Special Issue "Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine"

A special issue of Cells (ISSN 2073-4409).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2017)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Ilyas Singeç

Director, Stem Cell Translation Laboratory (SCTL), NIH Regenerative Medicine Program, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), 9800 Medical Center Drive, Rockville, MD 20892, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: cell reprogramming; iPS cells; cell differentiation; quantitative biology; high-throughput screening; cell therapy; tissue engineering; neurological and psychiatric diseases; personalized medicine

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) over a decade ago has transformed stem cell biology and biomedical research. The promise of the iPSC technology holds tremendous potential for disease modeling, drug discovery, predictive toxicology, and regenerative medicine applications. As progress is being made, there is strong interest in addressing the immediate translational challenges and knowledge gaps in order to bring iPSC-based therapeutics closer to patients. In particular, comprehensive approaches and tangible solutions are needed for establishing and disseminating quality control standards for safety, reproducibility, and scalable cell differentiation. Careful molecular studies ranging from epigenetic, genetic, proteomic, and metabolic analyses are of importance in order to better understand iPSC biology in comparison to embryonic stem cells and other cell types. This Special Issue will focus on basic and translational iPSC research for improved characterization and elucidation of patient- and disease-specific cells during pluripotency, differentiation, and application in vitro and in vivo.

Dr. Ilyas Singeç
Guest Editor

 

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cells is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • pluripotency
  • iPS cell
  • embryonic stem cells
  • cell differentiation
  • molecular characterization
  • disease modeling
  • cell replacement
  • drug screening
  • cell maturation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview Use of Human Neurons Derived via Cellular Reprogramming Methods to Study Host-Parasite Interactions of Toxoplasma gondii in Neurons
Cells 2017, 6(4), 32; doi:10.3390/cells6040032
Received: 13 August 2017 / Revised: 12 September 2017 / Accepted: 22 September 2017 / Published: 23 September 2017
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Abstract
Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular protozoan parasite, with approximately one-third of the worlds’ population chronically infected. In chronically infected individuals, the parasite resides in tissue cysts in neurons in the brain. The chronic infection in immunocompetant individuals has traditionally been considered to be
[...] Read more.
Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular protozoan parasite, with approximately one-third of the worlds’ population chronically infected. In chronically infected individuals, the parasite resides in tissue cysts in neurons in the brain. The chronic infection in immunocompetant individuals has traditionally been considered to be asymptomatic, but increasing evidence indicates that chronic infection is associated with diverse neurological disorders such as schizophrenia, cryptogenic epilepsy, and Parkinson’s Disease. The mechanisms by which the parasite exerts affects on behavior and other neuronal functions are not understood. Human neurons derived from cellular reprogramming methods offer the opportunity to develop better human neuronal models to study T. gondii in neurons. Results from two studies using human neurons derived via cellular reprogramming methods indicate these human neuronal models provide better in vitro models to study the effects of T. gondii on neurons and neurological functions. In this review, an overview of the current neural reprogramming methods will be given, followed by a summary of the studies using human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived neurons and induced neurons (iNs) to study T. gondii in neurons. The potential of these neural reprogramming methods for further study of the host-parasite interactions of T. gondii in neurons will be discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview Stem Cell Therapies in Retinal Disorders
Cells 2017, 6(1), 4; doi:10.3390/cells6010004
Received: 29 November 2016 / Accepted: 19 January 2017 / Published: 2 February 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (203 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Stem cell therapy has long been considered a promising mode of treatment for retinal conditions. While human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have provided the precedent for regenerative medicine, the development of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) revolutionized this field. iPSCs allow for the
[...] Read more.
Stem cell therapy has long been considered a promising mode of treatment for retinal conditions. While human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have provided the precedent for regenerative medicine, the development of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) revolutionized this field. iPSCs allow for the development of many types of retinal cells, including those of the retinal pigment epithelium, photoreceptors, and ganglion cells, and can model polygenic diseases such as age-related macular degeneration. Cellular programming and reprogramming technology is especially useful in retinal diseases, as it allows for the study of living cells that have genetic variants that are specific to patients’ diseases. Since iPSCs are a self-renewing resource, scientists can experiment with an unlimited number of pluripotent cells to perfect the process of targeted differentiation, transplantation, and more, for personalized medicine. Challenges in the use of stem cells are present from the scientific, ethical, and political realms. These include transplant complications leading to anatomically incorrect placement, concern for tumorigenesis, and incomplete targeting of differentiation leading to contamination by different types of cells. Despite these limitations, human ESCs and iPSCs specific to individual patients can revolutionize the study of retinal disease and may be effective therapies for conditions currently considered incurable. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine)

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Stem Cells Therapies in Retinal Disorders
Authors: Aakriti Garg, MD 1, Jin Yang, MD 1,2, Stephen H. Tsang, MD, PhD 1,2
Affiliations: 1 Barbara and Donald Jonas Laboratory of Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine, and Bernard and Shirlee Brown Glaucoma Laboratory, Department of Ophthalmology, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA

2 Pathology & Cell Biology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY, USA
AbstractStem cell therapy has long been considered a promising mode of treatment for retinal conditions. While human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were once considered a promising source of stem cells in regenerative medicine, the development of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) revolutionized this field. IPSCs allow for the development of many types of retinal cells, including those of the retinal pigment epithelium, photoreceptors, and ganglion cells. They also play a significant role in modeling polygenic diseases such as age-related macular degeneration. Cellular programming and reprogramming technology is especially useful in retinal diseases as it allows for the study of living cells that have genetic variants that are specific to patients’ specific diseases. Since iPSCs are a self-renewing resource, scientists can experiment with an unlimited number of pluripotent cells to perfect the process of targeted differentiation, transplantation, and more for personalized medicine. Challenges in the use of stem cells are present from the scientific, ethical, and political realms. These include transplant complications leading to anatomically incorrect placement, concern for tumorigenesis from undifferentiated cells, and incomplete targeting of differentiation leading to contamination by different types of cells. Despite these limitations, human ESCs and iPSCs specific to individual patients are a beneficial tool for the study of retinal disease and may be effective therapies for conditions currently considered incurable.

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