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Educ. Sci., Volume 3, Issue 4 (December 2013), Pages 359-420

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Research

Open AccessArticle Adopting Mobile Learning in Tertiary Environments: Instructional, Curricular and Organizational Matters
Educ. Sci. 2013, 3(4), 359-374; doi:10.3390/educsci3040359
Received: 2 July 2013 / Revised: 13 September 2013 / Accepted: 16 September 2013 / Published: 27 September 2013
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (323 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This qualitative study looked at the instructional, curricular and organizational factors impacting on the adoption of mobile learning in a higher education institution. Academics expressed their views on a variety of educational issues likely to enhance or hinder the effectiveness of the [...] Read more.
This qualitative study looked at the instructional, curricular and organizational factors impacting on the adoption of mobile learning in a higher education institution. Academics expressed their views on a variety of educational issues likely to enhance or hinder the effectiveness of the innovation. Teachers requested more professional development in a number of key areas including the integration of the technology into teaching and learning. Likewise, resolving vital issues such as workload, equity to access and effective policy making were seen as key to successful adoption. Technical issues such as having good wireless connectivity, need for efficient technical support, access to mobile devices and an understanding of their operational limitations with respect to desk/laptops were also highlighted. The study revealed a number of alternative perceptions and misconceptions, about articulating effective mobile learning pedagogies. For instance, staff expressed concerns about the risk of exposing students to superficial learning when mobile learning experiences were not well designed, the prospect that the devices might distract students from learning, as well as a possible deterioration of the quality of interaction between academics and students. Recommendations to reconcile those alternative conceptions with best practice principles are outlined. Full article
Open AccessArticle The Impact of Seating Location and Seating Type on Student Performance
Educ. Sci. 2013, 3(4), 375-386; doi:10.3390/educsci3040375
Received: 17 June 2013 / Revised: 29 September 2013 / Accepted: 8 October 2013 / Published: 15 October 2013
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (333 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
While an extensive body of research exists regarding the delivery of course knowledge and material, much less attention has been paid to the performance effect of seating position within a classroom. Research findings are mixed as to whether students in the front [...] Read more.
While an extensive body of research exists regarding the delivery of course knowledge and material, much less attention has been paid to the performance effect of seating position within a classroom. Research findings are mixed as to whether students in the front row of a classroom outperform students in the back row. Another issue that has not been fully examined in higher education is the effect of environmental factors, specifically seating type, on student performance. This study examines the impact of both factors—seating location and seating type—on overall performance. Data were collected over a 10-year period from 1,138 undergraduate senior business students during their capstone course. The findings suggest that student performance is not significantly altered by seating location or seating type. Full article
Open AccessArticle An Educational Resource on Water and Health as a Teaching Aid in French Primary Schools—Part II: Design and Validation
Educ. Sci. 2013, 3(4), 387-402; doi:10.3390/educsci3040387
Received: 25 August 2013 / Revised: 21 October 2013 / Accepted: 23 October 2013 / Published: 1 November 2013
PDF Full-text (587 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
An educational resource on water and health, using an approach focused on health education and environmental health education, was developed to help teachers in the classroom. The implementation of health education programs in French primary schools is explained. Three specific objectives were [...] Read more.
An educational resource on water and health, using an approach focused on health education and environmental health education, was developed to help teachers in the classroom. The implementation of health education programs in French primary schools is explained. Three specific objectives were identified, targeting 3rd, 4th, and 5th year pupils: water as a body constituent, water as a nutrient element, and water as a factor in hygiene, and their individual contribution to good health. The project was led by academics in close collaboration with education and health professionals (school nurses, public health engineers), and people working in health promotion organizations and environmental associations. The method used for the design and validation of the resource was adapted to the educational objective. The “Water and Health” educational resource is structured in 25 modules and includes 89 work files. It was validated in the classroom and includes an assessment of the teaching material and the pupils’ results. The resource has been published in French by the Regional Teachers’ Resource Centre (CRDP Auvergne, France) and is distributed by the National Teachers’ Resource Network (Sceren). Full article
Open AccessArticle What about Global History? Dilemmas in the Selection of Content in the School Subject History
Educ. Sci. 2013, 3(4), 403-420; doi:10.3390/educsci3040403
Received: 20 July 2013 / Revised: 9 September 2013 / Accepted: 16 October 2013 / Published: 15 November 2013
PDF Full-text (325 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
It is a cliché, but also a fundamental fact that we live in a world where globalization and international challenges, opportunities and relationships play an increasing role. However, how have these changing conditions affected the content of school history? To what degree [...] Read more.
It is a cliché, but also a fundamental fact that we live in a world where globalization and international challenges, opportunities and relationships play an increasing role. However, how have these changing conditions affected the content of school history? To what degree have curricula and textbooks addressed these challenges? Is the main focus in school history still on the history of the nation state, or has it successfully integrated topics and themes from world history? These are questions I discuss in this paper. In the main, my starting point is the situation in Denmark, but with perspectives and comparisons from Norway, England and Germany. Among other things, I will put school history in a historical context, because the subject’s history and genesis—in my opinion—tends to maintain a traditional content and form of organization, thereby reducing the subject’s usefulness. At the end of the paper, I outline and discuss a few alternative options for selecting and organizing the content with the aim of being more inclusive with regard to global and international aspects. The paper must be understood as a step towards the clarification of a development project that aims to propose and experiment with practices for the selection and organization of the content of the history curriculum, with the aim of increasing the international and global dimensions in history teaching. Full article

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