Special Issue "Next-Generation Immunosensors"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2016)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Luigi Campanella

Department of Chemistry, University of Rome “Sapienza”, P.le A. Moro 5, Rome 00185, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: urban pollution; oxidative stress; cultural heritage; field effect transistor; integral toxicity

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Immunosensors are analytical devices based on the formation of antigen–antibody complexes, which are detected and converted to a signal, generally of an optical, electrochemical, or piezoelectric nature. Different trasducing mechanisms are employed in immunosensors, based on signal generation or on property changes, due to the formation of the antigen/antibody complex.

Immunosensors are considered a special type of biosensor, aiming at the detection of the presence of specific antibodies or antigens, and is particularly important in the case of diagnosis of deseases, and, further, is more significant when performed in remote areas, when lacking trained analysis or required facilities in underdeveloped countries, where carrying out immunoessays, such as ELISA (Enzyme linked Immunosorbent Assay), is not possible.

Different disciplines converge in an immunosensor: biology, chemistry, electronics, and the improvements can play on one or more of these three areas. Thus, the idea of a Special Issue on these kinds of devices is related to the willingness to contribute to the dissemination of new opportunities, able to monitor and, consequently, to fight epidemics and their spread.

Another aspect of possible innovations is represented by the possibility to extend the media to which these tools are applied. Commonly, they are body fluids, especially serum, where antibodies or antigens are determined; however, increasing interest concerns the detection of different analytes in diverse media, such as groundwater and vegetal samples.

Finally, a weakness of immunosensors is represented by their single use, because of the high stability of the antigen–antibody complex. Thus, regeneration of these devices appears to be a significant and relevant innovation.

Prof. Dr. Luigi Campanella
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-3
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Disposable Amperometric Immunosensor for the Determination of Human P53 Protein in Cell Lysates Using Magnetic Micro-Carriers
Biosensors 2016, 6(4), 56; doi:10.3390/bios6040056
Received: 27 September 2016 / Revised: 4 November 2016 / Accepted: 14 November 2016 / Published: 21 November 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1235 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
An amperometric magnetoimmunosensor for the determination of human p53 protein is described in this work using a sandwich configuration involving the covalent immobilization of a specific capture antibody onto activated carboxylic-modified magnetic beads (HOOC-MBs) and incubation of the modified MBs with a mixture
[...] Read more.
An amperometric magnetoimmunosensor for the determination of human p53 protein is described in this work using a sandwich configuration involving the covalent immobilization of a specific capture antibody onto activated carboxylic-modified magnetic beads (HOOC-MBs) and incubation of the modified MBs with a mixture of the target protein and horseradish peroxidase-labeled antibody (HRP-anti-p53). The resulting modified MBs are captured by a magnet placed under the surface of a disposable carbon screen-printed electrode (SPCE) and the amperometric responses are measured at −0.20 V (vs. an Ag pseudo-reference electrode), upon addition of hydroquinone (HQ) as a redox mediator and H2O2 as the enzyme substrate. The magnetoimmunosensing platform was successfully applied for the detection of p53 protein in different cell lysates without any matrix effect after a simple sample dilution. The results correlated accurately with those provided by a commercial ELISA kit, thus confirming the immunosensor as an attractive alternative for rapid and simple determination of this protein using portable and affordable instrumentation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Next-Generation Immunosensors)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Effects of Surface Epitope Coverage on the Sensitivity of Displacement Assays that Employ Modified Nanoparticles: Using Bisphenol A as a Model Analyte
Biosensors 2016, 6(3), 43; doi:10.3390/bios6030043
Received: 17 June 2016 / Revised: 21 July 2016 / Accepted: 29 July 2016 / Published: 8 August 2016
PDF Full-text (1127 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
With the ever-increasing use of nanoparticles in immunosensors, a fundamental study on the effect of epitope density is presented herein, with a small molecule epitope, on the performance of the displacement assay format in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Thiolated bisphenol A (BPA)
[...] Read more.
With the ever-increasing use of nanoparticles in immunosensors, a fundamental study on the effect of epitope density is presented herein, with a small molecule epitope, on the performance of the displacement assay format in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Thiolated bisphenol A (BPA) functionalized gold nanoparticles (cysBPAv-AuNPs) and specific anti-BPA antibodies are employed for this purpose. It is shown that the displacement of cysBPAv-AuNPs bound to the immobilized antibodies was influenced by both the avidity of bound cysBPAv-AuNPs and the concentration of free BPA to displace it. The importance of surface epitope density was that it changed the number of epitopes in close proximity to the antibody-binding site. This then influenced the avidity of cysBPAv-AuNPs bound to the immobilized antibody. Furthermore, the molar epitope concentration in an assay appears to affect the degree of antibody binding site saturation. Controlling surface epitope density of the functionalized nanoparticles and molar epitope concentration in an assay leads to a decrease of the concentration of free BPA required to displace the bound cysBPAv-AuNP, and hence better assay performance with regards to the D50 value and dynamic range in the displacement assay. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Next-Generation Immunosensors)
Figures

Open AccessArticle A Flow SPR Immunosensor Based on a Sandwich Direct Method
Biosensors 2016, 6(2), 22; doi:10.3390/bios6020022
Received: 2 March 2016 / Revised: 13 April 2016 / Accepted: 4 May 2016 / Published: 13 May 2016
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (2784 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this study, we report the development of an SPR (Surface Plasmon Resonance) immunosensor for the detection of ampicillin, operating under flow conditions. SPR sensors based on both direct (with the immobilization of the antibody) and competitive (with the immobilization of the antigen)
[...] Read more.
In this study, we report the development of an SPR (Surface Plasmon Resonance) immunosensor for the detection of ampicillin, operating under flow conditions. SPR sensors based on both direct (with the immobilization of the antibody) and competitive (with the immobilization of the antigen) methods did not allow the detection of ampicillin. Therefore, a sandwich-based sensor was developed which showed a good linear response towards ampicillin between 10−3 and 10−1 M, a measurement time of ≤20 min and a high selectivity both towards β-lactam antibiotics and antibiotics of different classes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Next-Generation Immunosensors)
Back to Top