Special Issue "Mental Illness in Children"

A special issue of Brain Sciences (ISSN 2076-3425).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2017)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Rosemary Sheehan

Department of Social Work, Monash University, Victoria 3145, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: mental health; child welfare and the law; children’s courts

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In this Special Issue of Brain Sciences, we will be discussing “Mental Illness in Children” from a range of  perspectives, exploring the prevalence and recognition of mental disorders in children, the types of disorders and approaches to meeting their needs, and the complexity and severity of mental health problems in children. We look to what models of care best respond to children’s needs, the identification and management of risk, and the expertise needed to appropriately and effectively intervene when children need mental health care. We will welcome articles describing the range of issues that impact on mental disorder in children; models of intervention implemented and evaluated; new data on prevalence and nature of disorder; and critical reviews on mental health problems and vulnerability. We look forward to your valuable contribution to this Special Issue for this journal.

Prof. Rosemary Sheehan
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Brain Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 650 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Mental health problems in children
  • Prevalence
  • Models of intervention
  • Evaluation of care
  • Emerging trends and needs

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial Mental Illness in Children: Childhood Illness and Supporting the Family
Brain Sci. 2017, 7(8), 97; doi:10.3390/brainsci7080097
Received: 3 August 2017 / Revised: 7 August 2017 / Accepted: 7 August 2017 / Published: 8 August 2017
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Abstract
Childhood is a stage of life that is filled with potential for development, and the early years of childhood see immense physical changes in growth; mastery over body functions like movement; the acquisition of language and cognitive development to understand their own and
[...] Read more.
Childhood is a stage of life that is filled with potential for development, and the early years of childhood see immense physical changes in growth; mastery over body functions like movement; the acquisition of language and cognitive development to understand their own and others’ thinking and reasoning; and the psychosocial development of trust in the world, comfort in the care they receive from parents and caregivers, and the sense of being secure in themselves that this engenders. [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Illness in Children)

Research

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Open AccessArticle Infants Investigated by the Child Welfare System: Exploring a Distinct Profile of Risks, Service Needs, and Referrals for Support in Ontario
Brain Sci. 2017, 7(8), 101; doi:10.3390/brainsci7080101
Received: 17 July 2017 / Revised: 2 August 2017 / Accepted: 8 August 2017 / Published: 12 August 2017
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Abstract
The science of early childhood development underscores that maltreatment and other adversities experienced during infancy heightens the risk for poor developmental and socio-emotional outcomes. Referrals to supportive services by the child welfare system are particularly critical during infancy given the rapidity of brain
[...] Read more.
The science of early childhood development underscores that maltreatment and other adversities experienced during infancy heightens the risk for poor developmental and socio-emotional outcomes. Referrals to supportive services by the child welfare system are particularly critical during infancy given the rapidity of brain development and infants’ sensitivity to their environment. The main objectives of the current study are to: (1) examine age-specific differences in clinical and case characteristics; (2) determine the factors associated with the service referral decision involving infants; and (3) explore the types of services families have been referred to at the conclusion of a maltreatment-related investigation. Using data from the Ontario Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect for 2013, descriptive analyses were conducted, as was a logistic regression to identify factors associated with the decision to refer families of infants to supportive services. Overall, the findings reveal that the profile of infants and their families differs distinctly from those of older children with respect to risks, service needs, and service referrals, although this is rarely reflected in child welfare practice and policy. Investigations involving infants were most likely to have a referral made to supportive services, least likely to have an infant functioning concern identified; most likely to have a primary caregiver risk factor identified; and, the greatest likelihood of experiencing economic hardship. Multiple risks, identified for the primary caregiver of the infant are correlated to referral decisions for infants. However, the needs of the infant are likely under-identified and require cross-sectorial collaboration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Illness in Children)
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