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Future Internet, Volume 3, Issue 2 (June 2011), Pages 87-174

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Research

Open AccessArticle A Service Oriented Architecture for Personalized Universal Media Access
Future Internet 2011, 3(2), 87-116; doi:10.3390/fi3020087
Received: 6 January 2011 / Revised: 3 February 2011 / Accepted: 18 March 3011 / Published: 1 April 2011
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1079 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Multimedia streaming means delivering continuous data to a plethora of client devices. Besides the actual data transport, this also needs a high degree of content adaptation respecting the end users’ needs given by content preferences, transcoding constraints, and device capabilities. Such adaptations can
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Multimedia streaming means delivering continuous data to a plethora of client devices. Besides the actual data transport, this also needs a high degree of content adaptation respecting the end users’ needs given by content preferences, transcoding constraints, and device capabilities. Such adaptations can be performed in many ways, usually on the media server. However, when it comes to content editing, like mixing in subtitles or picture-in-picture composition, relying on third party service providers may be necessary. For economic reasons this should be done in a service-oriented way, because a lot of adaptation modules can be reused within different adaptation workflows. Although service-oriented architectures have become widely accepted in the Web community, the multimedia environment is still dominated by monolithic systems. The main reason is the insufficient support for working with continuous data: generally the suitability of Web services for handling complex data types and state-full applications is still limited. In this paper we discuss extensions of Web service frameworks, and present a first implementation of a service-oriented framework for media streaming and digital item adaptation. The focus lies on the technical realization of the services. Our experimental results show the practicality of the actual deployment of service-oriented multimedia frameworks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Future Network Architectures)
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Open AccessArticle Using Online Tools to Assess Public Responses to Climate Change Mitigation Policies in Japan
Future Internet 2011, 3(2), 117-129; doi:10.3390/fi3020117
Received: 22 January 2011 / Revised: 3 March 2011 / Accepted: 21 March 2011 / Published: 1 April 2011
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (254 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
As a member of the Annex 1 countries to the Kyoto Protocol of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, Japan is committed to reducing 6% of the greenhouse gas emissions. In order to achieve this commitment, Japan has undertaken several major
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As a member of the Annex 1 countries to the Kyoto Protocol of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, Japan is committed to reducing 6% of the greenhouse gas emissions. In order to achieve this commitment, Japan has undertaken several major mitigation measures, one of which is the domestic measure that includes ecologically friendly lifestyle programs, utilizing natural energy, participating in local environmental activities, and amending environmental laws. Mitigation policies could be achieved if public responses were strong. As the internet has increasingly become an online platform for sharing environmental information, public responses to the need for reducing greenhouse gas emissions may be assessed using available online tools. We used Google Insights for Search, Google AdWords Keyword Tool, and Google Timeline View to assess public responses in Japan based on the interest shown for five search terms that define global climate change and its mitigation policies. Data on online search interests from January 04, 2004 to July 18, 2010 were analyzed according to locations and categories. Our study suggests that the search interests for the five chosen search terms dramatically increased, especially when new mitigation policies were introduced or when climate change related events were organized. Such a rapid increase indicates that the Japanese public strongly responds to climate change mitigation policies. Full article
Open AccessArticle Metadata For Identity Management of Population Registers
Future Internet 2011, 3(2), 130-143; doi:10.3390/fi3020130
Received: 21 January 2011 / Revised: 2 April 2011 / Accepted: 6 April 2011 / Published: 18 April 2011
PDF Full-text (352 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A population register is an inventory of residents within a country, with their characteristics (date of birth, sex, marital status, etc.) and other socio-economic data, such as occupation or education. However, data on population are also stored in numerous other public registers
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A population register is an inventory of residents within a country, with their characteristics (date of birth, sex, marital status, etc.) and other socio-economic data, such as occupation or education. However, data on population are also stored in numerous other public registers such as tax, land, building and housing, military, foreigners, vehicles, etc. Altogether they contain vast amounts of personal and sensitive information. Access to public information is granted by law in many countries, but this transparency is generally subject to tensions with data protection laws. This paper proposes a framework to analyze data access (or protection) requirements, as well as a model of metadata for data exchange. Full article
Open AccessArticle Mobile Phones Bridging the Digital Divide for Teens in the US?
Future Internet 2011, 3(2), 144-158; doi:10.3390/fi3020144
Received: 11 February 2011 / Revised: 17 March 2011 / Accepted: 3 May 2011 / Published: 13 May 2011
Cited by 13 | PDF Full-text (308 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In 2009, just 27% of American teens with mobile phones reported using their devices to access the internet. However, teens from lower income families and minority teens were significantly more likely to use their phones to go online. Together, these surprising trends suggest
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In 2009, just 27% of American teens with mobile phones reported using their devices to access the internet. However, teens from lower income families and minority teens were significantly more likely to use their phones to go online. Together, these surprising trends suggest a potential narrowing of the digital divide, offering internet access to those without other means of going online. This is an important move, as, in today’s society, internet access is central to active citizenship in general and teen citizenship in particular. Yet the cost of this move toward equal access is absorbed by those who can least afford it: Teenagers from low income households. Using survey and focus group data from a national study of “Teens and Mobile Phone Use” (released by Pew and the University of Michigan in 2010), this article helps identify and explain this and other emergent trends for teen use (as well as non-use) of the internet through mobile phones. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social Transformations from the Mobile Internet)
Open AccessArticle Evolving Web-Based Test Automation into Agile Business Specifications
Future Internet 2011, 3(2), 159-174; doi:10.3390/fi3020159
Received: 31 March 2011 / Revised: 26 May 2011 / Accepted: 27 May 2011 / Published: 3 June 2011
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (345 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Usually, test automation scripts for a web application directly mirror the actions that the tester carries out in the browser, but they tend to be verbose and repetitive, making them expensive to maintain and ineffective in an agile setting. Our research has focussed
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Usually, test automation scripts for a web application directly mirror the actions that the tester carries out in the browser, but they tend to be verbose and repetitive, making them expensive to maintain and ineffective in an agile setting. Our research has focussed on providing tool-support for business-level, example-based specifications that are mapped to the browser level for automatic verification. We provide refactoring support for the evolution of existing browser-level tests into business-level specifications. As resulting business rule tables may be incomplete, redundant or contradictory, our tool provides feedback on coverage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agile Practices)
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