Special Issue "Carbon Nanostructures"

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A special issue of Crystals (ISSN 2073-4352).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2015)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Daniele Gozzi (Website)

Reactivity of Inorganic Materials Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Sapienza University of Rome, P.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Roma - BOX 34 - Roma 62, Italy
Interests: Thermodynamics of carbon nanostructures; High temperature chemical thermodynamics; Synthesis and characterization of CNTs; Nanostructured semiconductors for photovoltaics; Dye Sensitized Solar Cells; Solid State electrochemistry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue will bring together peer-reviewed articles and reviews discussing state of the art fundamental carbon nanostructures: nanodiamonds, fullerenes, nanotubes, nanorods, nanoonions, etc., as well as their syntheses, characterization, and applications. Especially appreciated are contributions discussing carbon phase diagrams at the nanoscale and theoretical and experimental studies concerning the relative stability of different forms of carbon at the nanoscale.

Prof. Dr. Daniele Gozzi
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Crystals is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 800 CHF (Swiss Francs).


Keywords

  • carbon;
  • nanodiamond;
  • fullerene;
  • carbon nanotubes;
  • carbon nanorods;
  • carbon nanoonions

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle High-Yield Synthesis of Helical Carbon Nanofibers Using Iron Oxide Fine Powder as a Catalyst
Crystals 2015, 5(1), 47-60; doi:10.3390/cryst5010047
Received: 15 September 2014 / Accepted: 22 December 2014 / Published: 8 January 2015
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (1107 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Carbon nanocoil (CNC), which is synthesized by a catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) method, has a coil diameter of 300–900 nm and a length of several tens of μm. Although it is very small, CNC is predicted to have a high mechanical [...] Read more.
Carbon nanocoil (CNC), which is synthesized by a catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) method, has a coil diameter of 300–900 nm and a length of several tens of μm. Although it is very small, CNC is predicted to have a high mechanical strength and hence is expected to have a use in nanodevices such as electromagnetic wave absorbers and field emitters. For nanodevice applications, it is necessary to synthesize CNC in high yield and purity. In this study, we improved the conditions of catalytic layer formation and CCVD. Using optimized CVD conditions, a CNC layer with a thickness of >40 μm was grown from a SnO2/Fe2O3/SnO2 catalyst on a substrate, and its purity increased to 81% ± 2%. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Nanostructures)
Open AccessArticle Growth and Properties of Carbon Microcoils and Nanocoils
Crystals 2014, 4(4), 466-489; doi:10.3390/cryst4040466
Received: 26 September 2014 / Revised: 2 November 2014 / Accepted: 18 November 2014 / Published: 26 November 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (23433 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Various types of coiled carbon filaments have been synthesized using chemical vapor deposition and other methods. These carbon filaments exhibit unique electrical and mechanical properties due to their versatile shapes and structures. To form coiled shapes, different types of catalyst compositions and [...] Read more.
Various types of coiled carbon filaments have been synthesized using chemical vapor deposition and other methods. These carbon filaments exhibit unique electrical and mechanical properties due to their versatile shapes and structures. To form coiled shapes, different types of catalyst compositions and reactive gases have been explored. Generally, coiled carbon filaments are classified by coil diameter and shape (e.g., microcoil and nanocoil). In this review, coiled carbon filaments are classified into three growth mechanism categories: (1) bidirectional double helical growth; (2) bidirectional twisted growth; and (3) tip single helical or twisted growth. Next, their synthesis methods and hypothetical growth mechanisms are discussed. Then, their electrical and mechanical properties are listed. Finally, potential applications and uses of coiled carbon filament are mentioned. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Nanostructures)
Open AccessArticle Dialytic Separation of Bundled, Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes from Carbonaceous Impurities
Crystals 2014, 4(4), 450-465; doi:10.3390/cryst4040450
Received: 2 July 2014 / Revised: 31 October 2014 / Accepted: 7 November 2014 / Published: 20 November 2014
PDF Full-text (1575 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Separating functionalized single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) from functionalized amorphous carbon is challenging, due to their polydispersity and similar physicochemical properties. We describe a single-step, dialytic separation method that takes advantage of the ability of heavily functionalized SWCNTs to bundle in a polar [...] Read more.
Separating functionalized single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) from functionalized amorphous carbon is challenging, due to their polydispersity and similar physicochemical properties. We describe a single-step, dialytic separation method that takes advantage of the ability of heavily functionalized SWCNTs to bundle in a polar environment while maintaining their solubility. Experiments on functionalized SWCNTs were compared with functionalized, C60 fullerenes (buckyballs) to probe the general applicability of the method and further characterize the bundling process. This approach may simultaneously be used to purify a functionalization reaction mixture of unreacted small molecules and of residual solvents, such as dimethylformamide. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Nanostructures)
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Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Dispersability of Carbon Nanotubes in Biopolymer-Based Fluids
Crystals 2015, 5(1), 74-90; doi:10.3390/cryst5010074
Received: 30 September 2014 / Accepted: 19 December 2014 / Published: 16 January 2015
PDF Full-text (378 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this review the dispersability of carbon nanotubes in aqueous solutions containing proteins, or nucleic acids, is discussed. Data reported previously are complemented by unpublished ones. In the mentioned nanotube-based systems several different phases are observed, depending on the type and concentration [...] Read more.
In this review the dispersability of carbon nanotubes in aqueous solutions containing proteins, or nucleic acids, is discussed. Data reported previously are complemented by unpublished ones. In the mentioned nanotube-based systems several different phases are observed, depending on the type and concentration of biopolymer, as well as the amount of dispersed nanotubes. The phase behavior depends on how much biopolymers are adsorbing, and, naturally, on the molecular details of the adsorbents. Proper modulation of nanotube/biopolymer interactions helps switching between repulsive and attractive regimes. Dispersion or phase separation take place, respectively, and the formation of liquid crystalline phases or gels may prevail with respect to dispersions. We report on systems containing ss-DNA- and lysozyme-stabilized nanotubes, representative of different organization modes. In the former case, ss-DNA rolls around CNTs and ensures complete coverage. Conversely, proteins randomly and non-cooperatively adsorb onto nanotubes. The two functionalization mechanisms are significantly different. A fine-tuning of temperature, added polymer, pH, and/or ionic strength conditions induces the formation of a given supra-molecular organization mode. The biopolymer physico-chemical properties are relevant to induce the formation of different phases made of carbon nanotubes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Nanostructures)
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