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Nutrients 2018, 10(7), 891; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10070891

Serving Size and Nutrition Labelling: Implications for Nutrition Information and Nutrition Claims on Packaged Foods

1
Nutritional Epidemiology Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, World Health Organization, 69372 Lyon, France
2
Nutrition in Foodservice Research Centre (NUPPRE—Núcleo de Pesquisa de Nutrição em Produção de Refeições), Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC—Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina), Florianopolis 88040-900, Brazil
These authors contributed equally to the work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 15 May 2018 / Revised: 8 June 2018 / Accepted: 25 June 2018 / Published: 12 July 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Portion Size in Relation to Diet and Health)
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Abstract

The presentation of nutrition information on a serving size basis is a strategy that has been adopted by several countries to promote healthy eating. Variation in serving size, however, can alter the nutritional values reported on food labels and compromise the food choices made by the population. This narrative review aimed to discuss (1) current nutrition labelling legislation regarding serving size and (2) the implications of declared serving size for nutrition information available on packaged foods. Most countries with mandatory food labelling require that serving size be presented on food labels, but variation in this information is generally allowed. Studies have reported a lack of standardisation among serving sizes of similar products which may compromise the usability of nutrition information. Moreover, studies indicate that food companies may be varying serving sizes as a marketing strategy to stimulate sales by reporting lower values of certain nutrients or lower energy values on nutrition information labels. There is a need to define the best format for presenting serving size on food labels in order to provide clear and easily comprehensible nutrition information to the consumer. View Full-Text
Keywords: portion size; food labelling; nutrition information; processed foods; ultraprocessed foods portion size; food labelling; nutrition information; processed foods; ultraprocessed foods
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Kliemann, N.; Kraemer, M.V.S.; Scapin, T.; Rodrigues, V.M.; Fernandes, A.C.; Bernardo, G.L.; Uggioni, P.L.; Proença, R.P.C. Serving Size and Nutrition Labelling: Implications for Nutrition Information and Nutrition Claims on Packaged Foods. Nutrients 2018, 10, 891.

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