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Special Issue "Appraisal of Approaches for the Management of Biodiversity and Life Support Systems"

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A special issue of Diversity (ISSN 1424-2818).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 September 2012)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Angela Dikou (Website)

College of Science and Mathematics, University of the Virigin Islands, #2 John Brewers Bay, St. Thomas, VI 00802-9990, USA
Phone: +1 340 693 1457
Fax: +1 340 693 1245
Interests: coral reef and coastal wetlands ecology and management; marine resource management (fisheries, protected areas)

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The diversity of environmental and natural resource management projects to reduce human footprint calls for geographic, contextual, and substantive comparisons. The journal Diversity invites multidisciplinary research, review and case-study articles under the Special Issue of "Appraisal of approaches for the management of biodiversity and life support systems". The work should be evaluating outcomes of paradigms, approaches, initiatives and tools for the management of biodiversity, whole ecosystems, ecosystem components and services in terms of effectiveness, efficiency and/or equity. Contributions that integrate ecology, economics and/or social sciences are particularly encouraged. Areas of interest include, but are not limited to, restoration, spatial planning, protected areas, co-management and adaptive management, mitigation of climate change impacts, valuation, and policy tools. Deadline for the submission of contributions is 1st September 2012.

Dr. Angela Dikou
Guest Editor

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Climate, Management and Habitat Associations of Avian Fauna in Restored Wetlands of California’s Central Valley, USA
Diversity 2012, 4(4), 396-418; doi:10.3390/d4040396
Received: 3 September 2012 / Revised: 30 October 2012 / Accepted: 15 November 2012 / Published: 23 November 2012
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (503 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The Wetlands Reserve Program (WRP) is one of several programs implemented by the United States Department of Agriculture to facilitate natural resource management on private lands. Since the WRP’s inception approximately 29,000 ha in California’s Central Valley (CCV) have been restored. However [...] Read more.
The Wetlands Reserve Program (WRP) is one of several programs implemented by the United States Department of Agriculture to facilitate natural resource management on private lands. Since the WRP’s inception approximately 29,000 ha in California’s Central Valley (CCV) have been restored. However until now, actual benefits of the program to wildlife have never been evaluated. Hydrology in the CCV has been heavily modified and WRP wetlands are managed primarily to support wintering waterfowl. We surveyed over 60 WRP easements in 2008 and 2009 to quantify avian use and categorized bird species into 11 foraging guilds. We detected over 200 bird species in 2008 and 119 species in 2009, which is similar to or higher than numbers observed on other managed sites in the same area. We found that actively managed WRP wetlands support more waterfowl than sites under low or intermediate management, which is consistent with intended goals. Despite reported water shortages, greater upland and un-restored acreage in the southern CCV, WRP wetlands support large numbers of waterfowl and shorebirds, particularly in the early fall months. This is probably due to the severe lack of alternative habitat such as wildlife friendly crops at appropriate stages of the migration cycle. Improved access to water resources for hydrological management would greatly enhance waterfowl use in the southern CCV. Full article
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Open AccessArticle The Challenge of Managing Marine Biodiversity: A Practical Toolkit for a Cartographic, Territorial Approach
Diversity 2012, 4(4), 419-452; doi:10.3390/d4040419
Received: 3 September 2012 / Revised: 8 October 2012 / Accepted: 6 November 2012 / Published: 23 November 2012
Cited by 14 | PDF Full-text (3522 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
An approach to the management of marine biodiversity was developed based on two levels of environmental diagnostics: (1) the characterization (to identify types), and (2) the evaluation (to define status and values). Both levels involve the production of maps, namely: (i) morphobathymetry [...] Read more.
An approach to the management of marine biodiversity was developed based on two levels of environmental diagnostics: (1) the characterization (to identify types), and (2) the evaluation (to define status and values). Both levels involve the production of maps, namely: (i) morphobathymetry and sedimentology; (ii) habitats; (iii) natural emergencies; (iv) degradation and risk; (v) weighted vulnerability; (vi) environmental quality; and, (vii) susceptibility to use. A general methodological aspect that must be stated first is the need of dividing the mapped area in territorial units corresponding to submultiples of the UTM grid and having different sizes according to the scale adopted. Territorial units (grid cells) are assigned to one of five classes of evaluation, ranging from high necessity of conservation or protection to non-problematic, unimportant or already compromised (according to the specific map) situations. Depending on the scale, these maps are suited for territorial planning (small scales, allowing for a synoptic view) or for administration and decision making (large scales, providing detail on local situations and problems). Mapping should be periodically repeated (diachronic cartography) to assure an efficient tool for integrated coastal zone management. Full article
Open AccessArticle Conservation Strategy for Brown Bear and Its Habitat in Nepal
Diversity 2012, 4(3), 301-317; doi:10.3390/d4030301
Received: 23 June 2012 / Revised: 23 July 2012 / Accepted: 31 July 2012 / Published: 10 August 2012
Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (2899 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The Himalaya region of Nepal encompasses significant habitats for several endangered species, among them the brown bear (Ursus arctos pruinosus). However, owing to the remoteness of the region and a dearth of research, knowledge on the conservation status, habitat and [...] Read more.
The Himalaya region of Nepal encompasses significant habitats for several endangered species, among them the brown bear (Ursus arctos pruinosus). However, owing to the remoteness of the region and a dearth of research, knowledge on the conservation status, habitat and population size of this species is lacking. Our aim in this paper is to report a habitat survey designed to assess the distribution and habitat characteristics of the brown bear in the Nepalese Himalaya, and to summarize a conservation action plan for the species devised at a pair of recent workshops held in Nepal. Results of our survey showed that brown bear were potentially distributed between 3800 m and 5500 m in the high mountainous region of Nepal, across an area of 4037 km2 between the eastern border of Shey Phoksundo National Park (SPNP) and the Manasalu Conservation Area (MCA). Of that area, 2066 km2 lie inside the protected area (350 km2 in the MCA; 1716 km2 in the Annapurna Conservation Area) and 48% (1917 km2) lies outside the protected area in the Dolpa district. Furthermore, 37% of brown bear habitat also forms a potential habitat for blue sheep (or bharal, Pseudois nayaur), and 17% of these habitats is used by livestock, suggesting a significant potential for resource competition. Several plant species continue to be uprooted by local people for fuel wood. Based on the results of our field survey combined with consultations with local communities and scientists, we propose that government and non-government organizations should implement a three-stage program of conservation activities for the brown bear. This program should: (a) Detail research activities in and outside the protected area of Nepal; (b) support livelihood and conservation awareness at local and national levels; and (c) strengthen local capacity and reduce human-wildlife conflict in the region. Full article

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