryol 90, Cremophor RH40 and Transcutol HP as oil, surfactant and cosurfactant, respectively. Results showed that the mean droplet size of all reconstituted SNEDDS was found to be in the nanometric range (14.91–22.97 nm) with optimum PDI values (0.036–0.241). All formulae also showed rapid emulsification time (15.46 ± 1.34–24.17 ± 1.47 s), good optical clarity (98.33% ± 0.16%–99.87% ± 0.31%) and high drug loading efficiency (96.41% ± 1.20%–99.65% ± 1.11%). TEM analysis revealed the formation of spherical and homogeneous droplets with a size smaller than 50 nm. In vitro release of OLM from SNEDDS formulae showed that more than 90% of OLM released in approximately 90 min. Optimized SNEDDS formulae were selected to be developed into S-SNEDDS using the spray drying technique. The prepared S-SNEDDS formulae were evaluated for flow properties, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), reconstitution properties, drug content and in vitro dissolution study. It was found that S-SNEDDS formulae showed good flow properties and high drug content. Reconstitution properties of S-SNEDDS showed spontaneous self-nanoemulsification and no sign of phase separation. DSC thermograms revealed that OLM was in solubilized form and FTIR supported these findings. SEM photographs showed smooth uniform surface of S-SNEDDS with less aggregation. Results of the in vitro drug release showed that there was great enhancement in the dissolution rate of OLM. To clarify the possible improvement in pharmacokinetic behavior of OLM S-SNEDDS, plasma concentration-time curve profiles of OLM after the oral administration of optimized S-SNEDDS formula (F3) were compared to marketed product and pure drug in suspension. At all time points, it was observed that OLM plasma concentrations in rats treated with S-SNEDDS were significantly higher than those treated with the drug in suspension and marketed product. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Investigation of the Dermal Absorption and Irritation Potential of Sertaconazole Nitrate Anhydrous Gel
Pharmaceutics 2016, 8(3), 21; doi:10.3390/pharmaceutics8030021
Received: 28 February 2016 / Revised: 6 June 2016 / Accepted: 24 June 2016 / Published: 7 July 2016
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Abstract
Effective topical therapy of cutaneous fungal diseases requires the delivery of the active agent to the target site in adequate concentrations to produce a pharmacological effect and inhibit the growth of the pathogen. In addition, it is important to determine the concentration of
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Effective topical therapy of cutaneous fungal diseases requires the delivery of the active agent to the target site in adequate concentrations to produce a pharmacological effect and inhibit the growth of the pathogen. In addition, it is important to determine the concentration of the drug in the skin in order to evaluate the subsequent efficacy and potential toxicity for topical formulations. For this purpose, an anhydrous gel containing sertaconazole nitrate as a model drug was formulated and the amount of the drug in the skin was determined by in vitro tape stripping. The apparent diffusivity and partition coefficients were then calculated by a mathematical model describing the dermal absorption as passive diffusion through a pseudo-homogenous membrane. The skin irritation potential of the formulation was also assessed by using the in vitro Epiderm™ model. An estimation of the dermal absorption parameters allowed us to evaluate drug transport across the stratum corneum following topical application. The estimated concentration for the formulation was found to be higher than the MIC100 at the target site which suggested its potential efficacy for treating fungal infections. The skin irritation test showed the formulation to be non-irritating in nature. Thus, in vitro techniques can be used for laying the groundwork in developing efficient and non-toxic topical products. Full article
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Open AccessArticle 2-O-Acyl-3-O-(1-acyloxyalkyl) Prodrugs of 5,6-Isopropylidene-l-Ascorbic Acid and l-Ascorbic Acid: Antioxidant Activity and Ability to Permeate Silicone Membranes
Pharmaceutics 2016, 8(3), 22; doi:10.3390/pharmaceutics8030022
Received: 25 April 2016 / Revised: 21 June 2016 / Accepted: 7 July 2016 / Published: 18 July 2016
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Abstract
2-O-Acyl-3-O-(1-acyloxyalkyl) prodrug derivatives, 15, of 5,6-isopropylidene-l-ascorbic acid, VCA, and l-ascorbic acid, VC, have been characterized by measuring (1) their solubilities in water (SAQ) and in 1-octanol (SOCT); (2) the
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2-O-Acyl-3-O-(1-acyloxyalkyl) prodrug derivatives, 15, of 5,6-isopropylidene-l-ascorbic acid, VCA, and l-ascorbic acid, VC, have been characterized by measuring (1) their solubilities in water (SAQ) and in 1-octanol (SOCT); (2) the ability of one member of the homologous series, 15a, to diffuse through a silicone membrane from its application in propylene glycol:water (PG:AQ), 30:70; (3) the ability of another member of the series, 15e, to express cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) in HaCaT cells; and (4) the ability of 15e to support cell viability in HaCaT cells. All of the prodrugs were more soluble in 1-octanol than VC or VCA were. 15a, which exhibited a good balance between SOCT and SAQ, was found to deliver approximately 15 times more 15a than VCA delivered VCA through a silicone membrane from PG:AQ, 30:70. Under those conditions, no VC permeated the membrane. 15e, which hydrolyzed to release acetaldehyde as a byproduct instead of the toxin formaldehyde, exhibited approximately 30 times the antioxidant activity of VC in CaHaT cells and supported cell viability up to 900 μM in HaCaT cells. Full article
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Open AccessArticle TPGS-Stabilized Curcumin Nanoparticles Exhibit Superior Effect on Carrageenan-Induced Inflammation in Wistar Rat
Pharmaceutics 2016, 8(3), 24; doi:10.3390/pharmaceutics8030024
Received: 4 June 2016 / Revised: 26 July 2016 / Accepted: 8 August 2016 / Published: 16 August 2016
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Abstract
Curcumin, a hydrophobic polyphenol compound derived from the rhizome of the Curcuma genus, has a wide spectrum of biological and pharmacological applications. Previously, curcumin nanoparticles with different stabilizers had been produced successfully in order to enhance solubility and per oral absorption. In the
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Curcumin, a hydrophobic polyphenol compound derived from the rhizome of the Curcuma genus, has a wide spectrum of biological and pharmacological applications. Previously, curcumin nanoparticles with different stabilizers had been produced successfully in order to enhance solubility and per oral absorption. In the present study, we tested the anti-inflammatory effect of d-α-Tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS)-stabilized curcumin nanoparticles in vivo. Lambda-carrageenan (λ-carrageenan) was used to induce inflammation in rats; it was given by an intraplantar route and intrapelurally through surgery in the pleurisy test. In the λ-carrageenan-induced edema model, TPGS-stabilized curcumin nanoparticles were given orally one hour before induction and at 0.5, 4.5, and 8.5 h after induction with two different doses (1.8 and 0.9 mg/kg body weight (BW)). Sodium diclofenac with a dose of 4.5 mg/kg BW was used as a standard drug. A physical mixture of curcumin-TPGS was also used as a comparison with a higher dose of 60 mg/kg BW. The anti-inflammatory effect was assessed on the edema in the carrageenan-induced paw edema model and by the volume of exudate as well as the number of leukocytes reduced in the pleurisy test. TPGS-stabilized curcumin nanoparticles with lower doses showed better anti-inflammatory effects, indicating the greater absorption capability through the gastrointestinal tract. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanocrystals)
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Open AccessArticle Influence of the Encapsulation Efficiency and Size of Liposome on the Oral Bioavailability of Griseofulvin-Loaded Liposomes
Pharmaceutics 2016, 8(3), 25; doi:10.3390/pharmaceutics8030025
Received: 7 May 2016 / Revised: 24 July 2016 / Accepted: 8 August 2016 / Published: 26 August 2016
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Abstract
The objective of the present study was to investigate the influence of the encapsulation efficiency and size of liposome on the oral bioavailability of griseofulvin-loaded liposomes. Griseofulvin-loaded liposomes with desired characteristics were prepared from pro-liposome using various techniques. To study the effect of
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The objective of the present study was to investigate the influence of the encapsulation efficiency and size of liposome on the oral bioavailability of griseofulvin-loaded liposomes. Griseofulvin-loaded liposomes with desired characteristics were prepared from pro-liposome using various techniques. To study the effect of encapsulation efficiency, three preparations of griseofulvin, namely, griseofulvin aqueous suspension and two griseofulvin-loaded liposomes with different amounts of griseofulvin encapsulated [i.e., F1 (32%) and F2(98%)], were administered to rats. On the other hand, to study the effect of liposome size, the rats were given three different griseofulvin-loaded liposomes of various sizes, generated via different mechanical dispersion techniques [i.e., FTS (142 nm), MS (357 nm) and NS (813 nm)], but with essentially similar encapsulation efficiencies (about 93%). Results indicated that the extent of bioavailability of griseofulvin was improved 1.7–2.0 times when given in the form of liposomes (F1) compared to griseofulvin suspension. Besides that, there was an approximately two-fold enhancement of the extent of bioavailability following administration of griseofulvin-loaded liposomes with higher encapsulation efficiency (F2), compared to those of F1. Also, the results showed that the extent of bioavailability of liposomal formulations with smaller sizes were higher by approximately three times compared to liposomal formulation of a larger size. Nevertheless, a further size reduction of griseofulvin-loaded liposome (≤400 nm) did not promote the uptake or bioavailability of griseofulvin. In conclusion, high drug encapsulation efficiency and small liposome size could enhance the oral bioavailability of griseofulvin-loaded liposomes and therefore these two parameters deserve careful consideration during formulation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Liposome Technologies 2015)
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Open AccessArticle Tolterodine Tartrate Proniosomal Gel Transdermal Delivery for Overactive Bladder
Pharmaceutics 2016, 8(3), 27; doi:10.3390/pharmaceutics8030027
Received: 9 June 2016 / Revised: 25 August 2016 / Accepted: 26 August 2016 / Published: 31 August 2016
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Abstract
The goal of this study was to formulate and evaluate side effects of transdermal delivery of proniosomal gel compared to oral tolterodine tartrate (TT) for the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB). Proniosomal gels are surfactants, lipids and soy lecithin, prepared by coacervation phase
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The goal of this study was to formulate and evaluate side effects of transdermal delivery of proniosomal gel compared to oral tolterodine tartrate (TT) for the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB). Proniosomal gels are surfactants, lipids and soy lecithin, prepared by coacervation phase separation. Formulations were analyzed for drug entrapment efficiency (EE), vesicle size, surface morphology, attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, in vitro skin permeation, and in vivo effects. The EE was 44.87%–91.68% and vesicle size was 253–845 nm for Span formulations and morphology showed a loose structure. The stability and skin irritancy test were also carried out for the optimized formulations. Span formulations with cholesterol-containing formulation S1 and glyceryl distearate as well as lecithin containing S3 formulation showed higher cumulative percent of permeation such as 42% and 35%, respectively. In the in vivo salivary secretion model, S1 proniosomal gel had faster recovery, less cholinergic side effect on the salivary gland compared with that of oral TT. Histologically, bladder of rats treated with the proniosomal gel formulation S1 showed morphological improvements greater than those treated with S3. This study demonstrates the potential of proniosomal vesicles for transdermal delivery of TT to treat OAB. Full article
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Open AccessArticle An Accelerated Release Study to Evaluate Long-Acting Contraceptive Levonorgestrel-Containing in Situ Forming Depot Systems
Pharmaceutics 2016, 8(3), 28; doi:10.3390/pharmaceutics8030028
Received: 18 May 2016 / Revised: 19 August 2016 / Accepted: 23 August 2016 / Published: 1 September 2016
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Abstract
Biodegradable polymer-based injectable in situ forming depot (ISD) systems that solidify in the body to form a solid or semisolid reservoir are becoming increasingly attractive as an injectable dosage form for sustained (months to years) parenteral drug delivery. Evaluation of long-term drug release
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Biodegradable polymer-based injectable in situ forming depot (ISD) systems that solidify in the body to form a solid or semisolid reservoir are becoming increasingly attractive as an injectable dosage form for sustained (months to years) parenteral drug delivery. Evaluation of long-term drug release from the ISD systems during the formulation development is laborious and costly. An accelerated release method that can effectively correlate the months to years of long-term release in a short time such as days or weeks is economically needed. However, no such accelerated ISD system release method has been reported in the literature to date. The objective of the current study was to develop a short-term accelerated in vitro release method for contraceptive levonorgestrel (LNG)-containing ISD systems to screen formulations for more than 3-month contraception after a single subcutaneous injection. The LNG-containing ISD formulations were prepared by using biodegradable poly(lactide-co-glycolide) and polylactic acid polymer and solvent mixtures containing N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone and benzyl benzoate or triethyl citrate. Drug release studies were performed under real-time (long-term) conditions (PBS, pH 7.4, 37 °C) and four accelerated (short-term) conditions: (A) PBS, pH 7.4, 50 °C; (B) 25% ethanol in PBS, pH 7.4, 50 °C; (C) 25% ethanol in PBS, 2% Tween 20, pH 7.4, 50 °C; and (D) 25% ethanol in PBS, 2% Tween 20, pH 9, 50 °C. The LNG release profile, including the release mechanism under the accelerated condition D within two weeks, correlated (r2 ≥ 0.98) well with that under real-time conditions at four months. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Rapid Quantification and Validation of Lipid Concentrations within Liposomes
Pharmaceutics 2016, 8(3), 29; doi:10.3390/pharmaceutics8030029
Received: 14 July 2016 / Revised: 18 August 2016 / Accepted: 2 September 2016 / Published: 13 September 2016
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Abstract
Quantification of the lipid content in liposomal adjuvants for subunit vaccine formulation is of extreme importance, since this concentration impacts both efficacy and stability. In this paper, we outline a high performance liquid chromatography-evaporative light scattering detector (HPLC-ELSD) method that allows for the
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Quantification of the lipid content in liposomal adjuvants for subunit vaccine formulation is of extreme importance, since this concentration impacts both efficacy and stability. In this paper, we outline a high performance liquid chromatography-evaporative light scattering detector (HPLC-ELSD) method that allows for the rapid and simultaneous quantification of lipid concentrations within liposomal systems prepared by three liposomal manufacturing techniques (lipid film hydration, high shear mixing, and microfluidics). The ELSD system was used to quantify four lipids: 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC), cholesterol, dimethyldioctadecylammonium (DDA) bromide, and ᴅ-(+)-trehalose 6,6′-dibehenate (TDB). The developed method offers rapidity, high sensitivity, direct linearity, and a good consistency on the responses (R2 > 0.993 for the four lipids tested). The corresponding limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 0.11 and 0.36 mg/mL (DMPC), 0.02 and 0.80 mg/mL (cholesterol), 0.06 and 0.20 mg/mL (DDA), and 0.05 and 0.16 mg/mL (TDB), respectively. HPLC-ELSD was shown to be a rapid and effective method for the quantification of lipids within liposome formulations without the need for lipid extraction processes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Liposome Technologies 2015)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Drug Delivery Approaches for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer
Pharmaceutics 2016, 8(3), 23; doi:10.3390/pharmaceutics8030023
Received: 14 June 2016 / Revised: 12 July 2016 / Accepted: 13 July 2016 / Published: 20 July 2016
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Abstract
Cervical cancer is a highly prevalent cancer that affects women around the world. With the availability of new technologies, researchers have increased their efforts to develop new drug delivery systems in cervical cancer chemotherapy. In this review, we summarized some of the recent
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Cervical cancer is a highly prevalent cancer that affects women around the world. With the availability of new technologies, researchers have increased their efforts to develop new drug delivery systems in cervical cancer chemotherapy. In this review, we summarized some of the recent research in systematic and localized drug delivery systems and compared the advantages and disadvantages of these methods. Full article
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Open AccessReview Performance Parameters and Characterizations of Nanocrystals: A Brief Review
Pharmaceutics 2016, 8(3), 26; doi:10.3390/pharmaceutics8030026
Received: 1 April 2016 / Revised: 22 June 2016 / Accepted: 22 August 2016 / Published: 30 August 2016
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Abstract
Poor bioavailability of drugs associated with their poor solubility limits the clinical effectiveness of almost 40% of the newly discovered drug moieties. Low solubility, coupled with a high log p value, high melting point and high dose necessitates exploration of alternative formulation strategies
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Poor bioavailability of drugs associated with their poor solubility limits the clinical effectiveness of almost 40% of the newly discovered drug moieties. Low solubility, coupled with a high log p value, high melting point and high dose necessitates exploration of alternative formulation strategies for such drugs. One such novel approach is formulation of the drugs as “Nanocrystals”. Nanocrystals are primarily comprised of drug and surfactants/stabilizers and are manufactured by “top-down” or “bottom-up” methods. Nanocrystals aid the clinical efficacy of drugs by various means such as enhancement of bioavailability, lowering of dose requirement, and facilitating sustained release of the drug. This effect is dependent on the various characteristics of nanocrystals (particle size, saturation solubility, dissolution velocity), which have an impact on the improved performance of the nanocrystals. Various sophisticated techniques have been developed to evaluate these characteristics. This article describes in detail the various characterization techniques along with a brief review of the significance of the various parameters on the performance of nanocrystals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanocrystals)
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