Special Issue "Semiconductor Nanocrystals"

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A special issue of Crystals (ISSN 2073-4352).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Alberta Bonanni

Institute for Semiconductor and Solid State Physics, Johannes Kepler University, Altenbergerstr. 69, A4040 Linz, Austria
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +43 732 2468 9664
Fax: +43 732 2468 9696
Interests: crystal growth; synchrotron radiation-based characterization techniques; advanced microscopy; magnetic semiconductors; III-V semiconductors; spintronics

Special Issue Information

Submission

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Keywords

  • embedded nanocrystals
  • nanocrystals formation
  • magnetic nanocrystals
  • (nano)characterization of nanocrystals
  • magnetization of single nanocrystals
  • functionalities of nanocrystals
  • phase diagrams of nanocrystals in a semiconducting host

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Electric Field Effects on Photoluminescence of CdSe Nanoparticles in a PMMA Film
Crystals 2014, 4(2), 152-167; doi:10.3390/cryst4020152
Received: 8 April 2014 / Revised: 4 June 2014 / Accepted: 6 June 2014 / Published: 23 June 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (857 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
External electric field effects on spectra and decay of photoluminescence (PL) as well as on absorption spectra were measured for CdSe nanoparticles in a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) film. Electrophotoluminescence (E-PL) spectra as well as electroabsorption spectra show a remarkable Stark shift which depends
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External electric field effects on spectra and decay of photoluminescence (PL) as well as on absorption spectra were measured for CdSe nanoparticles in a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) film. Electrophotoluminescence (E-PL) spectra as well as electroabsorption spectra show a remarkable Stark shift which depends on the particle size, indicating a large electric dipole moment in the first exciton state. The E-PL spectra also show that PL of CdSe is quenched by application of electric fields, and the magnitude of the field-induced quenching becomes larger with increasing size. The PL decay profiles observed in the absence and presence of electric field show that the field-induced quenching of PL mainly originates from the field-induced decrease in population of the emitting state prepared through the relaxation from the photoexcited state. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Semiconductor Nanocrystals)
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Open AccessArticle Growth Mechanisms of CdS Nanocrystals in Aqueous Media
Crystals 2012, 2(2), 618-626; doi:10.3390/cryst2020618
Received: 7 December 2011 / Revised: 16 May 2012 / Accepted: 23 May 2012 / Published: 6 June 2012
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (789 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
CdS nanocrystals were prepared in water-in-oil microemulsions. The nanocrystal properties, absorption and luminescence spectra and size distributions, were monitored at different times after mixing the microemulsions of the two precursors to obtain information on their growth mechanism. In particular, CdS nanocrystals were prepared
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CdS nanocrystals were prepared in water-in-oil microemulsions. The nanocrystal properties, absorption and luminescence spectra and size distributions, were monitored at different times after mixing the microemulsions of the two precursors to obtain information on their growth mechanism. In particular, CdS nanocrystals were prepared using water-in-heptane or water-in-nonane microemulsions. The results obtained from the investigation of nanocrystals prepared using heptane as the organic phase, confirmed that nanocrystal nucleation is fast while their growth is determined by droplet exchange content rate. Size distribution histograms obtained from the sample at early time points after mixing presented a bimodal population having average sizes of 3.0 ± 0.1 and 5.8 ± 0.1 nm, thus indicating that surface process controls the nanocrystal growth. With longer reaction times the occurrence of water droplet coalescence is likely responsible for the formation of nanocrystal agglomerates. Using a water-in-nonane microemulsion, the droplet exchange rate can be modified, thus leading to smaller CdS nanocrystals. However, the development of structural defects cannot be excluded, as evidenced by the luminescence spectra of the suspension. In general, aging of the nanocrystal in the pristine microemulsion resulted in the development of cubic semiconductor nanostructures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Semiconductor Nanocrystals)
Open AccessArticle Influence of Semiconductor Nanocrystal Concentration on Polymer Hole Transport in Hybrid Nanocomposites
Crystals 2012, 2(1), 78-89; doi:10.3390/cryst2010078
Received: 1 November 2011 / Revised: 30 December 2011 / Accepted: 10 January 2012 / Published: 16 January 2012
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (575 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This article investigates hole transport in poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene] (MEH-PPV)/CdSe colloidal quantum dot (CQD) nanocomposites using a modified time-of-flight photoconductivity technique. The measured hole drift mobilities are analyzed in the context of Bässler’s Gaussian disorder model and the correlated disorder model in order to
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This article investigates hole transport in poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene] (MEH-PPV)/CdSe colloidal quantum dot (CQD) nanocomposites using a modified time-of-flight photoconductivity technique. The measured hole drift mobilities are analyzed in the context of Bässler’s Gaussian disorder model and the correlated disorder model in order to determine the polymer internal morphology of hybrid nanocomposite thin films. This work shows that increasing the CdSe CQD concentration decreases the polymer hole mobility from ~5.9 × 106 cm2/Vs in an MEH-PPV film to ~8.1 × 108 cm2/Vs in a 20:80 (wt%) MEH-PPV:CdSe CQD nanocomposite film (measured at 25 °C and ~2 × 105 V/cm). The corresponding disorder parameters indicate increasing disruption of interchain interaction with increasing CQD concentration. This work quantifies polymer chain morphology in hybrid nanocomposite thin films and provides useful information regarding the optimal use of semiconductor nanocrystals in conjugated polymer-based optoelectronics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Semiconductor Nanocrystals)
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