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Educ. Sci., Volume 2, Issue 1 (March 2012), Pages 1-53

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Research

Open AccessArticle Rethinking the Thinking on Democracy in Education: What Are Educators Thinking (and Doing) About Democracy?
Educ. Sci. 2012, 2(1), 1-21; doi:10.3390/educ2010001
Received: 9 November 2011 / Revised: 7 December 2011 / Accepted: 19 December 2011 / Published: 21 December 2011
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (288 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper examines perspectives and perceptions of democracy of pre- and in-service teachers as well as teacher-education academics in Australia in order to develop a robust and critical democratic education. Using data from an on-line survey the paper presents the quantitative analyses, [...] Read more.
This paper examines perspectives and perceptions of democracy of pre- and in-service teachers as well as teacher-education academics in Australia in order to develop a robust and critical democratic education. Using data from an on-line survey the paper presents the quantitative analyses, and the qualitative responses of contrasting understandings of democracy, citizenship and the role of education in the promotion and development of an active and thick democracy the paper critiques the neo-liberal (thin) democratic discourse of contemporary Australian academic research that suggests that the Civics and Citizenship Education project only requires some augmentation highlighting issues like sustainability and globalization while ignoring social justice issues. It begins by outlining the concepts of thick and thin democracy, and revisits the state of civics and citizenship education (CCE) in Australia. It is argued that while the pre-service teachers in this study may have a more critical and thicker understanding of democracy that is mirrored in the views of their teacher-education professors, the practicing teachers, on the other hand, have largely adopted the mainstream neo-liberal discourse, presenting a tendency to view democracy in a very narrow or thin way that may impact on their classroom practice. The paper concludes with recommendations related to what a thick democracy might actually look like in school education. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Civics and Citizenship in Its Global Context)
Open AccessArticle AI and Mathematical Education
Educ. Sci. 2012, 2(1), 22-32; doi:10.3390/educ2010022
Received: 23 November 2011 / Revised: 19 December 2011 / Accepted: 23 December 2011 / Published: 6 January 2012
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (222 KB) | XML Full-text
Abstract
From ancient times, the history of human beings has developed by a succession of steps and sometimes jumps, until reaching the relative sophistication of the modern brain and culture. Researchers are attempting to create systems that mimic human thinking, understand speech, or [...] Read more.
From ancient times, the history of human beings has developed by a succession of steps and sometimes jumps, until reaching the relative sophistication of the modern brain and culture. Researchers are attempting to create systems that mimic human thinking, understand speech, or beat the best human chess player. Understanding the mechanisms of intelligence, and creating intelligent artifacts are the twin goals of Artificial Intelligence (AI). Great mathematical minds have played a key role in AI in recent years; to name only a few: Janos Neumann (also known as John von Neumann), Konrad Zuse, Norbert Wiener, Claude E. Shannon, Alan M. Turing, Grigore Moisil, Lofti A. Zadeh, Ronald R. Yager, Michio Sugeno, Solomon Marcus, or Lászlo A. Barabási. Introducing the study of AI is not merely useful because of its capability for solving difficult problems, but also because of its mathematical nature. It prepares us to understand the current world, enabling us to act on the challenges of the future. Full article
Open AccessArticle Women, Educational Leadership and Societal Culture
Educ. Sci. 2012, 2(1), 33-44; doi:10.3390/educ2010033
Received: 10 January 2012 / Revised: 7 February 2012 / Accepted: 15 February 2012 / Published: 2 March 2012
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Abstract
This paper argues that women’s participation in the public and their access to senior leadership positions is defined by cultural and belief systems in a society. It draws upon a study of Women College heads of women-only colleges, in a region in [...] Read more.
This paper argues that women’s participation in the public and their access to senior leadership positions is defined by cultural and belief systems in a society. It draws upon a study of Women College heads of women-only colleges, in a region in Pakistan, to unveil the discursive dynamics in that societal context where complex factors interact to determine what is acceptable in that culture. This has implications for women’ roles and determines their practices as college heads. The study also unveiled the culturally-informed strategies adopted by these women professionals to exercise their role as college heads in the presence of multiple cultural constraints. Full article
Open AccessArticle Digital Divide: How Do Home Internet Access and Parental Support Affect Student Outcomes?
Educ. Sci. 2012, 2(1), 45-53; doi:10.3390/educ2010045
Received: 9 January 2012 / Revised: 19 February 2012 / Accepted: 22 February 2012 / Published: 5 March 2012
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (198 KB) | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study examined the relationship between home Internet access/parental support and student outcomes. Survey data were collected from 1,576 middle school students in China. Data were analyzed using descriptive analysis, independent-samples T-test, and regression analysis. Results indicate that students who had home [...] Read more.
This study examined the relationship between home Internet access/parental support and student outcomes. Survey data were collected from 1,576 middle school students in China. Data were analyzed using descriptive analysis, independent-samples T-test, and regression analysis. Results indicate that students who had home Internet access reported higher scores than those without home Internet on all three dimensions: Computer and Internet self-efficacy, Attitudes towards technology and Developmental outcomes. Home Internet access and parental support were significantly positively associated with technology self-efficacy, interest in technology, perceived importance of the Internet, and perceived impact of the Internet on learning. Findings from this study have significant implications for research and practice on how to narrow down the digital divide. Full article

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