Next Article in Journal
Conflict or Concert? Extending the Simmelian Triad to Account for Positive Third Party Presence in Face-to-Face Interviews with People Living with Parkinson’s Disease
Next Article in Special Issue
The Embodied Life Course: Post-ageism or the Renaturalization of Gender?
Previous Article in Journal
Child Murder in Nazi Germany: The Memory of Nazi Medical Crimes and Commemoration of “Children’s Euthanasia” Victims at Two Facilities (Eichberg, Kalmenhof)
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Place of Disgust: Disability, Class and Gender in Spaces of Workfare
Societies 2012, 2(3), 195-209; doi:10.3390/soc2030195
Article

Youth for Sale: Using Critical Disability Perspectives to Examine the Embodiment of ‘Youth’

Room 10110, Arundel Building, Sheffield Hallam University, 122 Charles Street, Sheffield, South Yorkshire S1 2NE, UK
Received: 26 October 2011 / Revised: 22 August 2012 / Accepted: 30 August 2012 / Published: 13 September 2012
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Embodied Action, Embodied Theory: Understanding the Body in Society)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [308 KB, uploaded 13 September 2012]

Abstract

‘Youth’ is more complicated than an age-bound period of life; although implicitly paired with developmentalism, youth is surrounded by contradictory discourses. In other work [1], I have asserted that young people are demonized as risky and rebellious, whilst simultaneously criticized for being lazy and apathetic; two intertwining, yet conflicting discourses meaning that young people’s here-and-now experiences take a backseat to a focus on reaching idealized, neoliberal adulthood [2]. Critical examination of adulthood ideals, however, shows us that ‘youthfulness’ is itself presented as a goal of adulthood [3–5], as there is a desire, as adults, to remain forever young [6]. As Blatterer puts it, the ideal is to be “adult and youthful but not adolescent” ([3], p. 74). This paper attempts to untangle some of the youth/adult confusion by asking how the aspiration/expectation of a youthful body plays out in the embodied lives of young dis/abled people. To do this, I use a feminist-disability lens to consider youth in an abstracted form, not as a life-stage, but as the end goal of an aesthetic project of the self that we are all (to differing degrees) encouraged to set out upon.
Keywords: youth; disability; feminist; feminist-disability; embodiment; time; crip time; sociology of childhood; commodification youth; disability; feminist; feminist-disability; embodiment; time; crip time; sociology of childhood; commodification
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 3.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

Further Mendeley | CiteULike
Export to BibTeX |
EndNote |
RIS
MDPI and ACS Style

Slater, J. Youth for Sale: Using Critical Disability Perspectives to Examine the Embodiment of ‘Youth’. Societies 2012, 2, 195-209.

View more citation formats

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Comments

[Return to top]
Societies EISSN 2075-4698 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert