Special Issue "Advances in Multifunctional Coatings for Next Generation Applications"

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A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Santanu Chaudhuri

Illinois Applied Research Institute, College of Engineering, University of Illinois, 2100 South Oak Street, Suite 206, Champaign, IL 61820, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +1 217 300 9419
Interests: multifunctional coatings design; wear-resistant coatings; chem/bio active surfaces; electrochemical reactions; catalysis; fuel-cell; hydrogen storage

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The special issue is dedicated to highlighting the important advances in coatings technology that promises to transform the commercial coatings of today. New ways to design coatings including novel synthesis and application, assembly of block copolymers, characterization of interfaces, and multiscale simulation methods for coatings design, all have contributed to the tremendous insight on how coatings interact with the environment. The thermodynamics of coating interfaces, morphological features, and the role of chemical constituents can now be directly measured from nano-to-microscale using novel instrumentation. There is still a gap that needs to be addressed where innovative multifunctional coatings for a range of potential applications can mature to become commercial products in next 5-10 year time-horizon. Therefore, innovative research from academia and industry needs to find a common platform where new ideas on coating synthesis, curing, characterization, and multiscale modeling can be combined to develop multifunctional coatings with greater degree of control and scalability. In particular, unique mechanical and chemical properties, scratch resistance, self-healing properties, anti-icing and super-hydrophobic coatings, and conductive coatings are at the forefront of becoming new products. The issue aimed to publish articles from leaders in multifunctional coatings research in academia and industry, and highlight the advances and potential challenges for the sustainable design of multifunction coatings.

Dr. Santanu Chaudhuri
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 300 CHF (Swiss Francs). English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Laboratory and Field Studies of Poly(2,5-bis(N-methyl-N-hexylamino)phenylene vinylene) (BAM-PPV): A Potential Wash Primer Replacement for Army Military Vehicles
Coatings 2014, 4(3), 687-700; doi:10.3390/coatings4030687
Received: 13 June 2014 / Revised: 8 August 2014 / Accepted: 21 August 2014 / Published: 15 September 2014
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Abstract
In this study, an electroactive polymer (EAP), poly(2,5-bis(N-methyl-N- hexylamino)phenylene vinylene) (BAM-PPV), was tested as an alternative to current hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI))-based Army wash primers. BAM-PPV was tested in both laboratory and field studies to determine its adhesive and corrosion-inhibiting
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In this study, an electroactive polymer (EAP), poly(2,5-bis(N-methyl-N- hexylamino)phenylene vinylene) (BAM-PPV), was tested as an alternative to current hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI))-based Army wash primers. BAM-PPV was tested in both laboratory and field studies to determine its adhesive and corrosion-inhibiting properties when applied to steel and aluminum alloys. The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) tests showed that BAM-PPV combined with an epoxy primer and the Army chemical agent-resistant coating (CARC) topcoat met Army performance requirements for military coatings. After successful laboratory testing, the BAM-PPV was then field tested for one year at the Aberdeen Test Center (ATC). This field testing showed that BAM-PPV incorporated into the Army military coating survived with no delamination of the coating and only minor corrosion on the chip sites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Multifunctional Coatings for Next Generation Applications)
Open AccessArticle Completely Analytical Tools for the Next Generation of Surface and Coating Optimization
Coatings 2014, 4(2), 253-281; doi:10.3390/coatings4020253
Received: 14 March 2014 / Revised: 9 April 2014 / Accepted: 15 April 2014 / Published: 23 April 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1583 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Usually, some severe efforts are required to obtain tribological parameters like Archard’s wear depth parameter kd. Complex tribological experiments have to be performed and analyzed. The paper features an approach where such parameters are extracted from effective interaction potentials in combination
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Usually, some severe efforts are required to obtain tribological parameters like Archard’s wear depth parameter kd. Complex tribological experiments have to be performed and analyzed. The paper features an approach where such parameters are extracted from effective interaction potentials in combination with more physical-oriented measurements, such as Nanoindentation and physical scratch. Thereby, the effective potentials are built up and fed from such tests. By using effective material potentials one can derive critical loading situations leading to failure (decomposition strength) for any contact situation. A subsequent connection of these decomposition or failure states with the corresponding stress or strain distributions allows the development of rather comprehensive tribological parameter models, applicable in wear and fatigue simulations, as demonstrated in this work. From this, a new relatively general wear model has been developed on the basis of the effective indenter concept by using the extended Hertzian approach for a great variety of loading situations. The models do not only allow to analyze certain tribological experiments, such as the well known pin-on disk test or the more recently developed nano-fretting test, but also to forward simulate such tests and even give hints for structured optimization or result in better component life-time prediction. The work will show how the procedure has to be applied in general and a small selection of practical examples will be presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Multifunctional Coatings for Next Generation Applications)
Open AccessArticle Computational Tools and Approaches for Design and Control of Coating and Composite Color, Appearance, and Electromagnetic Signature
Coatings 2013, 3(2), 59-81; doi:10.3390/coatings3020059
Received: 27 November 2012 / Revised: 10 February 2013 / Accepted: 3 April 2013 / Published: 11 April 2013
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Abstract
The transport behavior of electromagnetic radiation through a polymeric coating or composite is the basis for the material color, appearance, and overall electromagnetic signature. As multifunctional materials become more advanced and next generation in-service applications become more demanding, a need for predictive design
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The transport behavior of electromagnetic radiation through a polymeric coating or composite is the basis for the material color, appearance, and overall electromagnetic signature. As multifunctional materials become more advanced and next generation in-service applications become more demanding, a need for predictive design of electromagnetic signature is desired. This paper presents various components developed and used in a computational suite for the study and design of electromagnetic radiation transport properties in polymeric coatings and composites. Focus is given to the treatment of the forward or direct scattering problem on surfaces and in bulk matrices of polymeric materials. The suite consists of surface and bulk light scattering simulation modules that may be coupled together to produce a multiscale model for predicting the electromagnetic signature of various material systems. Geometric optics ray tracing is used to predict surface scattering behavior of realistically rough surfaces, while a coupled ray tracing-finite element approach is used to predict bulk scattering behavior of material matrices consisting of microscale and nanoscale fillers, pigments, fibers, air voids, and other inclusions. Extension of the suite to color change and appearance metamerism is addressed, as well as the differences between discrete versus statistical material modeling. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Multifunctional Coatings for Next Generation Applications)
Open AccessArticle Nano-Impact (Fatigue) Characterization of As-Deposited Amorphous Nitinol Thin Film
Coatings 2012, 2(3), 195-209; doi:10.3390/coatings2030195
Received: 14 June 2012 / Revised: 8 August 2012 / Accepted: 13 August 2012 / Published: 31 August 2012
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (676 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper presents nano-impact (low cycle fatigue) behavior of as-deposited amorphous nitinol (TiNi) thin film deposited on Si wafer. The nitinol film was 3.5 µm thick and was deposited by the sputtering process. Nano-impact tests were conducted to comprehend the localized fatigue performance
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This paper presents nano-impact (low cycle fatigue) behavior of as-deposited amorphous nitinol (TiNi) thin film deposited on Si wafer. The nitinol film was 3.5 µm thick and was deposited by the sputtering process. Nano-impact tests were conducted to comprehend the localized fatigue performance and failure modes of thin film using a calibrated nano-indenter NanoTest™, equipped with standard diamond Berkovich and conical indenter in the load range of 0.5 mN to 100 mN. Each nano-impact test was conducted for a total of 1000 fatigue cycles. Depth sensing approach was adapted to understand the mechanisms of film failure. Based on the depth-time data and surface observations of films using atomic force microscope, it is concluded that the shape of the indenter test probe is critical in inducing the localized indentation stress and film failure. The measurement technique proposed in this paper can be used to optimize the design of nitinol thin films. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Multifunctional Coatings for Next Generation Applications)

Review

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Open AccessReview An Overview of the Scratch Resistance of Automotive Coatings: Exterior Clearcoats and Polycarbonate Hardcoats
Coatings 2012, 2(4), 221-234; doi:10.3390/coatings2040221
Received: 17 September 2012 / Revised: 23 October 2012 / Accepted: 1 November 2012 / Published: 12 November 2012
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (598 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The scratch resistance of coatings used on two highly visible automotive applications (automotive bodies and window glazings) were examined and reviewed. Types of damage (scratch vs. mar), the impact on customers, and the causes of scratch events were investigated. Different exterior clearcoat technologies,
[...] Read more.
The scratch resistance of coatings used on two highly visible automotive applications (automotive bodies and window glazings) were examined and reviewed. Types of damage (scratch vs. mar), the impact on customers, and the causes of scratch events were investigated. Different exterior clearcoat technologies, including UV curable and self-healing formulations were reviewed, including results from nano- and macro-scratch tests. Polycarbonate hardcoat glazings were tested vs. annealed glass samples using a Taber abraser, with the resulting damage analyzed using transmitted haze measurements and optical profilometry. A correlation between the damage seen in glass samples (many smooth, shallow mars) and the best hardcoat samples (fewer, deeper scratches) and the haze measurements was discussed. Nano-scratch results showed similar fracture forces, but measurably improved mar resistance for the hardcoats/glass system compared to exterior clearcoats. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Multifunctional Coatings for Next Generation Applications)

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