Special Issue "Advances in Cancer Chemoprevention"

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A special issue of Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2012)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Ross McKinnon (Website)

Flinders Centre for Innovation in Cancer, School of Medicine Flinders University, Sturt Road, Bedford Park, Australia

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Preclinical Cancer Chemoprevention Studies Using Animal Model of Inflammation-Associated Colorectal Carcinogenesis
Cancers 2012, 4(3), 673-700; doi:10.3390/cancers4030673
Received: 5 April 2012 / Revised: 14 June 2012 / Accepted: 6 July 2012 / Published: 16 July 2012
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (3441 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Inflammation is involved in all stages of carcinogenesis. Inflammatory bowel disease, such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease is a longstanding inflammatory disease of intestine with increased risk for colorectal cancer (CRC). Several molecular events involved in chronic inflammatory process are reported [...] Read more.
Inflammation is involved in all stages of carcinogenesis. Inflammatory bowel disease, such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease is a longstanding inflammatory disease of intestine with increased risk for colorectal cancer (CRC). Several molecular events involved in chronic inflammatory process are reported to contribute to multi-step carcinogenesis of CRC in the inflamed colon. They include over-production of free radicals, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, up-regulation of inflammatory enzymes in arachidonic acid biosynthesis pathway, up-regulation of certain cytokines, and intestinal immune system dysfunction. In this article, firstly I briefly introduce our experimental animal models where colorectal neoplasms rapidly develop in the inflamed colorectum. Secondary, data on preclinical cancer chemoprevention studies of inflammation-associated colon carcinogenesis by morin, bezafibrate, and valproic acid, using this novel inflammation-related colorectal carcinogenesis model is described. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Cancer Chemoprevention)

Review

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Open AccessReview The Role of Cyclic Nucleotide Signaling Pathways in Cancer: Targets for Prevention and Treatment
Cancers 2014, 6(1), 436-458; doi:10.3390/cancers6010436
Received: 18 December 2013 / Revised: 10 January 2014 / Accepted: 7 February 2014 / Published: 26 February 2014
Cited by 13 | PDF Full-text (575 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
For more than four decades, the cyclic nucleotides cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cyclic GMP (cGMP) have been recognized as important signaling molecules within cells. Under normal physiological conditions, cyclic nucleotides regulate a myriad of biological processes such as cell growth and adhesion, [...] Read more.
For more than four decades, the cyclic nucleotides cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cyclic GMP (cGMP) have been recognized as important signaling molecules within cells. Under normal physiological conditions, cyclic nucleotides regulate a myriad of biological processes such as cell growth and adhesion, energy homeostasis, neuronal signaling, and muscle relaxation. In addition, altered cyclic nucleotide signaling has been observed in a number of pathophysiological conditions, including cancer. While the distinct molecular alterations responsible for these effects vary depending on the specific cancer type, several studies have demonstrated that activation of cyclic nucleotide signaling through one of three mechanisms—induction of cyclic nucleotide synthesis, inhibition of cyclic nucleotide degradation, or activation of cyclic nucleotide receptors—is sufficient to inhibit proliferation and activate apoptosis in many types of cancer cells. These findings suggest that targeting cyclic nucleotide signaling can provide a strategy for the discovery of novel agents for the prevention and/or treatment of selected cancers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Cancer Chemoprevention)
Open AccessReview Chemoprevention of Breast Cancer: The Paradox of Evidence versus Advocacy Inaction
Cancers 2012, 4(4), 1146-1160; doi:10.3390/cancers4041146
Received: 31 July 2012 / Revised: 23 September 2012 / Accepted: 19 October 2012 / Published: 29 October 2012
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (506 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Women who are at high risk of breast cancer can be offered chemoprevention. Chemoprevention strategies have expanded over the past decade and include selective receptor modulator inhibitors and aromatase inhibitors. Physicians are expected to provide individualized risk assessments to identify high risk [...] Read more.
Women who are at high risk of breast cancer can be offered chemoprevention. Chemoprevention strategies have expanded over the past decade and include selective receptor modulator inhibitors and aromatase inhibitors. Physicians are expected to provide individualized risk assessments to identify high risk women who may be eligible for chemoprevention. It is prudent that physicians utilize a shared decision approach when counseling high risk women about their preventive options. Barriers and misperceptions however exist with patient and physician acceptance of chemoprevention and continue to impede uptake of chemoprevention as a strategy to reduce breast cancer risk. Programs to increase awareness and elucidate the barriers are critical for women to engage in cancer prevention and promote chemoprevention adherence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Cancer Chemoprevention)

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