Special Issue "Antioxidants and Periodontal Diseases"

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A special issue of Antioxidants (ISSN 2076-3921).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2015)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Maurizio Battino (Website)

Department of Odontostomatologic and Specialized Clinical Sciences, Sez-Biochimica, Faculty of Medicine, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Via Ranieri 65, 60100 Ancona, Italy
Phone: +39 071 2204646
Fax: +39 071 2204398
Interests: nutrition; periodontal diseases/periodontitis; oxidative stress; nutrition; aging; mitochondrial function and diseases; berries (strawberry, blueberry, bilberry, cranberry, etc.); olive oil (dietary fats); honey, polyphenols; flavonoids; antioxidants, apoptosis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Special Issue on “Antioxidants and Periodontal Diseases” will focus on the roles played by antioxidants in modulating or ameliorating periodontal diseases. Such diseases are largely represented by chronic conditions and are prevalent in approximately 50% of adults in the USA (30-60% of the population above 35 yrs is affected in Europe, according to results from different studies). Exogenous and antioxidants supplemented/administered through dietary or pharmacological treatment are focal points for this issue, as are endogenous antioxidants, antioxidant systems/devices or other systems capable of affecting, directly and/or indirectly, the cell homeostasis, its redox balance and, definitively, its response to periodontal-linked stressors.

It has been widely demonstrated that oxidative stress and inflammation processes are deeply involved in the onset and development of periodontal diseases. Their mechanisms are often shared by other systemic chronic diseases which are the primary cause of disability worldwide (i.e., type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases, atherosclerosis, etc.). Among the aims of this issue is the identification and discussion of all the modifiable inflammatory and redox-linked risk factors which are commonly shared by periodontal diseases and the various systemic chronic conditions mentioned above, with special attention to the possible role played by healthy nutrition and/or malnutrition.

Prof. Dr. Maurizio Battino
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antioxidants is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 300 CHF (Swiss Francs). English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Keywords

  • inflammation
  • nutrition
  • oxidative stress
  • apoptosis
  • systemic chronic diseases
  • obesity
  • metabolic syndrome
  • type 2 diabetes
  • cardiovascular diseases
  • atherosclerosis

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Drinking Hydrogen-Rich Water Has Additive Effects on Non-Surgical Periodontal Treatment of Improving Periodontitis: A Pilot Study
Antioxidants 2015, 4(3), 513-522; doi:10.3390/antiox4030513
Received: 23 April 2015 / Revised: 19 June 2015 / Accepted: 1 July 2015 / Published: 9 July 2015
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Abstract
Oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of periodontitis. A reduction of oxidative stress by drinking hydrogen-rich water (HW) might be beneficial to periodontal health. In this pilot study, we compared the effects of non-surgical periodontal treatment with or without drinking HW [...] Read more.
Oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of periodontitis. A reduction of oxidative stress by drinking hydrogen-rich water (HW) might be beneficial to periodontal health. In this pilot study, we compared the effects of non-surgical periodontal treatment with or without drinking HW on periodontitis. Thirteen patients (3 women, 10 men) with periodontitis were divided into two groups: The control group (n = 6) or the HW group (n = 7). In the HW group, participants consumed HW 4–5 times/day for eight weeks. At two to four weeks, all participants received non-surgical periodontal treatment. Oral examinations were performed at baseline, two, four and eight weeks, and serum was obtained at these time points to evaluate oxidative stress. At baseline, there were no significant differences in periodontal status between the control and HW groups. The HW group showed greater improvements in probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level than the control group at two, four and eight weeks (p < 0.05). The HW group also exhibited an increased serum level of total antioxidant capacity at four weeks, compared to baseline (p < 0.05). Drinking HW enhanced the effects of non-surgical periodontal treatment, thus improving periodontitis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidants and Periodontal Diseases)

Review

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Open AccessReview Hydrogen Sulfide, Oxidative Stress and Periodontal Diseases: A Concise Review
Antioxidants 2016, 5(1), 3; doi:10.3390/antiox5010003
Received: 2 December 2015 / Revised: 29 December 2015 / Accepted: 30 December 2015 / Published: 14 January 2016
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Abstract
In the past years, biomedical research has recognized hydrogen sulfide (H2S) not only as an environmental pollutant but also, along with nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, as an important biological gastransmitter with paramount roles in health and disease. Current research [...] Read more.
In the past years, biomedical research has recognized hydrogen sulfide (H2S) not only as an environmental pollutant but also, along with nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, as an important biological gastransmitter with paramount roles in health and disease. Current research focuses on several aspects of H2S biology such as the biochemical pathways that generate the compound and its functions in human pathology or drug synthesis that block or stimulate its biosynthesis. The present work addresses the knowledge we have to date on H2S production and its biological roles in the general human environment with a special focus on the oral cavity and its involvement in the initiation and development of periodontal diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidants and Periodontal Diseases)
Open AccessReview Periodontal Disease-Induced Atherosclerosis and Oxidative Stress
Antioxidants 2015, 4(3), 577-590; doi:10.3390/antiox4030577
Received: 9 July 2015 / Revised: 11 August 2015 / Accepted: 18 August 2015 / Published: 2 September 2015
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Abstract
Periodontal disease is a highly prevalent disorder affecting up to 80% of the global population. Recent epidemiological studies have shown an association between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease, as oxidative stress plays an important role in chronic inflammatory diseases such as periodontal [...] Read more.
Periodontal disease is a highly prevalent disorder affecting up to 80% of the global population. Recent epidemiological studies have shown an association between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease, as oxidative stress plays an important role in chronic inflammatory diseases such as periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease. In this review, we focus on the mechanisms by which periodontopathic bacteria cause chronic inflammation through the enhancement of oxidative stress and accelerate cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, we comment on the antioxidative activity of catechin in atherosclerosis accelerated by periodontitis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidants and Periodontal Diseases)
Open AccessReview Non-Nutrient, Naturally Occurring Phenolic Compounds with Antioxidant Activity for the Prevention and Treatment of Periodontal Diseases
Antioxidants 2015, 4(3), 447-481; doi:10.3390/antiox4030447
Received: 9 March 2015 / Revised: 28 May 2015 / Accepted: 29 May 2015 / Published: 24 June 2015
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (794 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
One of the main factors able to explain the pathophysiological mechanism of inflammatory conditions that occur in periodontal disease is oxidative stress. Given the emerging understanding of this relationship, host-modulatory therapies using antioxidants could be interesting to prevent or slow the breakdown [...] Read more.
One of the main factors able to explain the pathophysiological mechanism of inflammatory conditions that occur in periodontal disease is oxidative stress. Given the emerging understanding of this relationship, host-modulatory therapies using antioxidants could be interesting to prevent or slow the breakdown of soft and hard periodontal tissues. In this context, non-nutrient phenolic compounds of various foods and plants have received considerable attention in the last decade. Here, studies focusing on the relationship between different compounds of this type with periodontal disease have been collected. Among them, thymoquinone, coenzyme Q (CoQ), mangiferin, resveratrol, verbascoside and some flavonoids have shown to prevent or ameliorate periodontal tissues damage in animal models. However evidence regarding this effect in humans is poor and only limited to topical treatments with CoQ and catechins. Along with animal experiments, in vitro studies indicate that possible mechanisms by which these compounds might exert their protective effects include antioxidative properties, oxygen and nitrogen scavenging abilities, and also inhibitory effects on cell signaling cascades related to inflammatory processes which have an effect on RNS or ROS production as well as on antioxidant defense systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidants and Periodontal Diseases)
Open AccessReview Oxidative Stress and Dietary Fat Type in Relation to Periodontal Disease
Antioxidants 2015, 4(2), 322-344; doi:10.3390/antiox4020322
Received: 4 March 2015 / Revised: 17 April 2015 / Accepted: 20 April 2015 / Published: 28 April 2015
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (795 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Oxidative stress is one of the main factors studied to explain the pathophysiological mechanisms of inflammatory conditions, such as periodontitis. In this respect, nutrition may be of great importance. Actually, research on nutrients’ effects on periodontal diseases has expanded to include those [...] Read more.
Oxidative stress is one of the main factors studied to explain the pathophysiological mechanisms of inflammatory conditions, such as periodontitis. In this respect, nutrition may be of great importance. Actually, research on nutrients’ effects on periodontal diseases has expanded to include those influencing the redox status, which correlates to the inflammatory process. Dietary fat or lipids are often blamed as the major source of excess energy. Consequently, when caloric intake exceeds energy expenditure, the resultant substrate-induced increase in citric acid cycle activity generates an excess of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In addition, dietary fatty acid intake influences in relative fatty acid composition of biological membranes determining its susceptibility to oxidative alterations. From this standpoint, here, we reviewed studies analyzing the dietary fat role in periodontal disease. Research data suggest that periodontal health could be achieved by main dietary strategies which include substitution of saturated fats with monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), particularly n-3 PUFA. Maybe in the future, we should analyze the diet and provide some advice to periodontitis patients to improve treatment outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antioxidants and Periodontal Diseases)

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