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Nutrients 2017, 9(4), 411; doi:10.3390/nu9040411

Endurance Training with or without Glucose-Fructose Ingestion: Effects on Lactate Metabolism Assessed in a Randomized Clinical Trial on Sedentary Men

1
Department of Physiology, University of Lausanne, CH-1005 Lausanne, Switzerland
2
Centre for Research in Human Nutrition Rhône-Alpes and European Centre of Nutrition for Health, Lyon 1 University, INSERM, Hospices Civils de Lyon, F-69310 Pierre Bénite, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 26 February 2017 / Revised: 16 April 2017 / Accepted: 18 April 2017 / Published: 20 April 2017
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Abstract

Glucose-fructose ingestion increases glucose and lactate oxidation during exercise. We hypothesized that training with glucose-fructose would induce key adaptations in lactate metabolism. Two groups of eight sedentary males were endurance-trained for three weeks while ingesting either glucose-fructose (GF) or water (C). Effects of glucose-fructose on lactate appearance, oxidation, and clearance were measured at rest and during exercise, pre-training, and post-training. Pre-training, resting lactate appearance was 3.6 ± 0.5 vs. 3.6 ± 0.4 mg·kg−1·min−1 in GF and C, and was increased to 11.2 ± 1.4 vs. 8.8 ± 0.7 mg·kg−1·min−1 by exercise (Exercise: p < 0.01). Lactate oxidation represented 20.6% ± 1.0% and 17.5% ± 1.7% of lactate appearance at rest, and 86.3% ± 3.8% and 86.8% ± 6.6% during exercise (Exercise: p < 0.01) in GF and C, respectively. Training with GF increased resting lactate appearance and oxidation (Training × Intervention: both p < 0.05), but not during exercise (Training × Intervention: both p > 0.05). Training with GF and C had similar effects to increase lactate clearance during exercise (+15.5 ± 9.2 and +10.1 ± 5.9 mL·kg−1·min−1; Training: p < 0.01; Training × Intervention: p = 0.97). The findings of this study show that in sedentary participants, glucose-fructose ingestion leads to high systemic lactate appearance, most of which is disposed non-oxidatively at rest and is oxidized during exercise. Training with or without glucose-fructose increases lactate clearance, without altering lactate appearance and oxidation during exercise. View Full-Text
Keywords: glucose; fructose; lactate; lactate metabolism; substrate oxidation; carbohydrate; exercise glucose; fructose; lactate; lactate metabolism; substrate oxidation; carbohydrate; exercise
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Rosset, R.; Lecoultre, V.; Egli, L.; Cros, J.; Rey, V.; Stefanoni, N.; Sauvinet, V.; Laville, M.; Schneiter, P.; Tappy, L. Endurance Training with or without Glucose-Fructose Ingestion: Effects on Lactate Metabolism Assessed in a Randomized Clinical Trial on Sedentary Men. Nutrients 2017, 9, 411.

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