Special Issue "Fire and the Atmosphere"

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 April 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Scott L. Goodrick

Center for Forest Disturbance Science, USDA Forest Service, Athens, USA
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fire is an integral component of many ecosystems. However, fire also poses a growing threat to human lives and property. The role of fire management is to maintain the ecological benefits of fire while minimizing the adverse impacts of fire on society. The atmosphere plays a critical role in fire management as it is a key driver of fire acting through an array of coupled processes spanning a wide range of space and time scales. The focus of this Special Issue is to explore the atmosphere’s role in a range of fire related topics including fire spread, fuels, climate change, fire behavior, smoke, fire weather and fire climate. Manuscripts based on field studies and/or modeling from around the world are welcome. The goal for the issue is to extend fire and forest meteorology science, as well as offer applied concepts for fire management practitioners.

Dr. Scott L. Goodrick
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Atmosphere is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • fire weather
  • fire climate
  • smoke management
  • fire-atmosphere interactions
  • fire behavior
  • fire danger

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Air-Pollutant Emissions from Agricultural Burning in Mae Chaem Basin, Chiang Mai Province, Thailand
Atmosphere 2018, 9(4), 145; doi:10.3390/atmos9040145
Received: 20 February 2018 / Revised: 2 April 2018 / Accepted: 10 April 2018 / Published: 13 April 2018
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Abstract
Particulate pollution is a continual problem which is usually caused by the burning of crop residues in highland agricultural systems. The objectives of this study are to investigate crop-residue management and estimate the amount of pollutant emissions from burning crop residues for each
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Particulate pollution is a continual problem which is usually caused by the burning of crop residues in highland agricultural systems. The objectives of this study are to investigate crop-residue management and estimate the amount of pollutant emissions from burning crop residues for each land-use pattern (grain maize, seed maize and integrated farming), and to estimate the chemical compositions of PM2.5 emissions from agricultural burning in Mae Chaem basin, Chiang Mai Province, Thailand. The purposive sampling method was used for sample selection. A door-to-door questionnaire survey was used to obtain responses from 149 respondents. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the open burning of crop residues were estimated, using specific emission factors obtained from several literature reviews and from the field by the questionnaire survey. Results revealed that the majority of farmers burned maize residues during April and May and mostly in the afternoon. These burning behaviors are in line with the supportive weather conditions that reflect high values of temperature and wind speed, and less rainfall and relative humidity result in maize residues being burned easily and quickly. The integrated farming system generated the lowest GHG emissions and amount of chemical composition of PM2.5 emissions, followed by the grain maize and seed maize patterns, respectively. This study strongly supports the implementation of the integrated farming system in Mae Chaem basin. Proactive and reactive measures should be taken in a well-organized and systematic fashion and should engage all related parties. More importantly, there is an urgent need for policy makers to include PM2.5 concentrations to upgrade Thailand’s air-quality index (PM2.5 AQI). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fire and the Atmosphere)
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