Next Issue
Previous Issue

Table of Contents

Foods, Volume 6, Issue 10 (October 2017)

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-9
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle How Much Credence Does It Take? Evidence on the Trade-Off between Country-Of-Origin Information and Credence Attributes for Beef from a Choice Experiment in Sweden
Foods 2017, 6(10), 84; doi:10.3390/foods6100084
Received: 28 July 2017 / Revised: 20 September 2017 / Accepted: 21 September 2017 / Published: 25 September 2017
PDF Full-text (913 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Based on a discrete choice experiment with 336 consumers, this study investigated whether the consumer propensity to choose a simplified European Union (EU) vs. non-EU denomination of origin for beef, instead of a specific country-of-origin (COO) denomination, depends upon the amount and type
[...] Read more.
Based on a discrete choice experiment with 336 consumers, this study investigated whether the consumer propensity to choose a simplified European Union (EU) vs. non-EU denomination of origin for beef, instead of a specific country-of-origin (COO) denomination, depends upon the amount and type of credence information provided to the individual. The likelihood of choosing the EU/non-EU denomination of origin depended on the total number of other labelling credence attributes provided and also on the type of detailed credence attributes present in the choice. The presence of cues relating to animal welfare and far-reaching traceability had the highest likelihood of influencing the choice of the EU/non-EU denomination of origin. The compensatory qualities of each credence attribute in relation to the EU/non-EU origin denomination thus differed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Foods of Animal Origin)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Potential Use of Plant Waste from the Moth Orchid (Phalaenopsis Sogo Yukidian “V3”) as an Antioxidant Source
Foods 2017, 6(10), 85; doi:10.3390/foods6100085
Received: 16 July 2017 / Revised: 23 September 2017 / Accepted: 23 September 2017 / Published: 27 September 2017
PDF Full-text (744 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This research was conducted to exploit the waste of used plant parts from the widely marketed moth orchid cultivar (Phalaenopsis Sogo Yukidian “V3”). Various extracts of roots, stems, and leaves were evaluated for total phenolics, total flavonoids, and antioxidant capacity. The bound
[...] Read more.
This research was conducted to exploit the waste of used plant parts from the widely marketed moth orchid cultivar (Phalaenopsis Sogo Yukidian “V3”). Various extracts of roots, stems, and leaves were evaluated for total phenolics, total flavonoids, and antioxidant capacity. The bound extract from stems contained the highest total phenolics (5.092 ± 0.739 mg GAE (gallic acid equivalent)/g DW (dry weight)). The maximum total flavonoids (2.218 ± 0.021 mg RE (rutin equivalent)/g DW) were found in the hexane extract of leaves. Ethyl acetate extract from roots showed the greatest antioxidant activity compared to other extracts. Of these extracts, the IC50 values of these samples were 0.070 mg/mL, and 0.450 mg/mL in a free radical 1,-diphenyl-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) assay and reducing power method, respectively. The lipid peroxidation inhibition (LPI) was found to be 94.2% using the β-carotene bleaching method. Five phenolic compounds including caffeic acid, syringic acid, vanillin, ellagic acid, and cinnamic acid were quantified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). It is suggested that the roots of the hybrid Phalaenopsis Sogo Yukidian “V3” cultivar may be exploited as an effective source of antioxidants. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle The Availability of Slow and Fast Calories in the Dutch Diet: The Current Situation and Opportunities for Interventions
Foods 2017, 6(10), 87; doi:10.3390/foods6100087
Received: 30 June 2017 / Revised: 22 September 2017 / Accepted: 28 September 2017 / Published: 2 October 2017
PDF Full-text (530 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Choosing foods that require more time to consume and have a low energy density might constitute an effective strategy to control energy intake, because of their satiating capacity. The current study assessed the eating rate of Dutch food, and investigated the associations between
[...] Read more.
Choosing foods that require more time to consume and have a low energy density might constitute an effective strategy to control energy intake, because of their satiating capacity. The current study assessed the eating rate of Dutch food, and investigated the associations between eating rate and other food properties. We also explored the opportunities for a diet with a low energy intake rate (kJ/min). Laboratory data on the eating rate of 240 foods—representing the whole Dutch diet—was obtained. The results show a wide variation in both eating rate (from 2 g/min for rice waffle to 641 g/min for apple juice) and energy intake rate (from 0 kJ/min (0 kcal/min) for water to 1766 kJ/min (422 kcal/min) for chocolate milk). Eating rate was lower when foods were more solid. Moreover, eating rate was positively associated with water content and inversely with energy density. Energy intake rate differed substantially between and within food groups, demonstrating that the available foods provide opportunities for selecting alternatives with a lower energy intake rate. These findings offer guidance when selecting foods to reduce energy intake. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Choice, Ingestive Behavior and Sensation)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Determination of Salmonella spp., E. coli VTEC, Vibrio spp., and Norovirus GI-GII in Bivalve Molluscs Collected from Growing Natural Beds in Sardinia (Italy)
Foods 2017, 6(10), 88; doi:10.3390/foods6100088
Received: 1 August 2017 / Revised: 28 September 2017 / Accepted: 4 October 2017 / Published: 11 October 2017
PDF Full-text (229 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to evaluate the presence of Salmonella spp., verotoxigenic E. coli (VTEC), Vibrio spp., and Norovirus GI-GII in bivalve molluscs, cockles, and European grooved carpet shells (Cerastoderma spp. and Ruditapes decussatus) collected from a class
[...] Read more.
The aim of the present study was to evaluate the presence of Salmonella spp., verotoxigenic E. coli (VTEC), Vibrio spp., and Norovirus GI-GII in bivalve molluscs, cockles, and European grooved carpet shells (Cerastoderma spp. and Ruditapes decussatus) collected from a class B growing natural bed in Sardinia (Italy). All of the samples were analysed for Salmonella spp. detection according to European Commission Regulation (EC) 2285/2015. Detection and enumeration of Vibrio spp. were performed according to previously published methods. Presumptive identification of Vibrio spp. isolates was performed by means of conventional biochemical tests. E. coli VTEC was isolated following a direct multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) screening test. Norovirus GI and GII were determined by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). No Salmonella spp. were detected. The prevalence of Vibrio spp. was 90%, and the average contamination levels were 3.19 ± 1.07 and 2.84 ± 0.31 Log10 cfu/g in cockles and European grooved carpet shells, respectively. The prevalence of E. coli VTEC was 6.6%. All of the isolates showed a complete pathogenicity profile. The presence of Norovirus was highlighted in 25% of European grooved carpet shells samples. Results showed the typical microbiological profile of bivalve molluscs collected from backwaters and confirmed the capability of shellfish to accumulate E. coli VTEC, pathogenic vibrios, and Norovirus. The presence of such pathogens in shellfish is of major concern for the safety of consumers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seafood Products: Safety and Quality)
Open AccessArticle High Ethanol Contents of Spirit Drinks in Kibera Slums, Kenya: Implications for Public Health
Foods 2017, 6(10), 89; doi:10.3390/foods6100089
Received: 5 September 2017 / Revised: 30 September 2017 / Accepted: 11 October 2017 / Published: 17 October 2017
PDF Full-text (237 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Cheap licit and artisanal illicit spirit drinks have been associated with numerous outbreaks of alcohol poisoning especially with methanol. This study aimed to evaluate the quality of cheap spirit drinks in Kibera slums in Nairobi County, Kenya. The samples consisted of cheap licit
[...] Read more.
Cheap licit and artisanal illicit spirit drinks have been associated with numerous outbreaks of alcohol poisoning especially with methanol. This study aimed to evaluate the quality of cheap spirit drinks in Kibera slums in Nairobi County, Kenya. The samples consisted of cheap licit spirits (n = 11) and the artisanal spirit drink, ‘chang’aa’, (n = 28). The parameters of alcoholic strength and volatile composition were used as indicators of quality and were determined using gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) respectively. The ranges for alcoholic strength were 42.8–85.8% vol and 28.3–56.7% vol for chang’aa and licit spirit drinks respectively, while the pH ranges were 3.3–4.2 and 4.4–4.8 for chang’aa and licit spirit drinks respectively. The majority of volatiles were found in artisanal spirits and they included higher alcohols, ethyl esters and carbonyl compounds. The alcoholic strength of all the artisanal spirits (100%) and 91% of the licit spirits was above the 40% vol of standard spirits such as vodka. The high ethanol content of the alcohol products was the only element of public health significance in this study. Full article
Open AccessArticle Composition and Statistical Analysis of Biophenols in Apulian Italian EVOOs
Foods 2017, 6(10), 90; doi:10.3390/foods6100090
Received: 26 September 2017 / Revised: 11 October 2017 / Accepted: 16 October 2017 / Published: 18 October 2017
PDF Full-text (3657 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO) is among the basic constituents of the Mediterranean diet. Its nutraceutical properties are due mainly, but not only, to a plethora of molecules with antioxidant activity known as biophenols. In this article, several biophenols were measured in EVOOs from
[...] Read more.
Extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO) is among the basic constituents of the Mediterranean diet. Its nutraceutical properties are due mainly, but not only, to a plethora of molecules with antioxidant activity known as biophenols. In this article, several biophenols were measured in EVOOs from South Apulia, Italy. Hydroxytyrosol, tyrosol and their conjugated structures to elenolic acid in different forms were identified and quantified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) together with lignans, luteolin and α-tocopherol. The concentration of the analyzed metabolites was quite high in all the cultivars studied, but it was still possible to discriminate them through multivariate statistical analysis (MVA). Furthermore, principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) were also exploited for determining variances among samples depending on the interval time between harvesting and milling, on the age of the olive trees, and on the area where the olive trees were grown. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutraceuticals: The New Frontier)
Figures

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview The Psychology of Sustainable Seafood Consumption: A Comprehensive Approach
Foods 2017, 6(10), 86; doi:10.3390/foods6100086
Received: 12 September 2017 / Revised: 24 September 2017 / Accepted: 26 September 2017 / Published: 28 September 2017
PDF Full-text (394 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper discusses conceptual confusions of sustainable seafood consumption, practical challenges, and potential anchors from where this behaviour can be fostered. The main focus lies on psychological variables. The resulting framework comprises (1) a definition of sustainable seafood consumption, (2) suggestions for corresponding
[...] Read more.
This paper discusses conceptual confusions of sustainable seafood consumption, practical challenges, and potential anchors from where this behaviour can be fostered. The main focus lies on psychological variables. The resulting framework comprises (1) a definition of sustainable seafood consumption, (2) suggestions for corresponding behaviours, (3) the identification of facilitating and hindering factors, (4) an assemblage of these factors into a theoretical model, and (5) a short discussion of how the model adds up value to the current state of the art in marine resource conservation. Behavioural models significantly contribute to behavioural change research. The originality and value of this research are that it tackles the so far relatively neglected field of sustainable seafood consumption as important part of sustainable development and marine conservation in the future. From an interventional perspective, the developed model facilitates the identification of contact points to approach consumers and disseminate sustainable seafood consumption among modern Western consumers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seafood Products: Safety and Quality)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview Review of Black Soldier Fly (Hermetia illucens) as Animal Feed and Human Food
Foods 2017, 6(10), 91; doi:10.3390/foods6100091
Received: 8 August 2017 / Revised: 1 October 2017 / Accepted: 2 October 2017 / Published: 18 October 2017
PDF Full-text (335 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Food futurists accept that sustainability-minded humanity will increasingly incorporate insects as alternative protein. The most studied and easily reared species are not necessarily the most sustainable, acceptable, or delicious. Here, we review the literature on the black soldier fly, Hermetia illucens, which is
[...] Read more.
Food futurists accept that sustainability-minded humanity will increasingly incorporate insects as alternative protein. The most studied and easily reared species are not necessarily the most sustainable, acceptable, or delicious. Here, we review the literature on the black soldier fly, Hermetia illucens, which is capable of efficiently converting a wide variety of organic materials, from food waste to manure, into insect biomass. They can be grown and harvested without dedicated facilities and are not pestiferous. Their larvae are 42% crude protein and 29% fat, although they are higher in saturated fats than most insects. They do not concentrate pesticides or mycotoxins. They are already grown and recommended for use as animal feed, but with regional legal restrictions on how this is done. For commercial use in human foods, larvae could potentially be milled and converted into a textured protein with a strong flavor. Their biggest advantage over other insects is their ability to convert waste into food, generating value and closing nutrient loops as they reduce pollution and costs. This general advantage is also their greatest disadvantage, for the social stigmas and legal prohibitions against eating organisms that eat waste are added to extant taboos facing insect consumption. Full article
Open AccessReview Curcumin: A Review of Its’ Effects on Human Health
Foods 2017, 6(10), 92; doi:10.3390/foods6100092
Received: 2 September 2017 / Revised: 18 October 2017 / Accepted: 20 October 2017 / Published: 22 October 2017
PDF Full-text (231 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Turmeric, a spice that has long been recognized for its medicinal properties, has received interest from both the medical/scientific world and from culinary enthusiasts, as it is the major source of the polyphenol curcumin. It aids in the management of oxidative and inflammatory
[...] Read more.
Turmeric, a spice that has long been recognized for its medicinal properties, has received interest from both the medical/scientific world and from culinary enthusiasts, as it is the major source of the polyphenol curcumin. It aids in the management of oxidative and inflammatory conditions, metabolic syndrome, arthritis, anxiety, and hyperlipidemia. It may also help in the management of exercise-induced inflammation and muscle soreness, thus enhancing recovery and performance in active people. In addition, a relatively low dose of the complex can provide health benefits for people that do not have diagnosed health conditions. Most of these benefits can be attributed to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Ingesting curcumin by itself does not lead to the associated health benefits due to its poor bioavailability, which appears to be primarily due to poor absorption, rapid metabolism, and rapid elimination. There are several components that can increase bioavailability. For example, piperine is the major active component of black pepper and, when combined in a complex with curcumin, has been shown to increase bioavailability by 2000%. Curcumin combined with enhancing agents provides multiple health benefits. The purpose of this review is to provide a brief overview of the plethora of research regarding the health benefits of curcumin. Full article
Back to Top