Special Issue "Nanomaterials for Biodetection and Drug Delivery"

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A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2013)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Chenxu Yu

Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, Iowa State University, 3224 NSRIC, Ames, Iowa 50011, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +1 515 294 4554
Fax: +1 515 294 4250
Interests: nanomaterials; nanobiosensors; spectroscopic biosensing; biodetection; diagnostics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The special issue on “Nanomaterials for Biodetection and Drug Delivery” will be a compendium of latest research on the utilization and development of nanomaterials for biodetection and drug delivery, including but not limited to developing nanotechnologies to detect and/or characterize biological and chemical agents related to plant, food, soil, animal, and human systems, and developing nanomaterials and systems for more effective and controlled delivery of therapeutic agents/drugs. On the biodetection front, we set to address biosensors based on electrochemical, optical, mass, acoustic, magnetic, and immuno-based concepts that explore nano-enabled target recognition beyond standard antibody-antigen interactions, such as aptamers, peptides, carbohydrate-lipid-based linkers are all of interest. On the drug delivery front, novel design of nano-enabled drug delivery systems and their performance evaluation and characterization will be entertained.

Dr. Chenxu Yu
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 300 CHF (Swiss Francs). English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.


Keywords

  • nanobiosensors
  • pathogens
  • toxin
  • diagnostics
  • biosafety and biosecurity
  • drug delivery
  • food and environmental safety

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Cell Labeling for 19F MRI: New and Improved Approach to Perfluorocarbon Nanoemulsion Design
Biosensors 2013, 3(3), 341-359; doi:10.3390/bios3030341
Received: 1 August 2013 / Revised: 2 September 2013 / Accepted: 9 September 2013 / Published: 23 September 2013
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (759 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This report describes novel perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanoemulsions designed to improve ex vivo cell labeling for 19F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). 19F MRI is a powerful non-invasive technique for monitoring cells of the immune system in vivo, where cells are labeled
[...] Read more.
This report describes novel perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanoemulsions designed to improve ex vivo cell labeling for 19F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). 19F MRI is a powerful non-invasive technique for monitoring cells of the immune system in vivo, where cells are labeled ex vivo with PFC nanoemulsions in cell culture. The quality of 19F MRI is directly affected by the quality of ex vivo PFC cell labeling. When co-cultured with cells for longer periods of time, nanoemulsions tend to settle due to high specific weight of PFC oils (1.5–2.0 g/mL). This in turn can decrease efficacy of excess nanoemulsion removal and reliability of the cell labeling in vitro. To solve this problem, novel PFC nanoemulsions are reported which demonstrate lack of sedimentation and high stability under cell labeling conditions. They are monodisperse, have small droplet size (~130 nm) and low polydispersity (<0.15), show a single peak in the 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum at −71.4 ppm and possess high fluorine content. The droplet size and polydispersity remained unchanged after 160 days of follow up at three temperatures (4, 25 and 37 °C). Further, stressors such as elevated temperature in the presence of cells, and centrifugation, did not affect the nanoemulsion droplet size and polydispersity. Detailed synthetic methodology and in vitro testing for these new PFC nanoemulsions is presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Biodetection and Drug Delivery)
Open AccessArticle A Self-Referencing Detection of Microorganisms Using Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering Nanoprobes in a Test-in-a-Tube Platform
Biosensors 2013, 3(3), 312-326; doi:10.3390/bios3030312
Received: 24 July 2013 / Revised: 28 August 2013 / Accepted: 5 September 2013 / Published: 13 September 2013
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (357 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Anisotropic nanoparticles (i.e., silver nanocubes) were functionalized with target-specific antibodies and Raman active tags to serve as nanoprobes for the rapid detection of bacteria in a test-in-a-tube platform. A self-referencing scheme was developed and implemented in which surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic
[...] Read more.
Anisotropic nanoparticles (i.e., silver nanocubes) were functionalized with target-specific antibodies and Raman active tags to serve as nanoprobes for the rapid detection of bacteria in a test-in-a-tube platform. A self-referencing scheme was developed and implemented in which surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic (SERS) signatures of the targets were observed superimposed with the SERS signals of the Raman tags. The assessment through the dual signals (superimposed target and tag Raman signatures) supported a specific recognition of the targets in a single step with no washing/separation needed to a sensitivity of 102 CFU/mL, even in the presence of non-target bacteria at a 10 times higher concentration. The self-referencing protocol implemented with a portable Raman spectrometer potentially can become an easy-to-use, field-deployable spectroscopic sensor for onsite detection of pathogenic microorganisms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Biodetection and Drug Delivery)
Open AccessArticle The Effect of 3-Thiopheneacetic Acid in the Polymerization of a Conductive Electrotextile for Use in Biosensor Development
Biosensors 2013, 3(3), 286-296; doi:10.3390/bios3030286
Received: 16 June 2013 / Revised: 15 July 2013 / Accepted: 22 July 2013 / Published: 29 July 2013
PDF Full-text (326 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Investigations were conducted to develop an electrotextile using a nonwoven polypropylene fiber platform conformally coated in a conductive, functionalized copolymer of polypyrrole and 3-thiopheneacetic acid (3TAA). The objectives of this study were to determine: (1) if the inclusion of 3TAA in the polymerization
[...] Read more.
Investigations were conducted to develop an electrotextile using a nonwoven polypropylene fiber platform conformally coated in a conductive, functionalized copolymer of polypyrrole and 3-thiopheneacetic acid (3TAA). The objectives of this study were to determine: (1) if the inclusion of 3TAA in the polymerization process would have an effect on the availability of binding sites in the high-surface area electrotextile for biorecognition elements and (2) how the increase in the concentration of 3TAA would affect the physical characteristics of the coating, resistivity of the sample and availability of binding sites. It was found that the addition of 3TAA to the polymerization process resulted in an increase in the size of the polypyrrole coating, as well as the material resistivity and available binding sites for biorecognition elements. These factors were used to determine which of the tested concentrations was best for biosensor development. A polymer coated membrane sample containing a concentration within the range of 10–50 mg/mL of 3TAA was selected as the best for future biosensor work. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Biodetection and Drug Delivery)
Open AccessArticle Improving the Design of a MscL-Based Triggered Nanovalve
Biosensors 2013, 3(1), 171-184; doi:10.3390/bios3010171
Received: 1 February 2013 / Revised: 5 March 2013 / Accepted: 12 March 2013 / Published: 19 March 2013
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (480 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The mechanosensitive channel of large conductance, MscL, has been proposed as a triggered nanovalve to be used in drug release and other nanodevices. It is a small homopentameric bacterial protein that has the largest gated pore known: greater than 30 Å. Large molecules,
[...] Read more.
The mechanosensitive channel of large conductance, MscL, has been proposed as a triggered nanovalve to be used in drug release and other nanodevices. It is a small homopentameric bacterial protein that has the largest gated pore known: greater than 30 Å. Large molecules, even small proteins can be released through MscL. Although MscL normally gates in response to membrane tension, early studies found that hydrophilic or charged residue substitutions near the constriction of the channel leads to pore opening. Researchers have successfully changed the modality of MscL to open to stimuli such as light by chemically modifying a single residue, G22, within the MscL pore. Here, by utilizing in vivo, liposome efflux, and patch clamp assays we compared modification of G22 with that of another neighboring residue, G26, and demonstrate that modifying G26 may be a better choice for triggered nanovalves used for triggered vesicular release of compounds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Biodetection and Drug Delivery)
Figures

Review

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Open AccessReview Lab-on-a-Chip Magneto-Immunoassays: How to Ensure Contact between Superparamagnetic Beads and the Sensor Surface
Biosensors 2013, 3(3), 327-340; doi:10.3390/bios3030327
Received: 24 July 2013 / Revised: 27 August 2013 / Accepted: 12 September 2013 / Published: 17 September 2013
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (553 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Lab-on-a-chip immuno assays utilizing superparamagnetic beads as labels suffer from the fact that the majority of beads pass the sensing area without contacting the sensor surface. Different solutions, employing magnetic forces, ultrasonic standing waves, or hydrodynamic effects have been found over the past
[...] Read more.
Lab-on-a-chip immuno assays utilizing superparamagnetic beads as labels suffer from the fact that the majority of beads pass the sensing area without contacting the sensor surface. Different solutions, employing magnetic forces, ultrasonic standing waves, or hydrodynamic effects have been found over the past decades. The first category uses magnetic forces, created by on-chip conducting lines to attract beads towards the sensor surface. Modifications of the magnetic landscape allow for additional transport and separation of different bead species. The hydrodynamic approach uses changes in the channel geometry to enhance the capture volume. In acoustofluidics, ultrasonic standing waves force µm-sized particles onto a surface through radiation forces. As these approaches have their disadvantages, a new sensor concept that circumvents these problems is suggested. This concept is based on the granular giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect that can be found in gels containing magnetic nanoparticles. The proposed design could be realized in the shape of paper-based test strips printed with gel-based GMR sensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Biodetection and Drug Delivery)

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