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Healthcare, Volume 5, Issue 2 (June 2017)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Disability and Psychiatric Symptoms in Men Referred for Treatment with Work-Related Problems to Primary Mental Health Care
Healthcare 2017, 5(2), 18; doi:10.3390/healthcare5020018
Received: 17 November 2016 / Revised: 7 March 2017 / Accepted: 22 March 2017 / Published: 24 March 2017
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Abstract
The relationship between male sex and employment as barriers to accessing mental health care is unclear. The aim of this research was to examine (1) whether the clinical features of men referred to a shared mental health care (SMHC) service through primary care
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The relationship between male sex and employment as barriers to accessing mental health care is unclear. The aim of this research was to examine (1) whether the clinical features of men referred to a shared mental health care (SMHC) service through primary care differed when symptoms were affecting them in the work domain; and (2) empirically re-evaluate the effectiveness of a SMHC model for work-related disability using a pre-post chart review of N = 3960 referrals to SMHC. ANOVA and logistic regression were performed to examine symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire, PHQ) and disability (World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule, WHODAS 2) at entry and discharge. Men were RR (relative risk) = 1.8 (95% C.I.: 1.60–2.05) times more likely to be referred to SMHC with work problems than women. Having greater disability and more severe somatic symptoms increased the likelihood of a work-related referral. There were no significant differences after treatment. Problems in the work domain may play an important role in men’s treatment seeking and clinicians’ recognition of a mental health care need. This study is relevant because men are underrepresented in mental health (MH) treatment and primary care is the main gateway to accessing MH care. Asking men about functioning in the work domain may increase access to helpful psychiatric services. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Hand Motion Detection in fNIRS Neuroimaging Data
Healthcare 2017, 5(2), 20; doi:10.3390/healthcare5020020
Received: 15 December 2016 / Revised: 7 April 2017 / Accepted: 11 April 2017 / Published: 15 April 2017
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Abstract
As the number of people diagnosed with movement disorders is increasing, it becomes vital to design techniques that allow the better understanding of human brain in naturalistic settings. There are many brain imaging methods such as fMRI, SPECT, and MEG that provide the
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As the number of people diagnosed with movement disorders is increasing, it becomes vital to design techniques that allow the better understanding of human brain in naturalistic settings. There are many brain imaging methods such as fMRI, SPECT, and MEG that provide the functional information of the brain. However, these techniques have some limitations including immobility, cost, and motion artifacts. One of the most emerging portable brain scanners available today is functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). In this study, we have conducted fNIRS neuroimaging of seven healthy subjects while they were performing wrist tasks such as flipping their hand with the periods of rest (no movement). Different models of support vector machine is applied to these fNIRS neuroimaging data and the results show that we could classify the action and rest periods with the accuracy of over 80% for the fNIRS data of individual participants. Our results are promising and suggest that the presented classification method for fNIRS could further be applied to real-time applications such as brain computer interfacing (BCI), and into the future steps of this research to record brain activity from fNIRS and EEG, and fuse them with the body motion sensors to correlate the activities. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Reliability and Validity of the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-12 Version 2 (SF-12v2) in Adults with Non-Cancer Pain
Healthcare 2017, 5(2), 22; doi:10.3390/healthcare5020022
Received: 17 January 2017 / Revised: 20 April 2017 / Accepted: 23 April 2017 / Published: 26 April 2017
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Abstract
Limited evidence exists on how non-cancer pain (NCP) affects an individual’s health-related quality of life (HRQoL). This study aimed to validate the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-12 Version 2 (SF-12v2), a generic measure of HRQoL, in a NCP cohort using the Medical Expenditure
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Limited evidence exists on how non-cancer pain (NCP) affects an individual’s health-related quality of life (HRQoL). This study aimed to validate the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-12 Version 2 (SF-12v2), a generic measure of HRQoL, in a NCP cohort using the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Longitudinal Files. The SF Mental Component Summary (MCS12) and SF Physical Component Summary (PCS12) were tested for reliability (internal consistency and test-retest reliability) and validity (construct: convergent and discriminant; criterion: concurrent and predictive). A total of 15,716 patients with NCP were included in the final analysis. The MCS12 and PCS12 demonstrated high internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha and Mosier’s alpha > 0.8), and moderate and high test-retest reliability, respectively (MCS12 intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC): 0.64; PCS12 ICC: 0.73). Both scales were significantly associated with a number of chronic conditions (p < 0.05). The PCS12 was strongly correlated with perceived health (r = 0.52) but weakly correlated with perceived mental health (r = 0.25). The MCS12 was moderately correlated with perceived mental health (r = 0.42) and perceived health (r = 0.33). Increasing PCS12 and MCS12 scores were significantly associated with lower odds of reporting future physical and cognitive limitations (PCS12: OR = 0.90 95%CI: 0.89–0.90, MCS12: OR = 0.94 95%CI: 0.93–0.94). In summary, the SF-12v2 is a reliable and valid measure of HRQoL for patients with NCP. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Inpatients with Psychosis (the REACH Study): Protocol for Treatment Development and Pilot Testing
Healthcare 2017, 5(2), 23; doi:10.3390/healthcare5020023
Received: 17 March 2017 / Revised: 31 March 2017 / Accepted: 3 May 2017 / Published: 5 May 2017
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Abstract
Patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders frequently require treatment at inpatient hospitals during periods of acute illness for crisis management and stabilization. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), a “third wave” cognitive-behavioral intervention that employs innovative mindfulness-based strategies, has shown initial efficacy in randomized controlled trials
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Patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders frequently require treatment at inpatient hospitals during periods of acute illness for crisis management and stabilization. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), a “third wave” cognitive-behavioral intervention that employs innovative mindfulness-based strategies, has shown initial efficacy in randomized controlled trials for improving acute and post-discharge outcomes in patients with psychosis when studied in acute-care psychiatric hospitals in the U.S. However, the intervention has not been widely adopted in its current form because of its use of an individual-only format and delivery by doctoral-level research therapists with extensive prior experience using ACT. The aim of the Researching the Effectiveness of Acceptance-based Coping during Hospitalization (REACH) Study is to adapt a promising acute-care psychosocial treatment for inpatients with psychosis, and to pilot test its effectiveness in a routine inpatient setting. More specifically, we describe our plans to: (a) further develop and refine the treatment and training protocols, (b) conduct an open trial and make further modifications based on the experience gained, and (c) conduct a pilot randomized controlled trial in preparation for a future fully-powered clinical trial testing the effectiveness of ACT. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Microbiota and Particulate Matter Assessment in Portuguese Optical Shops Providing Contact Lens Services
Healthcare 2017, 5(2), 24; doi:10.3390/healthcare5020024
Received: 18 March 2017 / Revised: 3 May 2017 / Accepted: 9 May 2017 / Published: 15 May 2017
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Abstract
The aim of this work was to assess the microbiota (fungi and bacteria) and particulate matter in optical shops, contributing to a specific protocol to ensure a proper assessment. Air samples were collected through an impaction method. Surface and equipment swab samples were
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The aim of this work was to assess the microbiota (fungi and bacteria) and particulate matter in optical shops, contributing to a specific protocol to ensure a proper assessment. Air samples were collected through an impaction method. Surface and equipment swab samples were also collected side-by-side. Measurements of particulate matter were performed using portable direct-reading equipment. A walkthrough survey and checklist was also applied in each shop. Regarding air sampling, eight of the 13 shops analysed were above the legal requirement and 10 from the 26 surfaces samples were overloaded. In three out of the 13 shops fungal contamination in the analysed equipment was not detected. The bacteria air load was above the threshold in one of the 13 analysed shops. However, bacterial counts were detected in all sampled equipment. Fungi and bacteria air load suggested to be influencing all of the other surface and equipment samples. These results reinforce the need to improve air quality, not only to comply with the legal requirements, but also to ensure proper hygienic conditions. Public health intervention is needed to assure the quality and safety of the rooms and equipment in optical shops that perform health interventions in patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health Issues in the New Millennium)
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Open AccessArticle The Role of Affect and Cognition in Processing Messages about Early Diagnosis for Alzheimer’s Disease by Older People
Healthcare 2017, 5(2), 27; doi:10.3390/healthcare5020027
Received: 14 April 2017 / Revised: 5 June 2017 / Accepted: 7 June 2017 / Published: 12 June 2017
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Abstract
Through early diagnosis of symptoms, the Alzheimer’s disease process can be decelerated. The main concern is to encourage the population at risk to take responsible actions at the earliest stage of the onset of the disease. Persuasive communication is essential to achieve this.
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Through early diagnosis of symptoms, the Alzheimer’s disease process can be decelerated. The main concern is to encourage the population at risk to take responsible actions at the earliest stage of the onset of the disease. Persuasive communication is essential to achieve this. In an experimental study, the evaluation of awareness messages for early diagnosis containing weak and strong arguments and negative and positive images was performed on a sample of older Belgians. The mediating role of affective responses and message thoughts was explored. Strong arguments led to a more positive evaluation of the message than weak arguments directly and indirectly via the positive effect they had on message affect and thoughts, which, in turn, positively affected message evaluation. A negative message image led to a more positive message evaluation than a positive one. This effect was not mediated by either message affect or message thoughts. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Population Characteristics in a Tertiary Pain Service Cohort Experiencing Chronic Non-Cancer Pain: Weight Status, Comorbidities, and Patient Goals
Healthcare 2017, 5(2), 28; doi:10.3390/healthcare5020028
Received: 20 March 2017 / Revised: 29 May 2017 / Accepted: 7 June 2017 / Published: 14 June 2017
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Abstract
We describe the characteristics of patients attending an Australian tertiary multidisciplinary pain service and identify areas for nutrition interventions. This cross-sectional study targets patients experiencing chronic pain who attended the service between June–December 2014. Self-reported data was captured from: (1) an Electronic Persistent
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We describe the characteristics of patients attending an Australian tertiary multidisciplinary pain service and identify areas for nutrition interventions. This cross-sectional study targets patients experiencing chronic pain who attended the service between June–December 2014. Self-reported data was captured from: (1) an Electronic Persistent Pain Outcomes Collaboration (ePPOC) referral questionnaire, incorporating demographics, pain status, and mental health; (2) a Pain Assessment and Recovery Plan (PARP), which documents patients’ perceived problems associated with pain and personal treatment goals. The ePPOC referral questionnaire was completed by 166 patients and the PARP by 153. The mean (SD) patient age was 53 ± 13 years, with almost 60% experiencing pain for >5 years. Forty-five percent of patients were classified as obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2, mean (SD) BMI was 31 ± 7 kg/m2), with a mean waist circumference of 104 ± 19.4 cm (SD). The most frequent patient nominated treatment goals related to physical activity (39%), followed by nutritional goals (23%). Traditionally, pain management programs have included physical, psychosocial, and medical, but not nutritional, interventions. By contrast, patients identified and reported important nutrition-related treatment goals. There is a need to test nutrition treatment pathways, including an evaluation of dietary intake and nutrition support. This will help to optimize dietary behaviors and establish nutrition as an important component of multidisciplinary chronic pain management. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview Healthcare Engagement as a Potential Source of Psychological Distress among People without Religious Beliefs: A Systematic Review
Healthcare 2017, 5(2), 19; doi:10.3390/healthcare5020019
Received: 9 March 2017 / Revised: 21 March 2017 / Accepted: 24 March 2017 / Published: 5 April 2017
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Abstract
Research into religion and mental health is increasing, but nonbelievers in terms of religion are often overlooked. Research has shown that nonbelievers experience various forms of psychological distress and that the negative perception of nonbelievers by others is a potential source of distress.
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Research into religion and mental health is increasing, but nonbelievers in terms of religion are often overlooked. Research has shown that nonbelievers experience various forms of psychological distress and that the negative perception of nonbelievers by others is a potential source of distress. This review builds on that research by identifying another potential source of psychological distress for nonbelievers: engagement with the healthcare system. Poor understanding of nonbelievers by healthcare professionals may lead to impaired communication in the healthcare setting, resulting in distress. Attempts by nonbelievers to avoid distress may result in different patterns of healthcare utilization. Awareness of these concerns may help healthcare providers to minimize distress among their nonbelieving patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Humanities and Healthcare)
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Open AccessReview Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Clinical Manifestations, Dietary Influences, and Management
Healthcare 2017, 5(2), 21; doi:10.3390/healthcare5020021
Received: 23 December 2016 / Revised: 25 March 2017 / Accepted: 18 April 2017 / Published: 26 April 2017
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Abstract
Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder that is characterized by symptoms of chronic abdominal pain and altered bowel habits in the absence of an overtly identifiable cause. It is the most commonly diagnosed functional gastrointestinal disorder, accounting for about one
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Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder that is characterized by symptoms of chronic abdominal pain and altered bowel habits in the absence of an overtly identifiable cause. It is the most commonly diagnosed functional gastrointestinal disorder, accounting for about one third of gastroenterology visits. It generally presents as a complex of symptoms, including psychological dysfunction. Hypersensitivity to certain foods, especially foods that contain high amounts of fructose, plays a role in the pathophysiology of IBS. Elevated consumption of high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) has been discussed in this aspect. The treatment options for IBS are challenging and varied. In addition to dietary restrictions for HFCS-induced IBS, such as low-FODMAP (Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharide, Monosaccharides, and Polyols) diets, existing drug therapies are administered based on the predominant symptoms and IBS-subtype. Patients with IBS are likely to suffer from issues, such as anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic-stress disorder. Biopsychosocial factors particularly socioeconomic status, sex, and race should, thus, be considered for diagnostic evaluation of patients with IBS. Full article
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Open AccessReview Linoleic Acid: A Nutritional Quandary
Healthcare 2017, 5(2), 25; doi:10.3390/healthcare5020025
Received: 3 April 2017 / Revised: 13 May 2017 / Accepted: 18 May 2017 / Published: 20 May 2017
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Abstract
Over the course of the twentieth century, there was a 20-fold increase in consumption of vegetable oils resulting both from their increased availability and from recommendations to consume these oils as an aid to lower blood cholesterol levels. This dietary change markedly increased
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Over the course of the twentieth century, there was a 20-fold increase in consumption of vegetable oils resulting both from their increased availability and from recommendations to consume these oils as an aid to lower blood cholesterol levels. This dietary change markedly increased the consumption of linoleic acid to current levels of approximately 6% of total dietary energy. While considerable research has focused on the effects of dietary linoleic acid on cardiovascular health, questions about optimum dietary levels remain. For example, meta-analyses disagree about the role of dietary linoleic acid in atherosclerosis, and recent publications indicate that linoleic acid’s reduction of blood cholesterol levels does not predict its effect on the development of atherosclerosis. Further, there are also detrimental effects of elevated dietary linoleic acid on human health related to its role in inflammation and its activity as a promoter of cancer in animals. Current data do not allow determination of the level of dietary linoleic acid needed for optimum health. Studies of the effects of a wide range of linoleic acid consumption may help determine dietary recommendations that are optimal for human health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet Quality)
Open AccessReview Breast Cancer: Exploring the Facts and Holistic Needs during and beyond Treatment
Healthcare 2017, 5(2), 26; doi:10.3390/healthcare5020026
Received: 25 January 2017 / Revised: 12 April 2017 / Accepted: 19 April 2017 / Published: 24 May 2017
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Abstract
Breast cancer patients face challenges throughout the journey of diagnosis, treatment, post-treatment, and recovery. The breast cancer patient is exposed to a multidisciplinary team including doctors, nurses, therapists, counselors, and psychologists. While the team assembled together aims to address multiple facets in breast
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Breast cancer patients face challenges throughout the journey of diagnosis, treatment, post-treatment, and recovery. The breast cancer patient is exposed to a multidisciplinary team including doctors, nurses, therapists, counselors, and psychologists. While the team assembled together aims to address multiple facets in breast cancer care, the sub-specialized nature of individual professional practices may constrain the overview of patients’ holistic needs and a comprehensive approach to cancer management. This paper aims to provide an overview of the holistic needs of breast cancer patients at each stage of their cancer journey, addressing their complex physical, psychological, and social needs. As every patient is different, cancer care has to be tailored to each patient based on a holistic needs assessment. This paper also explores how support can be provided from the perspectives of the healthcare providers, family members and caretakers. Examples of general practices at healthcare institutions worldwide as well as supportive care provided by support groups are discussed. The needs of breast cancer patients extend beyond the resolution of cancer as a disease, and the restoration of health as far as possible is a critical component of healing. Understanding the complex issues involved in the journey of breast cancer will aid healthcare providers to be better equipped to sensitively address their concerns and focus on healing the patient holistically. Methodology: This paper provides a literature review of validated practices in different countries and elaborates on the holistic needs of patients at various stages of recovery. This review is based on more than a decade of publications sourced from multiple resources including PubMed journal articles; books and official websites of breast cancer organizations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Holistic Needs of Those Living with and beyond Breast Cancer)
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Open AccessReview Saturated Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Disease: Replacements for Saturated Fat to Reduce Cardiovascular Risk
Healthcare 2017, 5(2), 29; doi:10.3390/healthcare5020029
Received: 15 May 2017 / Revised: 13 June 2017 / Accepted: 16 June 2017 / Published: 21 June 2017
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Abstract
Dietary recommendations to decrease the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) have focused on reducing intake of saturated fatty acids (SFA) for more than 50 years. While the 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans advise substituting both monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids for SFA, evidence
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Dietary recommendations to decrease the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) have focused on reducing intake of saturated fatty acids (SFA) for more than 50 years. While the 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans advise substituting both monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids for SFA, evidence supports other nutrient substitutions that will also reduce CVD risk. For example, replacing SFA with whole grains, but not refined carbohydrates, reduces CVD risk. Replacing SFA with protein, especially plant protein, may also reduce CVD risk. While dairy fat (milk, cheese) is associated with a slightly lower CVD risk compared to meat, dairy fat results in a significantly greater CVD risk relative to unsaturated fatty acids. As research continues, we will refine our understanding of dietary patterns associated with lower CVD risk. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Cardiovascular Disease)

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