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Arts, Volume 6, Issue 4 (December 2017)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle A Model of Triadic Post-Tonality for a Neoconservative Postmodern String Quartet by Sky Macklay
Arts 2017, 6(4), 15; doi:10.3390/arts6040015
Received: 18 February 2017 / Revised: 7 September 2017 / Accepted: 12 September 2017 / Published: 28 September 2017
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Abstract
This article proposes a non-plural perspective on the analysis of triadic music, offering Sky Macklay’s Many Many Cadences as a case study. Part one is a discussion of the work’s harmony-voice leading nexus, followed by a discussion of the five conditions of correspondence
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This article proposes a non-plural perspective on the analysis of triadic music, offering Sky Macklay’s Many Many Cadences as a case study. Part one is a discussion of the work’s harmony-voice leading nexus, followed by a discussion of the five conditions of correspondence as implied by this string quartet that articulate a single tonal identity. Part three focuses on a strictly kinematic analysis of the work’s harmonic progressions that evinces this identity and establishes its general applicability. In the final section, the data generated by this analysis conveys the inherent possibility of a single, all-encompassing kinematic, thereby pointing beyond the particularities of Many Many Cadences while informing my formal interpretation of the work. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Music and Performance)
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Open AccessArticle The Oval Engravings of Nabara 2 (Ennedi, Chad)
Arts 2017, 6(4), 16; doi:10.3390/arts6040016
Received: 1 August 2017 / Revised: 10 September 2017 / Accepted: 20 September 2017 / Published: 29 September 2017
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Abstract
By revisiting the Nabara 2 shelter in the southern Ennedi (Chad), some previously unreported paintings and a whole set of unexpected oval engravings were surveyed. These engravings, internally decorated with patterns of lines, some featured by a single longitudinal element or a sort
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By revisiting the Nabara 2 shelter in the southern Ennedi (Chad), some previously unreported paintings and a whole set of unexpected oval engravings were surveyed. These engravings, internally decorated with patterns of lines, some featured by a single longitudinal element or a sort of reticular structure, make Nabara 2 an unparalleled site among the hundreds known in the region. Comparison with similar motifs associated to human depictions found at the western termination of the Ennedi Highland suggests these engravings could be depictions of shields, attributable to the pastoral period. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection World Rock Art)
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Open AccessArticle Prescriptive Methodology as a Generative Tool: A Case Study Conducted at Introductory Interior Design Studio Level in the United Arab Emirates
Arts 2017, 6(4), 17; doi:10.3390/arts6040017
Received: 31 March 2017 / Revised: 28 August 2017 / Accepted: 1 September 2017 / Published: 28 September 2017
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Abstract
In the U.A.E. (United Arab Emirates), interior design education is often misunderstood as interior decoration, wherein the former is a more comprehensive design approach to spaces formed by structural boundaries and curation of human interaction. The conducted case study addressed a small number
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In the U.A.E. (United Arab Emirates), interior design education is often misunderstood as interior decoration, wherein the former is a more comprehensive design approach to spaces formed by structural boundaries and curation of human interaction. The conducted case study addressed a small number of students enrolled in Interior Design Studio I at Zayed University, Abu Dhabi campus. In addition to traditional teaching methods compromised of individual desk critique sessions, group pin-ups and presentations, three innovative methods were implemented as a means of guiding students through the process: direct sequential instruction executed within an assigned time frame, reflection on the surfaced result and use of flat photography or panoramas as means of space communication. Throughout the three implemented stages of the project, and through utilizing the above-described generative methodology, students achieved complex representation and revealed higher spatial order related to human occupation and space inhabitation. This methodology allowed students to channel their work through complex sets of interconnected information and derived an outcome from an accumulative multi-layered resolution. The article presents the process and analyses the achieved outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contemporary Architecture from the 20th Century to the Present)
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Open AccessArticle What Is Body, What Is Space? Performance and the Cinematic Body in a Non-Anthropocentric Cinema
Arts 2017, 6(4), 19; doi:10.3390/arts6040019
Received: 6 December 2016 / Revised: 15 May 2017 / Accepted: 23 October 2017 / Published: 9 November 2017
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Abstract
The assumption of a clear demarcation and hierarchy between figure and ground has long informed key approaches in film studies to bodies and space. However, many filmmakers working in both animation and live cinema have confounded this hierarchy, working with an integration of
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The assumption of a clear demarcation and hierarchy between figure and ground has long informed key approaches in film studies to bodies and space. However, many filmmakers working in both animation and live cinema have confounded this hierarchy, working with an integration of figure and ground on equal terms to explore the full performative potential of the cinematic body. In the animation work of Einar Baldvin, this strategy is an Expressionist one, blurring the boundaries between figure and ground in order to project affective and psychic states onto the space around the body. In Wong Kar-wai’s The Grandmaster, this blurring of boundaries between figure and ground eschews an Expressionist mode, working instead to render, in aesthetic form, a biophilosophy that emphasizes the continuity between bodies and environment to explore the possibilities of non-anthropocentric cinematic modes. An experimental writing style here serves to trace the energetic unfolding of these strategies across both films in order to frame the question, ‘what is body here, what is space’, and to ask how we as viewers engage with this embodied mode. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cinematic Bodies)
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Open AccessArticle A Geometrical Method for Sound-Hole Size and Location Enhancement in Lute Family Musical Instruments: The Golden Method
Arts 2017, 6(4), 20; doi:10.3390/arts6040020
Received: 5 May 2017 / Revised: 5 October 2017 / Accepted: 20 November 2017 / Published: 28 November 2017
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Abstract
This paper presents a new analytical approach, the Golden Method, to enhance sound-hole size and location in musical instruments of the lute family in order to obtain better sound damping characteristics based on the concept of the golden ratio and the instrument geometry.
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This paper presents a new analytical approach, the Golden Method, to enhance sound-hole size and location in musical instruments of the lute family in order to obtain better sound damping characteristics based on the concept of the golden ratio and the instrument geometry. The main objective of the paper is to increase the capability of lute family musical instruments in keeping a note for a certain time at a certain level to enhance the instruments’ orchestral characteristics. For this purpose, a geometry-based analytical method, the Golden Method is first described in detail in an itemized feature. A new musical instrument is then developed and tested to confirm the ability of the Golden Method in optimizing the acoustical characteristics of musical instruments from a damping point of view by designing the modified sound-hole. Finally, the new-developed instrument is tested, and the obtained results are compared with those of two well-known instruments to confirm the effectiveness of the proposed method. The experimental results show that the suggested method is able to increase the sound damping time by at least 2.4% without affecting the frequency response function and other acoustic characteristics of the instrument. This methodology could be used as the first step in future studies on design, optimization and evaluation of musical instruments of the lute family (e.g., lute, oud, barbat, mandolin, setar, and etc.). Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Music and Performance)
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Other

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Open AccessEssay Art in the Age of Machine Intelligence
Arts 2017, 6(4), 18; doi:10.3390/arts6040018
Received: 7 September 2017 / Revised: 7 September 2017 / Accepted: 29 September 2017 / Published: 29 September 2017
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Abstract
In this wide‐ranging essay, the leader of Google’s Seattle AI group and founder of the Artists and Machine Intelligence program discusses the long‐standing and complex relationship between art and technology. The transformation of artistic practice and theory that attended the 19th century photographic
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In this wide‐ranging essay, the leader of Google’s Seattle AI group and founder of the Artists and Machine Intelligence program discusses the long‐standing and complex relationship between art and technology. The transformation of artistic practice and theory that attended the 19th century photographic revolution is explored as a parallel for the current revolution in machine intelligence, which promises not only to mechanize (or democratize) the means of reproduction, but also of production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Machine as Artist (for the 21st Century))
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