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Catalysts 2017, 7(10), 299; doi:10.3390/catal7100299

Biotransformation of Ergostane Triterpenoid Antcin K from Antrodia cinnamomea by Soil-Isolated Psychrobacillus sp. AK 1817

1
Department of Biotechnology, Chia Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, No. 60, Sec. 1, Erh-Jen Rd., Jen-Te District, Tainan 71710, Taiwan
2
Biodiversity Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan
3
Department of Biological Sciences and Technology, National University of Tainan, No. 33, Sec. 2, Shu-Lin St., Tainan 70005, Taiwan
4
Department of Food Science, National Quemoy University, No. 1, University Road., Jin-Ning Township, Kinmen County 892, Taiwan
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 22 September 2017 / Revised: 2 October 2017 / Accepted: 3 October 2017 / Published: 11 October 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Catalyzed Synthesis of Natural Products)
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Abstract

Antcin K is one of the major ergostane triterpenoids from the fruiting bodies of Antrodia cinnamomea, a parasitic fungus that grows only on the inner heartwood wall of the aromatic tree Cinnamomum kanehirai Hay (Lauraceae). To search for strains that have the ability to biotransform antcin K, a total of 4311 strains of soil bacteria were isolated, and their abilities to catalyze antcin K were determined by ultra-performance liquid chromatography analysis. One positive strain, AK 1817, was selected for functional studies. The strain was identified as Psychrobacillus sp., based on the DNA sequences of the 16S rRNA gene. The biotransformation metabolites were purified with the preparative high-performance liquid chromatography method and identified as antcamphin E and antcamphin F, respectively, based on the mass and nuclear magnetic resonance spectral data. The present study is the first to report the biotransformation of triterpenoids from A. cinnamomea (Antrodia cinnamomea). View Full-Text
Keywords: Antrodia cinnamomea; biotransformation; antcin K; triterpenoid; Psychrobacillus Antrodia cinnamomea; biotransformation; antcin K; triterpenoid; Psychrobacillus
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MDPI and ACS Style

Chiang, C.-M.; Wang, T.-Y.; Ke, A.-N.; Chang, T.-S.; Wu, J.-Y. Biotransformation of Ergostane Triterpenoid Antcin K from Antrodia cinnamomea by Soil-Isolated Psychrobacillus sp. AK 1817. Catalysts 2017, 7, 299.

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