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Nanomaterials, Volume 1, Issue 1 (December 2011), Pages 1-88

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial Another Journal on Nanomaterials?
Nanomaterials 2011, 1(1), 1-2; doi:10.3390/nano1010001
Received: 20 October 2010 / Accepted: 1 November 2010 / Published: 4 November 2010
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (20 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
It is my great pleasure to welcome you to Nanomaterials, a new open access journal, which is dedicated to the fabrication, characterization, functionalization, modeling and application of nanomaterials. In answer to the title question, I would like to (mis)quote one of my
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It is my great pleasure to welcome you to Nanomaterials, a new open access journal, which is dedicated to the fabrication, characterization, functionalization, modeling and application of nanomaterials. In answer to the title question, I would like to (mis)quote one of my favourite pieces of literature: I "[We] hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men ... are endowed ... with certain unalienable rights, that among these are ..." free access to information and education. The prime goal of Nanomaterials is to publish first-class, original research articles under an open access policy with minimal fees for the authors. The quality of the published articles will be assured by a fast yet rigorous peer-review process. [...] Full article

Research

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Open AccessArticle Films, Buckypapers and Fibers from Clay, Chitosan and Carbon Nanotubes
Nanomaterials 2011, 1(1), 3-19; doi:10.3390/nano1010003
Received: 10 February 2011 / Revised: 17 March 2011 / Accepted: 23 March 2011 / Published: 6 April 2011
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Abstract
The mechanical and electrical characteristics of films, buckypapers and fiber materials from combinations of clay, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and chitosan are described. The rheological time-dependent characteristics of clay are maintained in clay–carbon nanotube–chitosan composite dispersions. It is demonstrated that the addition of chitosan
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The mechanical and electrical characteristics of films, buckypapers and fiber materials from combinations of clay, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and chitosan are described. The rheological time-dependent characteristics of clay are maintained in clay–carbon nanotube–chitosan composite dispersions. It is demonstrated that the addition of chitosan improves their mechanical characteristics, but decreases electrical conductivity by three-orders of magnitude compared to clay–CNT materials. We show that the electrical response upon exposure to humid atmosphere is influenced by clay-chitosan interactions, i.e., the resistance of clay–CNT materials decreases, whereas that of clay–CNT–chitosan increases. Full article
Open AccessArticle Metallic Nanoparticle Block Copoloymer Vesicles with Enhanced Optical Properties
Nanomaterials 2011, 1(1), 20-30; doi:10.3390/nano1010020
Received: 28 February 2011 / Revised: 8 April 2011 / Accepted: 3 May 2011 / Published: 9 May 2011
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (2374 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The fabrication and characterization of template silver nanoshell structures and the encapsulation of gold nanoparticles using biocompatible poly(oxyethylene)-poly(butylene) diblock co-polymer vesicles is described in this work. These vesicles have a narrow diameter size distribution around 200 nm. Silver nanoparticles (Ø = 1–10
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The fabrication and characterization of template silver nanoshell structures and the encapsulation of gold nanoparticles using biocompatible poly(oxyethylene)-poly(butylene) diblock co-polymer vesicles is described in this work. These vesicles have a narrow diameter size distribution around 200 nm. Silver nanoparticles (Ø = 1–10 nm) functionalized with decanethiol were successfully entrapped in the hydrophobic membrane and non-functionalized gold nanoparticles (Ø = 3.0–5.5 nm) were encapsulated in the vesicle core. Transmission Electron Microscopy confirms the localisation of the particles; silver functionalized nanoparticles appear to thicken the vesicle membrane as shown with TEM image analysis. The enhancement of the optical properties is confirmed using transmission spectrophotometry; the 430 nm plasmon resonance peak of the silver nanoparticles was replaced by a broader extinction spectrum to beyond 700 nm (O.D. = 0.8). For a number density of 4.8 x 1012 mL-1 the scattering cross section was calculated to be 0.92 x 10-4 μm2 with a scattering coefficient of 0.44 mm-1. The measurements indicate scattering cross section of 3.8 x 10-5 μm2, attenuation coefficient of 0.18 mm-1 and extinction efficiency equal to 1.2 x 10-3. Stable and biocompatible block co-polymer vesicles can potentially be used as plasmon-resonant optical contrast agents for biomedical applications. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Fabrication of Size-Tunable Metallic Nanoparticles Using Plasmid DNA as a Biomolecular Reactor
Nanomaterials 2011, 1(1), 64-78; doi:10.3390/nano1010064
Received: 28 July 2011 / Revised: 26 September 2011 / Accepted: 10 October 2011 / Published: 21 October 2011
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (2622 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Plasmid DNA can be used as a template to yield gold, palladium, silver, and chromium nanoparticles of different sizes based on variations in incubation time at 70 °C with gold phosphine complexes, with the acetates of silver or palladium, or chromium acetylacetonate. The
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Plasmid DNA can be used as a template to yield gold, palladium, silver, and chromium nanoparticles of different sizes based on variations in incubation time at 70 °C with gold phosphine complexes, with the acetates of silver or palladium, or chromium acetylacetonate. The employment of mild synthetic conditions, minimal procedural steps, and aqueous solvents makes this method environmentally greener and ensures general feasibility. The use of plasmids exploits the capabilities of the biotechnology industry as a source of nanoreactor materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue From Molecules to Nanomaterials)

Review

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Open AccessReview Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles and Their Biomedical Applications
Nanomaterials 2011, 1(1), 31-63; doi:10.3390/nano1010031
Received: 18 March 2011 / Revised: 3 June 2011 / Accepted: 8 June 2011 / Published: 14 June 2011
Cited by 175 | PDF Full-text (1051 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Metal nanoparticles are being extensively used in various biomedical applications due to their small size to volume ratio and extensive thermal stability. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are an obvious choice due to their amenability of synthesis and functionalization, less toxicity and ease of detection.
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Metal nanoparticles are being extensively used in various biomedical applications due to their small size to volume ratio and extensive thermal stability. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are an obvious choice due to their amenability of synthesis and functionalization, less toxicity and ease of detection. The present review focuses on various methods of functionalization of GNPs and their applications in biomedical research. Functionalization facilitates targeted delivery of these nanoparticles to various cell types, bioimaging, gene delivery, drug delivery and other therapeutic and diagnostic applications. This review is an amalgamation of recent advances in the field of functionalization of gold nanoparticles and their potential applications in the field of medicine and biology. Full article
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Open AccessReview Quantum Dot Sensitized Photoelectrodes
Nanomaterials 2011, 1(1), 79-88; doi:10.3390/nano1010079
Received: 18 October 2011 / Accepted: 26 October 2011 / Published: 15 November 2011
Cited by 13 | PDF Full-text (134 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Quantum Dots (QDs) are promising alternatives to organic dyes as sensitisers for photocatalytic electrodes. This review article provides an overview of the current state of the art in this area. More specifically, different types of QDs with a special focus on heavy-metal free
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Quantum Dots (QDs) are promising alternatives to organic dyes as sensitisers for photocatalytic electrodes. This review article provides an overview of the current state of the art in this area. More specifically, different types of QDs with a special focus on heavy-metal free QDs and the methods for preparation and adsorption onto metal oxide electrodes (especially titania and zinc oxide) are discussed. Eventually, the key areas of necessary improvements are identified and assessed. Full article

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