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Publications, Volume 1, Issue 1 (June 2013), Pages 1-48

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial Publications: A Journal Marking a Changing Time
Publications 2013, 1(1), 1-4; doi:10.3390/publications1010001
Received: 6 December 2012 / Accepted: 11 December 2012 / Published: 12 December 2012
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (137 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract Publishing, and by extension publication, is in a state of rapid flux. This has become evident in recent years, and some have now even characterized the domain as unstable, with the traditional forms of publication no longer being sustainable.[...] Full article

Research

Jump to: Editorial

Open AccessArticle Open Access—Are the Barriers to Change Receding?
Publications 2013, 1(1), 5-15; doi:10.3390/publications1010005
Received: 30 January 2013 / Revised: 4 April 2013 / Accepted: 7 April 2013 / Published: 12 April 2013
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (194 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The move from subscription only publishing of scholarly articles to open access has been much slower than previously anticipated by many Open Access (OA) advocates. Despite the many advantages that OA offers, this particular branch of E-commerce imposes several formidable barriers to change.
[...] Read more.
The move from subscription only publishing of scholarly articles to open access has been much slower than previously anticipated by many Open Access (OA) advocates. Despite the many advantages that OA offers, this particular branch of E-commerce imposes several formidable barriers to change. A framework conceptualizing these barriers that was developed over a decade ago was revisited to see if the significance of these barriers has changed. Nowadays, building the IT infrastructure, support from indexing services and finding a sustainable business model are no longer important barriers. For gold OA publishing the academic reward system is still a major obstacle, whereas more marketing and critical mass is needed for both gold OA and green OA. Green OA self-archiving is still also strongly affected by what subscription publishers allow. In the overall balance the situation has nevertheless improved significantly. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Open Access - A Review after 10 Years)
Open AccessArticle Types of Open Access Publishers in Scopus
Publications 2013, 1(1), 16-26; doi:10.3390/publications1010016
Received: 12 April 2013 / Revised: 27 April 2013 / Accepted: 27 April 2013 / Published: 6 May 2013
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (200 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study assessed characteristics of publishers who published 2010 open access (OA) journals indexed in Scopus. Publishers were categorized into six types; professional, society, university, scholar/researcher, government, and other organizations. Type of publisher was broken down by number of journals/articles published in 2010,
[...] Read more.
This study assessed characteristics of publishers who published 2010 open access (OA) journals indexed in Scopus. Publishers were categorized into six types; professional, society, university, scholar/researcher, government, and other organizations. Type of publisher was broken down by number of journals/articles published in 2010, funding model, location, discipline and whether the journal was born or converted to OA. Universities and societies accounted for 50% of the journals and 43% of the articles published. Professional publisher accounted for a third of the journals and 42% of the articles. With the exception of professional and scholar/researcher publishers, most journals were originally subscription journals that made at least their digital version freely available. Arts, humanities and social science journals are largely published by societies and universities outside the major publishing countries. Professional OA publishing is most common in biomedicine, mathematics, the sciences and engineering. Approximately a quarter of the journals are hosted on national/international platforms, in Latin America, Eastern Europe and Asia largely published by universities and societies without the need for publishing fees. This type of collaboration between governments, universities and/or societies may be an effective means of expanding open access publications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Open Access - A Review after 10 Years)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Open Access Publishing in Canada: Current and Future Library and University Press Supports
Publications 2013, 1(1), 27-48; doi:10.3390/publications1010027
Received: 2 May 2013 / Revised: 7 June 2013 / Accepted: 9 June 2013 / Published: 18 June 2013
PDF Full-text (510 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Canadian university libraries, Canadian university presses, and non-university scholarly presses at Canadian universities were surveyed in the first part of 2010 as to the level of their support of Open Access (OA) journal publishing. Respondents were asked about journal hosting services in their
[...] Read more.
Canadian university libraries, Canadian university presses, and non-university scholarly presses at Canadian universities were surveyed in the first part of 2010 as to the level of their support of Open Access (OA) journal publishing. Respondents were asked about journal hosting services in their organization as well as their thoughts on internal and external support for open access publishing. Results showed that most of the organizations are hosting OA journals, largely between one and five in number, and many supply journal hosting services, including some technical support. Personnel resources are a notable factor in the ability to host journals. Most respondents engage in some sort of internal support for open access publishing and are open to options that they are presently not utilizing. They are particularly amenable to OA publishing support from outside of their organizations, especially assistance at a consortial level. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Open Access - A Review after 10 Years)

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