Special Issue "MEMS/NEMS Fabricated Tissue Scaffolding Devices"

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A special issue of Bioengineering (ISSN 2306-5354).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2015)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Gou-Jen Wang

Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung 40227, Taiwan
Website | E-Mail
Interests: micro/nano fabrication; tissue engineering; biosensors; dye-sensitized solar cells

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the past decade, tissue engineering in the field of medicine has proven to provide alternative therapies for tissue or organ implants, especially providing a functional implantation and avoiding immune rejection of tissues and organs. Cell, scaffold and growth information are considered to be the basic elements of tissue engineering. Scaffolds are expected to support cell colonization, migration, growth and differentiation, and to guide the development of the required tissue. In cell biology, it has been demonstrated that cell adhesion, proliferation, migration and differentiation can be manipulated using scaffolds of different micro- or nano-structures. Recent progress in MEMS/NEMS fabrication techniques has enabled the production of diverse scaffolds of micro- and nano-structures, on various biomaterials, for tissue regeneration applications. This special issue focuses on the state of the art in scaffold design and fabrication themes based on MEMS/NEMS manufacturing techniques. The topics include the design, fabrication, characterization and cell culture of the tissue scaffolds using MEMS/NEMS approaches.

Prof. Dr. Gou-Jen Wang
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Bioengineering is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. For the first couple of issues the Article Processing Charge (APC) will be waived for well-prepared manuscripts. English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.


Keywords

  • Tissue engineering
  • Tissue scaffold design
  • MEMS/NEMS fabricated tissue scaffold

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial Special Issue on “MEMS/NEMS Fabricated Tissue Scaffolding Devices”
Bioengineering 2014, 1(2), 113; doi:10.3390/bioengineering1020113
Received: 4 June 2014 / Accepted: 5 June 2014 / Published: 5 June 2014
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Abstract Over the past decade, tissue engineering in the field of medicine has proven to provide alternative therapies for tissue or organ implants, especially providing a functional implantation and avoiding immune rejection of tissues and organs. [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue MEMS/NEMS Fabricated Tissue Scaffolding Devices)

Research

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Open AccessArticle Ovarian Cancer Cell Adhesion/Migration Dynamics on Micro-Structured Laminin Gradients Fabricated by Multiphoton Excited Photochemistry
Bioengineering 2015, 2(3), 139-159; doi:10.3390/bioengineering2030139
Received: 11 April 2015 / Revised: 1 July 2015 / Accepted: 9 July 2015 / Published: 16 July 2015
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Abstract
Haptotaxis, i.e., cell migration in response to adhesive gradients, has been previously implicated in cancer metastasis. A better understanding of cell migration dynamics and their regulation could ultimately lead to new drug targets, especially for cancers with poor prognoses, such as ovarian
[...] Read more.
Haptotaxis, i.e., cell migration in response to adhesive gradients, has been previously implicated in cancer metastasis. A better understanding of cell migration dynamics and their regulation could ultimately lead to new drug targets, especially for cancers with poor prognoses, such as ovarian cancer. Haptotaxis has not been well-studied due to the lack of biomimetic, biocompatible models, where, for example, microcontact printing and microfluidics approaches are primarily limited to 2D surfaces and cannot produce the 3D submicron features to which cells respond. Here we used multiphoton excited (MPE) phototochemistry to fabricate nano/microstructured gradients of laminin (LN) as 2.5D models of the ovarian basal lamina to study the haptotaxis dynamics of a series of ovarian cancer cells. Using these models, we found that increased LN concentration increased migration speed and also alignment of the overall cell morphology and their cytoskeleton along the linear axis of the gradients. Both these metrics were enhanced on LN compared to BSA gradients of the same design, demonstrating the importance of both topographic and ECM cues on the adhesion/migration dynamics. Using two different gradient designs, we addressed the question of the roles of local concentration and slope and found that the specific haptotactic response depends on the cell phenotype and not simply the gradient design. Moreover, small changes in concentration strongly affected the migration properties. This work is a necessary step in studying haptotaxis in more complete 3D models of the tumor microenvironment for ovarian and other cancers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue MEMS/NEMS Fabricated Tissue Scaffolding Devices)

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