Special Issue "Biomonitoring of Atmospheric Pollution"

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Air Quality".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Valeria Spagnuolo

Department of Biology, University of Naples Federico II, Italy
Website 1 | Website 2 | E-Mail
Interests: air biomonitoring; plant biomonitors; metals; PAHs; plants and metal stress
Guest Editor
Dr. Fiore Capozzi

Department of Biology, University of Naples Federico II, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: air biomonitoring; environmental pollution; metals; PAHs; plants and metal stress

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleauges,

Achieving good air quality is a necessity for human health and wellbeing. In spite of the introduction of cleaner technologies in industry, energy production and transport, air pollution remains a major health risk. Recently WHO (the World Health Organization) reported that air pollution in 2012 caused the deaths of about seven million people worldwide (WHO, 2014). This confirms air pollution as one of the most important environmental health risk in the world and indicates its reduction as an urgent task to save millions of lives. Before taking actions to improve air quality, an effort should be done to understand the mechanisms of pollutant dispersion and hence realize the best solutions for their monitoring. The automatic devices used nowadays for air monitoring are accurate but too limited in number (due to their excessive costs) to describe the spatial-temporal trends of pollutants. In addition, we lack information on the air quality from many places like private homes and work places. Therefore, there is an urgent need to implement and employ new low-cost and robust tools for monitoring air quality. Biomonitoring is an adequate alternative technique to acquire data about pollution, but to date, there are still some open issues needing exploration by the scientific community involved in this field. All this research, based on new biomontoring techniques or based on the improvement of already existing methodologies, are welcome in this Special Issue.

Prof. Valeria Spagnuolo
Dr. Fiore Capozzi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Atmosphere is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • air pollution
  • air biomonitoring
  • inorganic pollutants
  • organic pollutants

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Levels of Antioxidant Compound Glutathione in Moss from Industrial Areas
Atmosphere 2018, 9(7), 284; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos9070284
Received: 11 May 2018 / Revised: 16 July 2018 / Accepted: 18 July 2018 / Published: 19 July 2018
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Abstract
Plants possess a wide range of cellular mechanisms that help them tolerate potentially toxic substances. Several studies that were carried out under laboratory conditions have demonstrated that the antioxidant compound glutathione plays a role in enabling mosses to tolerate high levels of heavy
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Plants possess a wide range of cellular mechanisms that help them tolerate potentially toxic substances. Several studies that were carried out under laboratory conditions have demonstrated that the antioxidant compound glutathione plays a role in enabling mosses to tolerate high levels of heavy metals without toxic effects. However, until now, the antioxidant levels have not been studied in mosses under field conditions. In this study, we aimed to clarify the antioxidant concentrations of glutathione in the terrestrial moss Pseudoscleropodium purum growing in industrial environments characterised by high atmospheric levels of Cd, Ni, and Pb, and to evaluate the potential use of the compound as a biomarker. The results indicated the existence of a glutathione threshold response, which was significantly correlated with the metal toxicity and which may be influenced by metal bioavailability. Although future studies are needed to strengthen the findings, the present study suggests that total concentration of glutathione in P. purum could therefore be used as a biomarker in air pollution biomonitoring studies, provided that metal bioavailability is taken into account. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomonitoring of Atmospheric Pollution)
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Open AccessArticle Magnetic Biomonitoring as a Tool for Assessment of Air Pollution Patterns in a Tropical Valley Using Tillandsia sp.
Atmosphere 2018, 9(7), 283; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos9070283
Received: 5 May 2018 / Revised: 11 June 2018 / Accepted: 19 June 2018 / Published: 19 July 2018
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Abstract
Recently, air pollution alerts were issued in the Metropolitan Area of Aburrá Valley (AVMA) due to the highest recorded levels of particulate matter (PM2.5 and PM10) ever measured. We propose a novel methodology based on magnetic parameters and an epiphytic
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Recently, air pollution alerts were issued in the Metropolitan Area of Aburrá Valley (AVMA) due to the highest recorded levels of particulate matter (PM2.5 and PM10) ever measured. We propose a novel methodology based on magnetic parameters and an epiphytic biomonitor of air pollution in order to improve the air pollution monitoring network at low cost. This methodology relies on environmental magnetism along with chemical methods on 185 Tillandsia recurvata specimens collected along the valley (290 km2). The highest magnetic particle concentrations were found at the bottom of the valley, where most human activities are concentrated. Mass-specific magnetic susceptibility (χ) reaches mean (and s.d.) values of 93.5 (81.0) and 100.8 (64.9) × 10−8 m3 kg−1 in areas with high vehicular traffic and industrial activity, while lower χ values of 27.3 (21.0) × 10−8 m3 kg−1 were found at residential areas. Most magnetite particles are breathable in size (0.2–5 μm), and can host potentially toxic elements. The calculated pollution load index (PLI, based on potentially toxic elements) shows significant correlations with the concentration-dependent magnetic parameters (R = 0.88–0.93; p < 0.01), allowing us to validate the magnetic biomonitoring methodology in high-precipitation tropical cities and identify the most polluted areas in the AVMA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomonitoring of Atmospheric Pollution)
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