Next Article in Journal
Investigating the Combined Effect of Tillage, Nitrogen Fertilization and Cover Crops on Nitrogen Use Efficiency in Winter Wheat
Previous Article in Journal
Evaluating Agricultural Management Effects on Alachlor Availability: Tillage, Green Manure, and Biochar
Article Menu
Issue 4 (December) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Agronomy 2017, 7(4), 65; doi:10.3390/agronomy7040065

Effect of Vegetative Propagation Materials on Globe Artichoke Production in Semi-Arid Developing Countries: Agronomic, Marketable and Qualitative Traits

1
Département de Production Végétale, Institut National Agronomique de Tunisie, 43 Avenue Charles Nicolle, Tunis 1082, Tunisia
2
Department of Agriculture, Food, Natural Resources, Animals and Environment, University of Padova, Campus of Agripolis, Viale dell’Università 16, 35020 Legnaro (PD), Italy
3
Station d‘Appui de Manouba, Groupement Interprofessionnel des Légumes (SAM), Manouba 1120, Tunisia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 31 August 2017 / Revised: 19 September 2017 / Accepted: 21 September 2017 / Published: 24 September 2017
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [3702 KB, uploaded 24 September 2017]   |  

Abstract

In Tunisia, globe artichoke is mainly propagated by underground dormant axillary buds (ovoli), which are removed from the field in August during the quiescence period. The high cost of in vitro-plants and the absence of specialized nurseries were among the reasons for the rise of heterogeneity and spread of diseases. The aim was to help farmers to improve artichoke yield and quality by ameliorating their vegetative propagation technique with low cost methods. Three plant cuttings management methods were tested: summer ovoli (T0); spring offshoots nursery’s cuttings forced to pass a vegetative rest period by stopping irrigation (T1); and offshoots nursery’s cuttings not forced (T2). The cuttings management can affect both yield and qualitative traits of artichoke. T1 nursery plants produced the heaviest primary heads, 7% and 23% higher than T2 and T0, respectively. T1 plants exhibited the highest yield during the harvest season, with +17.7% and +12.2% compared to T0 and T2, respectively. T0 and T1 showed the highest total antioxidant capacity and inulin content; the propagation method also affected the short-chain sugars ratio. T1 is a viable and sustainable alternative to the traditional one that does not heavily impact on growing costs and improves yield and quality of artichoke. View Full-Text
Keywords: Cynara scolymus; cuttings; yield; antioxidant; phenolic acids; fructans; sugars Cynara scolymus; cuttings; yield; antioxidant; phenolic acids; fructans; sugars
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Riahi, J.; Nicoletto, C.; Bouzaein, G.; Sambo, P.; Khalfallah, K.K. Effect of Vegetative Propagation Materials on Globe Artichoke Production in Semi-Arid Developing Countries: Agronomic, Marketable and Qualitative Traits. Agronomy 2017, 7, 65.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Agronomy EISSN 2073-4395 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top