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Educ. Sci., Volume 4, Issue 2 (June 2014), Pages 172-208

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Research

Open AccessArticle "E-tivities from the Front Line”: A Community of Inquiry Case Study Analysis of Educators’ Blog Posts on the Topic of Designing and Delivering Online Learning
Educ. Sci. 2014, 4(2), 172-192; doi:10.3390/educsci4020172
Received: 5 February 2014 / Accepted: 7 April 2014 / Published: 22 April 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (848 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Designing and implementing successful online learning has been at the forefront of institutional agendas since digital learning increased in market demand over the last decade. However there is still ongoing debate as to the “how” of this arduous task. The Community of [...] Read more.
Designing and implementing successful online learning has been at the forefront of institutional agendas since digital learning increased in market demand over the last decade. However there is still ongoing debate as to the “how” of this arduous task. The Community of Inquiry (CoI) is one learning design method that has seen potential in the field, but practical implementation of designing for the important components of Social, Cognitive and Teaching Presence have yet to be fully realised. This paper researches an e-learning design strategy called E-tivities as a suggested possible method for designing for CoI components. The research explored recent online blog posts of experienced learning designers’ and educators’ experience in designing successful online learning using E-tivities. Results suggest the E-tivities do have the potential to cater for all Presences of CoI. Specifically when using E-tivities to design online learning Affective Expression was the highest reported Social Presence design factor. All four components of Cognitive Presence appeared to be present in E-tivities design. The most important component for adequate Teaching Presence factors was the initial Design and Organisation of the course. E-tivities and the 5-Stage Model provides a solid framework for this to occur. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue eLearning: Exploring Digital Futures in the 21st Century)
Open AccessArticle The Effects of Facilitating Feedback on Online Learners’ Cognitive Engagement: Evidence from the Asynchronous Online Discussion
Educ. Sci. 2014, 4(2), 193-208; doi:10.3390/educsci4020193
Received: 13 December 2013 / Revised: 23 April 2014 / Accepted: 29 April 2014 / Published: 22 May 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (9523 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
With a large-scale online K-12 teacher professional development course as the research context, this study examined the effects of facilitating feedback on online learners’ cognitive engagement using quasi-experiment method. A total of 1,540 discussion messages from 110 learners (65 in the experimental [...] Read more.
With a large-scale online K-12 teacher professional development course as the research context, this study examined the effects of facilitating feedback on online learners’ cognitive engagement using quasi-experiment method. A total of 1,540 discussion messages from 110 learners (65 in the experimental group and 45 in the control group) were both quantitatively and qualitatively analyzed. Results revealed that facilitating feedback significantly impacted learners’ cognitive engagement: (1) the level of cognitive engagement presented in treatment group was significantly higher than that of control group; (2) cognitive engagement levels of original postings increased overtime in the treatment group, while decreased in the control group; (3) the difference in discussion quantities between two groups was not significant. Effective feedback strategies and the importance of facilitating feedback in creating quality online instruction were discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Critical Issues in Educational Technology)

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