Special Issue "Cancer Cell Imaging"

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A special issue of Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2013)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Brigitta G. Baumert

Department of Radiation-Oncology, MediClin Robert Janker Clinic & University of Bonn Med. Centre, Cooperation Unit Neurooncology, Bonn, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: CNS tumors; sarcomas; pet imaging; new MRI imaging techniques introduced for radiation therapy; new international trials in primary and secondary brain tumors
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Shaker A. Mousa

The Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, 1 Discovery Drive (Room 238), Rensselaer, NY 12144, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +518-694-7397
Fax: +1 518-694 7567
Interests: pharmaceuticals, biopharmaceuticals, and diagnostics; nanomedicine; cardiovascular diseases; neurological disorders; hematology and oncology; biosimilar and nanosimilar; angiogenesis, inflammation, thrombosis, integrin and cell adhesion molecules; target identification, molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways; preclinical, clinical, marketing and post marketing studies; regulatory and ethical issues

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The role of Nanotechnology in Cancer Imaging uisng specific molecular targeted strategies for early detection, effective treatment and therapeutic mointoring Cancer cells have unique properties that can be exploited by nanoparticles. Guided by and/or in conjunction with molecular imaging technologies, nanoparticles can be targeted at cancer cells to detect, monitor disease, deliver drugs, such as chemotherapy and to treat through ablation. Nano-Targeting of specific cancer cell types could serve as an emerging molecular imaging technology for effective early detection (Imaging), targeted therapy, and therapeutic monitoring. Cancer imaging involves the use of molecular imaging probes to accurately diagnose, manage and treat many types of cancer, which can be enhanced with the use of various nanoparticles.  Tumor Imaging using existing platforms (MRI, PET, SPECT, CT, and others) might be enhanced with the use of Nano-probes in determining the stage and the precise locations of cancer to aid in surgery and other cancer treatments. Additionally, certain types of cancer the earlier it is detected the better are the chances of treating it effectively.
Nanotechnology based molecular imaging have the potential in enhancing the standard care for many types of cancer. Nano-Targeting based on molecular imaging would provide an effective and safe means of target-specific drug delivery. Cancer imaging would facilitate the followings: Identify Tumor Properties and Growth, Effective Treatment, and Treatment Monitoring. Nano-based Molecular imaging and therapy could bring us closer to personalized cancer treatment to optimize response and minimize toxicity. Potential uses of Nano-based molecular imaging biomarkers might provide surrogate endpoints, prognostic, and predictive biomarkers.

Technologies under development to be covered as well include: Optical imaging: For imaging gene expression; cell trafficking; therapeutic monitoring; the detection of ovarian cancer, malignant skin lesions, lymphoma, and intestinal adenoma; drug delivery and photoablation. Optical imaging is primarily used as a research tool although some applications are entering initial clinical testing. Targeted Ultrasound: Providing differential diagnoses of cancer, including breast, ovarian, head and neck, prostate, liver and pancreatic as well as drug delivery High-field MR spectroscopy: As an adjunct to breast MRI, distinguishing malignant from benign tissue; helping to differentiate between recurrent brain tumors and changes due to radiation treatments; and guiding radiation treatment of recurrent brain tumors and prostate cancer Diffusion Tensor Imaging: For diagnosing cerebral ischemia and investigating brain disorders including tumors. It measures the anisotropy of microscopic water molecules surrounding the brain's white matter fibers. Fusion imaging: Provides the ability to view molecular information within an anatomic context. This capability can be applied to PET, US, SPECT, MRI, MR spectroscopy and a growing range of optical technologies. Perfusion imaging: to differentiate betwen for example between tumor progression and pseudoprogression. This is of specific intererst in brain tumours. Imaging for radiation planning; imaging not only in the form of a planning CT but also PET-CT with different tumor related tracers and MRI is used for radiotherapy tumor definition but also for definition as a prognostic marker.

Dr. Brigitta G. Baumert
Dr. Shaker A. Mousa
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cancers is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 800 CHF (Swiss Francs).

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in Oncology
Cancers 2014, 6(4), 1821-1889; doi:10.3390/cancers6041821
Received: 30 April 2014 / Revised: 25 July 2014 / Accepted: 7 August 2014 / Published: 29 September 2014
Cited by 40 | PDF Full-text (1960 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Since its introduction in the early nineties as a promising functional imaging technique in the management of neoplastic disorders, FDG-PET, and subsequently FDG-PET/CT, has become a cornerstone in several oncologic procedures such as tumor staging and restaging, treatment efficacy assessment during or after
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Since its introduction in the early nineties as a promising functional imaging technique in the management of neoplastic disorders, FDG-PET, and subsequently FDG-PET/CT, has become a cornerstone in several oncologic procedures such as tumor staging and restaging, treatment efficacy assessment during or after treatment end and radiotherapy planning. Moreover, the continuous technological progress of image generation and the introduction of sophisticated software to use PET scan as a biomarker paved the way to calculate new prognostic markers such as the metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and the total amount of tumor glycolysis (TLG). FDG-PET/CT proved more sensitive than contrast-enhanced CT scan in staging of several type of lymphoma or in detecting widespread tumor dissemination in several solid cancers, such as breast, lung, colon, ovary and head and neck carcinoma. As a consequence the stage of patients was upgraded, with a change of treatment in 10%–15% of them. One of the most evident advantages of FDG-PET was its ability to detect, very early during treatment, significant changes in glucose metabolism or even complete shutoff of the neoplastic cell metabolism as a surrogate of tumor chemosensitivity assessment. This could enable clinicians to detect much earlier the effectiveness of a given antineoplastic treatment, as compared to the traditional radiological detection of tumor shrinkage, which usually takes time and occurs much later. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cancer Cell Imaging)
Open AccessReview Utility of MRI Diffusion Techniques in the Evaluation of Tumors of the Head and Neck
Cancers 2013, 5(3), 875-889; doi:10.3390/cancers5030875
Received: 19 April 2013 / Revised: 15 May 2013 / Accepted: 28 June 2013 / Published: 5 July 2013
Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (836 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The use of diffusion-weighted imaging in the head and neck is an increasingly used technique that requires adaptation of the acquisition parameters. Parallel imaging and emerging techniques such as IVIM are playing a new role. The main indications for performing DWI are tissue
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The use of diffusion-weighted imaging in the head and neck is an increasingly used technique that requires adaptation of the acquisition parameters. Parallel imaging and emerging techniques such as IVIM are playing a new role. The main indications for performing DWI are tissue characterization, nodal staging and therapy monitoring. Lower apparent diffusion coefficients have been reported in this region for malignant lesions such as SCC, lymphoma and metastatic lymph node, as opposed to higher ADC in benign lesions and lymph nodes. Follow-up and early response to treatment are reflected in an ADC increase in both primary tumor and nodal metastasis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cancer Cell Imaging)
Open AccessReview 99mTc-HYNIC-Annexin A5 in Oncology: Evaluating Efficacy of Anti-Cancer Therapies
Cancers 2013, 5(2), 550-568; doi:10.3390/cancers5020550
Received: 22 March 2013 / Revised: 13 April 2013 / Accepted: 10 May 2013 / Published: 15 May 2013
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (383 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Evaluation of efficacy of anti-cancer therapy is currently performed by anatomical imaging (e.g., MRI, CT). Structural changes, if present, become apparent 1–2 months after start of therapy. Cancer patients thus bear the risk to receive an ineffective treatment, whilst clinical trials take a
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Evaluation of efficacy of anti-cancer therapy is currently performed by anatomical imaging (e.g., MRI, CT). Structural changes, if present, become apparent 1–2 months after start of therapy. Cancer patients thus bear the risk to receive an ineffective treatment, whilst clinical trials take a long time to prove therapy response. Both patient and pharmaceutical industry could therefore profit from an early assessment of efficacy of therapy. Diagnostic methods providing information on a functional level, rather than a structural, could present the solution. Recent technological advances in molecular imaging enable in vivo imaging of biological processes. Since most anti-cancer therapies combat tumors by inducing apoptosis, imaging of apoptosis could offer an early assessment of efficacy of therapy. This review focuses on principles of and clinical experience with molecular imaging of apoptosis using Annexin A5, a widely accepted marker for apoptosis detection in vitro and in vivo in animal models. 99mTc-HYNIC-Annexin A5 in combination with SPECT has been probed in clinical studies to assess efficacy of chemo- and radiotherapy within 1–4 days after start of therapy. Annexin A5-based functional imaging of apoptosis shows promise to offer a personalized medicine approach, now primarily used in genome-based medicine, applicable to all cancer patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cancer Cell Imaging)

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