Special Issue "Green Cosmetic Ingredients"

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A special issue of Cosmetics (ISSN 2079-9284).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Carla Villa

Professor of Cosmetic Chemistry, DIFAR - Department of Pharmacy, Section of Drug and Cosmetic Chemistry, Viale Benedetto XV, 3, 16132 Genova, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 00390103538355
Interests: green cosmetic chemistry, microwave extractions, cosmetic ingredients, ecofriendly synthesis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue, “Green Cosmetic Ingredients,” deals with all aspects of "greeness" in cosmetics, from natural sources to ecofriendly chemical processes. This broad range of topics recognizes that green does not necessarily mean natural.

To "think green" in a cosmetic context, we have to replace the presently unspecific demand for "natural" by a systematic approach to analyze, quantify, and then minimize the environmental/resource-depleting impact of each ingredient. Ingredients are not "greener", "safer", or "more efficacious" simply because they come from some plant. However, ingredients are "green" when all details of sourcing, manufacturing, disposal (including information concerning energy and water use, as well as eco- and human toxicity) are taken into account. This is true even if "chemical steps" are involved. Synthetics can be green as long as they have been produced following Green Chemistry principles.

In addition to papers that focus directly on the synthesis, extraction, and preparation of cosmetic ingredients, studies dealing with the fundamental aspects of their safety (such as in vitro assays) will also be considered.

Prof. Dr. Carla Villa
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cosmetics is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. For the first couple of issues the Article Processing Charge (APC) will be waived for well-prepared manuscripts. English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Keywords

  • Green cosmetic chemistry
  • ecosustainable cosmetics
  • green formulations
  • ecofriendly procedures
  • solvent-free synthesis
  • mild conditions
  • bioactive compounds
  • botanical extracts

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Green Cosmetic Surfactant from Rice: Characterization and Application
Cosmetics 2015, 2(4), 322-341; doi:10.3390/cosmetics2040322
Received: 5 May 2015 / Revised: 14 September 2015 / Accepted: 23 September 2015 / Published: 10 October 2015
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Abstract
During recent years, microwave irradiation has been extensively used for performing green organic synthesis. The aim of this study was to synthesize, through a microwave-assisted irradiation process, a natural surfactant with O/W emulsifying properties. Our attention was focused on polyglycerol esters of fatty
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During recent years, microwave irradiation has been extensively used for performing green organic synthesis. The aim of this study was to synthesize, through a microwave-assisted irradiation process, a natural surfactant with O/W emulsifying properties. Our attention was focused on polyglycerol esters of fatty acids that are biocompatible and biodegradable non-ionic surfactants widely used in food and cosmetic products. The emulsifier was obtained using vegetable raw material from renewable sources: polyglycerol derived from vegetable glycerol and rice bran oil fatty acids. The natural emulsifier obtained was then characterized and evaluated for its emulsifying properties using different doses, oil phases, rheological additives, waxes, etc. The potential application in solar products, in comparison with other natural emulsifiers, was also evaluated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Cosmetic Ingredients)
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Open AccessArticle Effects of Lipids and Emulsifiers on the Physicochemical and Sensory Properties of Cosmetic Emulsions Containing Vitamin E
Cosmetics 2015, 2(1), 35-47; doi:10.3390/cosmetics2010035
Received: 31 December 2014 / Accepted: 6 March 2015 / Published: 18 March 2015
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1205 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Sensory properties are fundamental in determining the success of a cosmetic product. In this work, we assessed the influence of different oils and emulsifiers on the physicochemical and sensory properties of anti-ageing cosmetic O/W emulsions containing vitamin E acetate as active ingredient. No
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Sensory properties are fundamental in determining the success of a cosmetic product. In this work, we assessed the influence of different oils and emulsifiers on the physicochemical and sensory properties of anti-ageing cosmetic O/W emulsions containing vitamin E acetate as active ingredient. No clear correlation between physicochemical properties and sensory characteristics was evidenced. Sensorial evaluation of these formulations pointed out that the emulsifier systems affected the perceived oiliness and absorbency during application of the product, thus influencing its acceptance. These results suggest the need for more detailed studies on the physicochemical factors involved in determining the consumers’ acceptance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Cosmetic Ingredients)
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Open AccessArticle Green Polymers in Personal Care Products: Rheological Properties of Tamarind Seed Polysaccharide
Cosmetics 2015, 2(1), 1-10; doi:10.3390/cosmetics2010001
Received: 11 November 2014 / Accepted: 17 December 2014 / Published: 23 December 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (3226 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Tamarind seed polysaccharide (TSP) is a xyloglucan of vegetable origin, recently proposed for the cosmetic and pharmaceutical market as a “green” alternative to hyaluronic acid. In this study, TSP water dispersions, at different concentrations, were characterized by means of rheological measurements, both in
[...] Read more.
Tamarind seed polysaccharide (TSP) is a xyloglucan of vegetable origin, recently proposed for the cosmetic and pharmaceutical market as a “green” alternative to hyaluronic acid. In this study, TSP water dispersions, at different concentrations, were characterized by means of rheological measurements, both in continuous and oscillatory flow conditions. The results were compared with those of hyaluronic acid of two different molecular weights. The results pointed out the close rheological behaviors between TSP and hyaluronic acid with comparable molecular weight. Afterwards, the structural features of binary and ternary polysaccharide associations prepared with TSP, hyaluronic acid (very high MW) and dehydropolysaccharide gum, a modified xanthan gum, with high stabilizing properties, were investigated. The rheological properties were significantly affected by the polysaccharide ratios in the mixture, suggesting that the combination of TSP with other polymers can lead to a modulation of the texture and functional properties of cosmetics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Cosmetic Ingredients)
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Open AccessArticle In Vitro Cytotoxicity and Phototoxicity Assessment of Acylglutamate Surfactants Using a Human Keratinocyte Cell Line
Cosmetics 2014, 1(3), 159-170; doi:10.3390/cosmetics1030159
Received: 19 April 2014 / Revised: 17 June 2014 / Accepted: 7 July 2014 / Published: 14 July 2014
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1569 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In the current study, human keratinocyte cell line was used as in vitro cell culture model to elucidate the effects of the fatty acid chain length of acylglutamate (amino acid-based surfactant) namely, sodium cocoyl glutamate, sodium lauroyl glutamate, and sodium myristoyl glutamate on
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In the current study, human keratinocyte cell line was used as in vitro cell culture model to elucidate the effects of the fatty acid chain length of acylglutamate (amino acid-based surfactant) namely, sodium cocoyl glutamate, sodium lauroyl glutamate, and sodium myristoyl glutamate on their cytotoxicity and the ultraviolet B induced phototoxicity. The endpoint used to assess toxicity was a tetrazolium-based assay whereas, the phototoxic potential of acylglutamate surfactants was predicted using two models namely, the Photo-Irritation Factor and Mean Photo Effect. The results of this study showed that the fatty acid chain length of acylglutamate greatly influences toxic effects on human keratinocyte cells. In addition, all the acylglutamate surfactants tested on human keratinocyte cells demonstrated significantly less cytotoxicity (when irradiated and non-irradiated with ultraviolet B light; p < 0.05) and no phototoxic potential was observed in any of the acylglutamate surfactants, when compared with the positive control chlorpromazine. In conclusion, the in vitro studies confirm the suitability of sodium lauroyl glutamate destined for the synthesis and stabilization of lipid nanoparticles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Cosmetic Ingredients)
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Review

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Open AccessReview New Trends in Cosmetics: By-Products of Plant Origin and Their Potential Use as Cosmetic Active Ingredients
Cosmetics 2015, 2(2), 82-92; doi:10.3390/cosmetics2020082
Received: 13 February 2015 / Revised: 25 March 2015 / Accepted: 10 April 2015 / Published: 16 April 2015
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (666 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In recent years, the amount of waste deriving from industrial processes has increased substantially. Many industries produce different types of disposable by-products, rich in valuable compounds. Their characterization and valorization could not only convert them into high value products with application in diverse
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In recent years, the amount of waste deriving from industrial processes has increased substantially. Many industries produce different types of disposable by-products, rich in valuable compounds. Their characterization and valorization could not only convert them into high value products with application in diverse biotechnological fields, such as Pharmaceutics, Food or Cosmetics, but would also reduce the waste environmental impact and the related treatment costs. There are many examples of cosmetic active ingredients deriving from fish, meat and dairy products, but in the present review we would like to focus on the potentialities and the current use of compounds and extracts deriving from agronomical disposable wastes in the cosmetic field. These types of products are effective, inexpensive and bio-sustainable, and thus represent a valid alternative to the regular plant derived extracts, more commonly adopted in cosmetic formulations. Moreover, if the waste products come from organic farming, they are certainly an even more valuable source of safe extracts for Cosmetics, since they lack any residual pesticide or potentially toxic chemical. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Cosmetic Ingredients)

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