Special Issue "TRP Channels in Health and Disease"

A special issue of Cells (ISSN 2073-4409).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Alexander Dietrich

Walther-Straub-Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat Munchen, Munich, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: TRP channels; lung physiology and pathophysiology; TRP-deficient mouse models; TRP modulators as therapeutic options

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels represent an extended family of 28 members fulfilling multiple roles in the living organism. Over the last few years, new findings on TRP channels reveal an exceptionally broad spectrum as cellular sensors and effectors. Body temperature control, transmitter release from neurons, mineral homeostasis, chemical sensing, and survival mechanisms in a challenging environment are only a few functions which are tightly controlled by these channels. More than 20 hereditary human diseases in areas as diverse as neurology, cardiology, pulmonology, nephrology, dermatology, and urology caused by mutations in 11 TRP genes emphasize their truly remarkable diversity and underscore their essential role in vivo. Moreover, TRP channels are important pharmacological targets for specific novel therapeutic treatment options for patients suffering from diseases caused by dysfunctional TRP proteins. Along these lines, specific TRP inhibitors and activators were identified in the lasts years and are now tested in vitro and in vivo. At the cellular level, TRP channels can be activated by diverse chemical and physical stimuli and are involved in the regulation of the influx of external Ca2+—a universal second messenger regulating diverse cellular functions. However, TRP proteins do not function in isolation, but are organized as structural and functional protein modules in complex signal transduction pathways to execute essential tasks of the cell which are still under investigation. This special issue of Cells will feature a collection of excellent review articles summarizing the current state of the art on TRP channel research with a main focus on TRP channel activation, their physiological and pathophysiological function, and their roles as pharmacological targets for future therapeutic options.

Prof. Dr. Alexander Dietrich
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • TRP channels
  • TRP function on an organismal, cellular, and molecular level
  • TRPs and pathophysiological function
  • TRP modulators as new therapeutic options

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Expression Profiling of the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid (TRPV) Channels 1, 2, 3 and 4 in Mucosal Epithelium of Human Ulcerative Colitis
Received: 30 April 2018 / Revised: 11 June 2018 / Accepted: 14 June 2018 / Published: 15 June 2018
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Abstract
The Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) family of selective and non-selective ion channels is well represented throughout the mammalian gastrointestinal track. Several members of the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid (TRPV) subfamily have been identified in contributing to modulation of mobility, secretion and sensitivity of
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The Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) family of selective and non-selective ion channels is well represented throughout the mammalian gastrointestinal track. Several members of the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid (TRPV) subfamily have been identified in contributing to modulation of mobility, secretion and sensitivity of the human intestine. Previous studies have focused on the detection of TRPV mRNA levels in colon tissue of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) whereas little information exists regarding TRPV channel expression in the colonic epithelium. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression levels of TRPV1, TRPV2, TRPV3 and TRPV4 in mucosa epithelial cells of colonic biopsies from patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) in comparison to colonic resections from non-IBD patients (control group). Immunohistochemistry, using specific antibodies and quantitative analyses of TRPV-immunostained epithelial cells, was performed in semi-serial sections of the samples. TRPV1 expression was significantly decreased whereas TRPV4 expression was significantly increased in the colonic epithelium of UC patients compared to patients in the control group (p < 0.05). No significant difference for TRPV2 and TRPV3 expression levels between UC and control specimens was detected (p > 0.05). There was no correlation between TRPV channel expression and the clinical features of the disease (p > 0.05). Further investigation is needed to clarify the role of TRPV channels in human bowel inflammatory response. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue TRP Channels in Health and Disease)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Role of the TRPM4 Channel in Cardiovascular Physiology and Pathophysiology
Received: 11 May 2018 / Revised: 11 June 2018 / Accepted: 14 June 2018 / Published: 15 June 2018
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Abstract
The transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily M member 4 (TRPM4) channel influences calcium homeostasis during many physiological activities such as insulin secretion, immune response, respiratory reaction, and cerebral vasoconstriction. This calcium-activated, monovalent, selective cation channel also plays a key role in cardiovascular
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The transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily M member 4 (TRPM4) channel influences calcium homeostasis during many physiological activities such as insulin secretion, immune response, respiratory reaction, and cerebral vasoconstriction. This calcium-activated, monovalent, selective cation channel also plays a key role in cardiovascular pathophysiology; for example, a mutation in the TRPM4 channel leads to cardiac conduction disease. Recently, it has been suggested that the TRPM4 channel is also involved in the development of cardiac ischemia-reperfusion injury, which causes myocardial infarction. In the present review, we discuss the physiological function of the TRPM4 channel, and assess its role in cardiovascular pathophysiology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue TRP Channels in Health and Disease)
Open AccessFeature PaperReview Remarkable Progress with Small-Molecule Modulation of TRPC1/4/5 Channels: Implications for Understanding the Channels in Health and Disease
Received: 27 April 2018 / Revised: 21 May 2018 / Accepted: 23 May 2018 / Published: 1 June 2018
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Abstract
Proteins of the TRPC family can form many homo- and heterotetrameric cation channels permeable to Na+, K+ and Ca2+. In this review, we focus on channels formed by the isoforms TRPC1, TRPC4 and TRPC5. We review evidence for
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Proteins of the TRPC family can form many homo- and heterotetrameric cation channels permeable to Na+, K+ and Ca2+. In this review, we focus on channels formed by the isoforms TRPC1, TRPC4 and TRPC5. We review evidence for the formation of different TRPC1/4/5 tetramers, give an overview of recently developed small-molecule TRPC1/4/5 activators and inhibitors, highlight examples of biological roles of TRPC1/4/5 channels in different tissues and pathologies, and discuss how high-quality chemical probes of TRPC1/4/5 modulators can be used to understand the involvement of TRPC1/4/5 channels in physiological and pathophysiological processes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue TRP Channels in Health and Disease)
Figures

Graphical abstract

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