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J. Pers. Med., Volume 7, Issue 1 (March 2017)

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Review

Open AccessReview Biomarker-Guided Non-Adaptive Trial Designs in Phase II and Phase III: A Methodological Review
J. Pers. Med. 2017, 7(1), 1; doi:10.3390/jpm7010001
Received: 8 October 2016 / Revised: 6 December 2016 / Accepted: 11 January 2017 / Published: 25 January 2017
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Abstract
Biomarker-guided treatment is a rapidly developing area of medicine, where treatment choice is personalised according to one or more of an individual’s biomarker measurements. A number of biomarker-guided trial designs have been proposed in the past decade, including both adaptive and non-adaptive trial
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Biomarker-guided treatment is a rapidly developing area of medicine, where treatment choice is personalised according to one or more of an individual’s biomarker measurements. A number of biomarker-guided trial designs have been proposed in the past decade, including both adaptive and non-adaptive trial designs which test the effectiveness of a biomarker-guided approach to treatment with the aim of improving patient health. A better understanding of them is needed as challenges occur both in terms of trial design and analysis. We have undertaken a comprehensive literature review based on an in-depth search strategy with a view to providing the research community with clarity in definition, methodology and terminology of the various biomarker-guided trial designs (both adaptive and non-adaptive designs) from a total of 211 included papers. In the present paper, we focus on non-adaptive biomarker-guided trial designs for which we have identified five distinct main types mentioned in 100 papers. We have graphically displayed each non-adaptive trial design and provided an in-depth overview of their key characteristics. Substantial variability has been observed in terms of how trial designs are described and particularly in the terminology used by different authors. Our comprehensive review provides guidance for those designing biomarker-guided trials. Full article
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Figure 1

Open AccessReview Methods for the In Vitro Characterization of Nanomedicines—Biological Component Interaction
J. Pers. Med. 2017, 7(1), 2; doi:10.3390/jpm7010002
Received: 11 November 2016 / Accepted: 25 January 2017 / Published: 27 January 2017
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Abstract
The design of colloidal nanosystems intended for biomedical applications, specifically in the field of personalized medicine, has increased notably in the last years. Consequently, a variety of characterization techniques devoted to studying nanomedicine interactions with proteins and cells have been developed, since a
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The design of colloidal nanosystems intended for biomedical applications, specifically in the field of personalized medicine, has increased notably in the last years. Consequently, a variety of characterization techniques devoted to studying nanomedicine interactions with proteins and cells have been developed, since a deep characterization of nanosystems is required before starting preclinical and clinical studies. In this context, this review aims to summarize the main techniques used to assess the interaction of nanomedicines with biological systems, highlighting their advantages and disadvantages. Testing designed nanomaterials with these techniques is required in order to have more information about their behavior on a physiological environment. Moreover, techniques used to study the interaction of nanomedicines with proteins, such as albumin and fibrinogen, are summarized. These interactions are not desired, since they usually are the first signal to the body for the activation of the immune system, which leads to the clearance of the exogenous components. On the other hand, techniques for studying the cell toxicity of nanosystems are also summarized, since this information is required before starting preclinical steps. The translation of knowledge from novel designed nanosystems at a research laboratory scale to real human therapies is usually a limiting or even a final point due to the lack of systematic studies regarding these two aspects: nanoparticle interaction with biological components and nanoparticle cytotoxicity. In conclusion, this review will be a useful support for those scientists aiming to develop nanosystems for nanomedicine purposes. Full article
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