Next Issue
Previous Issue

Table of Contents

Educ. Sci., Volume 4, Issue 1 (March 2014), Pages 1-171

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-11
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research

Open AccessEditorial Acknowledgement to Reviewers of Education Sciences in 2013
Educ. Sci. 2014, 4(1), 139-140; doi:10.3390/educsci4010139
Received: 12 March 2014 / Accepted: 12 March 2014 / Published: 12 March 2014
PDF Full-text (99 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract The editors of Education Sciences would like to express their sincere gratitude to the following reviewers for assessing manuscripts in 2013: [...] Full article

Research

Jump to: Editorial

Open AccessArticle Validation of a Pre- and Post-Evaluation Process: A Tool for Adult Training in Food Handling
Educ. Sci. 2014, 4(1), 1-12; doi:10.3390/educsci4010001
Received: 29 October 2013 / Revised: 3 December 2013 / Accepted: 9 December 2013 / Published: 27 December 2013
PDF Full-text (328 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Education in food safety is a well-recognized health intervention, which allows the prevention of a wide range of diseases. Among the strategies of control and prevention of foodborne diseases, it is indicated that food safety education has the double advantage of having [...] Read more.
Education in food safety is a well-recognized health intervention, which allows the prevention of a wide range of diseases. Among the strategies of control and prevention of foodborne diseases, it is indicated that food safety education has the double advantage of having low costs and high potential effectiveness, as long as it is carried out with the active participation of food handling workers. In many countries, the Food Code has made compulsory the sanitary training of food workers. However, like in many other disciplines, food science educators receive minimal training on instructional techniques before becoming teachers. One of the important questions of the problem here presented is the issue related to the methodologies of pre-evaluation and final evaluation. We describe two indices to validate the training in food safety, which could be used for the quantification of educational intervention. The results show that a better learning process involves the active participation of both the students and the educators. We concluded that the evaluation process is more complex than the single instance of accreditation though a final evaluation. Full article
Open AccessArticle Cultivating Reflective Practitioners in Technology Preparation: Constructing TPACK through Reflection
Educ. Sci. 2014, 4(1), 13-35; doi:10.3390/educsci4010013
Received: 19 September 2013 / Revised: 3 December 2013 / Accepted: 9 December 2013 / Published: 27 December 2013
PDF Full-text (292 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Teaching is a complex profession, which is further complicated by the integration of technology into classrooms. Reflection can help teachers unpack the complexity in their practice. Reflection can be an effective instructional strategy in helping preservice teachers develop technological pedagogical content knowledge [...] Read more.
Teaching is a complex profession, which is further complicated by the integration of technology into classrooms. Reflection can help teachers unpack the complexity in their practice. Reflection can be an effective instructional strategy in helping preservice teachers develop technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK), the complex and dynamic knowledge necessary for effective technology integration into instruction. In this study, reflective activities were integrated into a Learning By Design (LBD) environment, which was created to help preservice teachers develop TPACK. This paper investigated the participants’ TPACK development and examined how reflection helped them construct TPACK. Through content analysis of the participants’ reflective journals, the researcher found that the preservice teachers developed initial TPACK awareness. However, their reflection in technology knowledge and the content aspects of TPACK were limited and superficial. Interviews with the participants showed reflection helped the preservice teachers remember what they learned by describing and elaborating on their in-class experiences, pushed them to think about how to apply what they learned in their future classrooms, and helped them become more reflective and open-minded about using technology in classrooms. Finally, the researcher discussed this study’s implications for teacher educators and researchers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Critical Issues in Educational Technology)
Open AccessArticle Technologies, Democracy and Digital Citizenship: Examining Australian Policy Intersections and the Implications for School Leadership
Educ. Sci. 2014, 4(1), 36-51; doi:10.3390/educsci4010036
Received: 14 October 2013 / Revised: 9 December 2013 / Accepted: 12 December 2013 / Published: 9 January 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (242 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
There are intersections that can occur between the respective peak Australian school education policy agendas. These policies include the use of technologies in classrooms to improve teaching and learning as promoted through the Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians and [...] Read more.
There are intersections that can occur between the respective peak Australian school education policy agendas. These policies include the use of technologies in classrooms to improve teaching and learning as promoted through the Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians and the Australian Curriculum; and the implementation of professional standards as outlined in the Australian Professional Standard for Principals and the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers. These policies create expectations of school leaders to bring about change in classrooms and across their schools, often described as bringing about ‘quality teaching’ and ‘school improvement’. These policies indicate that Australian children should develop ‘democratic values’, and that school principals should exercise ‘democratic values’ in their schools. The national approaches to the implementation of these policies however, is largely silent on promoting learning that fosters democracy through education, or about making connections between teaching and learning with technologies, school leadership and living in a democracy. Yet the policies promote these connections and alignments. Furthermore, understanding democratic values, knowing what is a democracy, and being able to use technologies in democratic ways, has to be learned and practiced. Through the lens of the use of technologies to build digital citizenship and to achieve democratic processes and outcomes in schools, these policy complexities are examined in order to consider some of the implications for school leadership. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue eLearning: Exploring Digital Futures in the 21st Century)
Open AccessArticle Transforming Future Teaching through ‘Carpe Diem’ Learning Design
Educ. Sci. 2014, 4(1), 52-63; doi:10.3390/educsci4010052
Received: 4 November 2013 / Revised: 22 November 2013 / Accepted: 27 December 2013 / Published: 27 January 2014
Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (310 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Academic staff in Higher Education (HE) need to transform their teaching practices to support more future-orientated, digital, student-centered learning. Promoting, enabling and implementing these changes urgently requires acceptable, meaningful and effective staff development for academics. We identify four key areas that are [...] Read more.
Academic staff in Higher Education (HE) need to transform their teaching practices to support more future-orientated, digital, student-centered learning. Promoting, enabling and implementing these changes urgently requires acceptable, meaningful and effective staff development for academics. We identify four key areas that are presenting as barriers to the implementation of successful staff development. We illuminate the Carpe Diem learning design workshop process and illustrate its impact on academic staff as a viable, constructive alternative to traditional staff development processes. The Carpe Diem model directly exposes and addresses the irony that educational institutions expect their academic staff to learn to design and deliver personalized, mobile and technology-enhanced learning to students, whilst wedded to ‘one size fits all’ face-to-face interventions…or worse, ‘page turning’ e-learning that masquerades as staff development. To avoid further frustrations and expensive, inappropriate initiatives, the spirit and practice of Carpe Diem could act as a ‘pathfinder beacon’, and be more widely adopted to enable fast, effective and fully embedded, learner-ready, future-proofed learning. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue eLearning: Exploring Digital Futures in the 21st Century)
Open AccessArticle Leadership and Reshaping Schooling in a Networked World
Educ. Sci. 2014, 4(1), 64-86; doi:10.3390/educsci4010064
Received: 4 October 2013 / Accepted: 22 January 2014 / Published: 17 February 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (566 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper is initiated from a position that, until recently, the nature of schooling globally has remained largely unchanged since its design in the last century, and there has been a hegemony that supported its form to be enduring and largely unchanged. [...] Read more.
This paper is initiated from a position that, until recently, the nature of schooling globally has remained largely unchanged since its design in the last century, and there has been a hegemony that supported its form to be enduring and largely unchanged. However, in a digital, networked world, there is a need to rethink and redefine schooling. Following an examination of schooling in the 21st Century, summarising the context and critical challenges presented by new and emerging digital technologies, suggestions about what schooling might look like in an increasingly digital, networked world are presented. Guidance is provided in relation to key questions for leadership to reshape schooling in a networked world, including: -    how might schools move into the networked mode? -    what is required to lead and manage a networked school community? -    how will a networked school become defined less by its physical space and timetabled lessons, but by being networked and that learning can take place anywhere, anytime? Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue eLearning: Exploring Digital Futures in the 21st Century)
Open AccessArticle Digital Tools Disrupting Tertiary Students’ Notions of Disciplinary Knowledge: Cases in History and Tourism
Educ. Sci. 2014, 4(1), 87-107; doi:10.3390/educsci4010087
Received: 27 October 2013 / Accepted: 5 February 2014 / Published: 20 February 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (491 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper reports on the findings from a two year research project that explored the potential of digital tools in support of teaching–learning across different disciplinary areas at a New Zealand university. Two courses (in History and Tourism) are case studied using [...] Read more.
This paper reports on the findings from a two year research project that explored the potential of digital tools in support of teaching–learning across different disciplinary areas at a New Zealand university. Two courses (in History and Tourism) are case studied using data collected through interviews with lecturers, tutors and their students, and an online student survey. Findings from the research revealed that both lecturers and students were challenged in learning about the affordances and use of the lecturer selected digital tools as a mediational means. The tools were not initially transparent to them, nor were they able to be easily deployed to undertake their primary task—teaching for the lecturers, and, learning and demonstrating learning for the students completing assigned tasks. The process of learning and using the tools disrupted participants’ prior thinking and led to new understandings of both disciplines and of effective pedagogies for the two disciplines. The findings increase our understanding of the ways digital tools can develop, challenge and expand tertiary students learning and have implications for practice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue eLearning: Exploring Digital Futures in the 21st Century)
Open AccessArticle eLearning and eMaking: 3D Printing Blurring the Digital and the Physical
Educ. Sci. 2014, 4(1), 108-121; doi:10.3390/educsci4010108
Received: 30 October 2013 / Accepted: 22 January 2014 / Published: 24 February 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (454 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This article considers the potential of 3D printing as an eLearning tool for design education and the role of eMaking in bringing together the virtual and the physical in the design studio. eLearning has matured from the basics of lecture capture into [...] Read more.
This article considers the potential of 3D printing as an eLearning tool for design education and the role of eMaking in bringing together the virtual and the physical in the design studio. eLearning has matured from the basics of lecture capture into sophisticated, interactive learning activities for students. At the same time, laptops and internet enabled phones have made computer-based learning mobile, invading classroom learning, changing communication between students, enabling on the spot research, and making the recording of ideas and activities easier. The barriers between online and offline are becoming blurred in a combined digital and physical learning environment. Three-dimensional printing is part of this unification and can be an empowering learning tool for students, changing their relationship with the virtual and the physical, allowing them to take ideas and thinking from screen to reality and back again in an iterative, connected process, however, from an eLearning point of view it is, more importantly, a transformative technology with the potential to change the relationship of the learner to their learning and the scope and nature of their work. Examples from Griffith Product Design student learning illustrate the potential of eMaking to enhance combined learning in a digital age. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue eLearning: Exploring Digital Futures in the 21st Century)
Open AccessArticle Elementary Science Instruction: Examining a Virtual Environment for Evidence of Learning, Engagement, and 21st Century Competencies
Educ. Sci. 2014, 4(1), 122-138; doi:10.3390/educsci4010122
Received: 31 December 2013 / Revised: 14 February 2014 / Accepted: 20 February 2014 / Published: 6 March 2014
PDF Full-text (621 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This mixed methods study examined the effectiveness of a virtual world curriculum for teaching elementary students complex science concepts and skills. Data were collected using pre- and post-content tests and a student survey of engaged learning, An additional survey collected teacher observations [...] Read more.
This mixed methods study examined the effectiveness of a virtual world curriculum for teaching elementary students complex science concepts and skills. Data were collected using pre- and post-content tests and a student survey of engaged learning, An additional survey collected teacher observations of 21st century competencies conducive to learning. The study involved a five-day intervention of fifteen 4th grade students in a small Midwestern school using a virtual science computer game from Arizona State University. Thirty elementary teachers from Australia, England, and the United States were surveyed on classroom observations of their elementary students working in the virtual world environment. Research questions guiding the virtual learning study were: (1) do pre- and post-content tests show significant learning in the virtual environment; (2) are students academically engaged during the learning process; and (3) are students actively demonstrating relevant 21st century competencies. The study supports prior research in game-based learning showing measureable learning results, highly engaged, motivated students, and observations of student behaviors conducive to learning science in school, namely collaboration, problem solving, critical thinking/inquiry, global awareness, and technology use. Full article
Open AccessArticle Evaluation of the Educational Impact of Participation Time in a Small Spacecraft Development Program
Educ. Sci. 2014, 4(1), 141-154; doi:10.3390/educsci4010141
Received: 30 December 2013 / Revised: 17 February 2014 / Accepted: 26 February 2014 / Published: 18 March 2014
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (194 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The value of the duration of participation in a small spacecraft program has not previously been sufficiently characterized. This work seeks to determine whether most relevant benefits are received by participants quickly (suggesting that participant education would be best achieved by shorter [...] Read more.
The value of the duration of participation in a small spacecraft program has not previously been sufficiently characterized. This work seeks to determine whether most relevant benefits are received by participants quickly (suggesting that participant education would be best achieved by shorter duration exposure to multiple domains) or accrues over time (suggesting that prolonged work on a single project would be most beneficial). The experiences of the student participants in the OpenOrbiter Small Spacecraft Development Initiative at the University of North Dakota are analyzed in an attempt to answer this question. To this end, correlation between the duration of program participation and the level of benefit received (across five categories) is assessed herein. Full article
Open AccessArticle Mapping the Evolution of eLearning from 1977–2005 to Inform Understandings of eLearning Historical Trends
Educ. Sci. 2014, 4(1), 155-171; doi:10.3390/educsci4010155
Received: 4 October 2013 / Accepted: 11 March 2014 / Published: 19 March 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (528 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
While there have been very limited studies of the educational computing literature to analyze the research trends since the early emergence of educational computing technologies, the authors argue that it is important for both researchers and educators to understand the major, historical [...] Read more.
While there have been very limited studies of the educational computing literature to analyze the research trends since the early emergence of educational computing technologies, the authors argue that it is important for both researchers and educators to understand the major, historical educational computing trends in order to inform understandings of current and future eLearning trends. This study provides the findings of an analysis of 2,694 journal articles published between 1977 and 2005 in four major, international educational computing journals. It provides the platform for a subsequent analysis for the period 2006–2014 and beyond, as future educational computing research is published. The journal articles analyzed were categorized according to their research themes. Subsequently, clustering analysis, multi-dimension scale analysis, and research diversity analysis were performed on the categorized results to explore the research trends. The research literature analysis confirmed that there were identifiable evolutionary trends dating from 1977, and, importantly, the analysis highlighted that each key breakthrough in technology was accompanied by increased educational research about those technologies to inform educational practices. Importantly, two major driving forces of the historical trends identified were technologies and pedagogical approaches. The paper concludes with explanations of how these trends from 1977–2005 have shaped the current focus on Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) needed for effective current and future eLearning. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue eLearning: Exploring Digital Futures in the 21st Century)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Education Sciences Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
education@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Education Sciences
Back to Top