Special Issue "Impacts of Climate Change on Human Health"

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Biometeorology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Clare Heaviside

Chemical and Environmental Effects Department, Public Health England, Oxon, UK
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 01235 825142
Interests: climate change; urban climate; Urban Heat Island; climate and health; air pollution; temperatures; heatwaves; extreme events; climate change impacts and attribution; meteorology; ocean and atmosphere interactions

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Climate change affects health in a variety of ways, and impacts will vary depending on geographical location. Direct impacts on health may occur due to changes in the frequency and severity of extreme weather events such as heatwaves and floods. However, climate change will also lead to indirect impacts; for example, from changes in vector borne disease risk, air quality, food availability and more. Careful examination of risks and impacts expected in future can help motivate efforts to limit the global extent of climate change.

This Special Issue is now open for submissions of novel and original articles outlining research to investigate and quantify a range of health impacts relating to climate change, in all regions of the world. Studies investigating climate change adaptation, health effects of intervention measures and health co-benefits of measures to mitigate climate change are welcomed. Detailed and focused reviews on specific related topics are welcome; please contact the editorial office in advance in this case.

Dr. Clare Heaviside
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Atmosphere is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • climate change
  • public health
  • extreme weather
  • heatwaves
  • climate change adaptation
  • health co-benefits

Published Papers (2 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-2
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Thermal Conditions in the City of Poznań (Poland) during Selected Heat Waves
Atmosphere 2018, 9(1), 11; doi:10.3390/atmos9010011
Received: 10 November 2017 / Revised: 7 December 2017 / Accepted: 3 January 2018 / Published: 7 January 2018
PDF Full-text (16162 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The aim of the study was to characterise the occurrence of hot days and heat waves in Poznań in the 1966–2015 period, as well as to describe the thermal conditions in the city during selected heat waves between 2008 and 2015. The basis
[...] Read more.
The aim of the study was to characterise the occurrence of hot days and heat waves in Poznań in the 1966–2015 period, as well as to describe the thermal conditions in the city during selected heat waves between 2008 and 2015. The basis of the study was the daily maximum and minimum air temperature values for Poznań–Ławica station from 1966–2015 and the daily values of air temperature from eight measuring points located in the city in various land types from 2008 to 2015. A hot day was defined as a day with Tmax above the 95th annual percentile (from 1966 to 2015), while a heat wave was assumed to be at least five consecutive hot days. The research study conducted shows the increase of Tmax, number of hot days and frequency of heat waves in Poznań over the last 50 years. Across the area of the city (differentiation of urban area types according to Urban Atlas 2012), there was a great diversity of thermal conditions during the heat waves analysed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impacts of Climate Change on Human Health)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle The Summers 2003 and 2015 in South-West Germany: Heat Waves and Heat-Related Mortality in the Context of Climate Change
Atmosphere 2017, 8(11), 224; doi:10.3390/atmos8110224
Received: 15 August 2017 / Revised: 3 November 2017 / Accepted: 7 November 2017 / Published: 15 November 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (913 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
After 2003, another hot summer took place in Western and Central Europe in 2015. In this study, we compare the characteristics of the two major heat waves of these two summers and their effect on the heat related mortality. The analysis is performed
[...] Read more.
After 2003, another hot summer took place in Western and Central Europe in 2015. In this study, we compare the characteristics of the two major heat waves of these two summers and their effect on the heat related mortality. The analysis is performed with focus on South-West Germany (Baden–Württemberg). With an additional mean summer mortality of +7.9% (2003) and +5.8% (2015) both years mark the top-two records of the summer mortality in the period 1968–2015. In each summer, one major heat wave contributed strongly to the excess summer mortality: In August 2003, daily mortality reached anomalies of +70% and in July 2015 maximum deviations of +56% were observed. The August 2003 heat wave was very long-lasting and characterized by exceptional high maximum and minimum temperatures. In July 2015, temperatures were slightly lower than in 2003, however, the high air humidity during the day and night, lead to comparable heat loads. Furthermore, the heat wave occurred earlier during the summer, when the population was less acclimated to heat stress. Using regional climate models we project an increasing probability for future 2003- and 2015-like heat waves already in the near future (2021–2050), with a 2015-like event occurring about every second summer. In the far future (2070–2099) pronounced increases with more than two 2015-like heat waves per summer are possible. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impacts of Climate Change on Human Health)
Figures

Figure 1

Back to Top