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Nutrients 2018, 10(1), 87; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10010087

Guanidinoacetic Acid and Creatine are Associated with Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Healthy Men and Women: A Cross-Sectional Study

1
Faculty of Sport and Physical Education, University of Novi Sad, 21000 Novi Sad, Serbia
2
School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia
3
Faculty of Sciences, University of Novi Sad, 21000 Novi Sad, Serbia
4
Institute SUPERLAB, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia
5
Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Split, 21000 Split, Croatia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 8 November 2017 / Revised: 2 January 2018 / Accepted: 10 January 2018 / Published: 13 January 2018
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Abstract

Guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) conversion to creatine is thought to be involved in cardiometabolic disturbances through its role in biological methylation and insulin secretion. We evaluated the association of serum GAA and creatine with cardiometabolic risk factors in a cohort of 151 apparently healthy adults (82 women and 69 men) aged 18–63 years. Serum levels of GAA and creatine were measured with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. A multiple linear regression model adjusted for age and sex was employed to examine the relationship of serum GAA and creatine with cardiometabolic risk factors. Higher GAA levels were associated with an unfavorable cardiometabolic risk profile (higher insulin, higher total homocysteine, and higher body fat percentage), while having elevated serum creatine levels (≥31.1 µmol/L) was associated with being overweight (body mass index ≥ 25.0 kg/m). The results from our study suggest a possible role of the GAA–creatine axis in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. View Full-Text
Keywords: guanidinoacetic acid; creatine; cardiometabolic risk; homocysteine; overweight guanidinoacetic acid; creatine; cardiometabolic risk; homocysteine; overweight
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Ostojic, S.M.; Vranes, M.; Loncar, D.; Zenic, N.; Sekulic, D. Guanidinoacetic Acid and Creatine are Associated with Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Healthy Men and Women: A Cross-Sectional Study. Nutrients 2018, 10, 87.

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