Special Issue "Natural Resources: Human Dimension and Social Aspects of Nature Protection"

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A special issue of Diversity (ISSN 1424-2818).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2010)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Malgorzata Grodzinska-Jurczak

Institute of Environmental Sciences, Jagiellonian University, Gronostajowa 7, 30-387 Krakow, Poland
Website | E-Mail
Interests: human dimension of natural resources; human-nature conflicts’ resolving in protected areas; natura 2000 implementation (communication, awareness raising); environmental awareness of public; public participation in waste management; environmental education in formal and non-formal system

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

To meet the requirements of the current nature protection system, authorities of many countries have to reconstruct the system and methodology of managing natural resources. This pertains to both: changes in the attitude to natural resource management from a strictly traditional one (considering the biophysical perspective to be the most important perspective in the resource management decision-making process) to a more modern one (characterized by a social sciences approach to natural resource issues, and creating a system allowing for their practical application). It seems impossible to create such a system without the collaboration of human dimension (HD) approach. A rising number of conflicts emerging as a result of implementing various forms of environmental protection programs requires a better understanding of the social consequences of decisions concerning natural resources, and methods’ improvement of employing HD information in the decision-making process.

All studies on human dimension approach worldwide are warmly welcomed in the following Special Issue of Diversity. We are particularly interested in case studies showing how the incorporation of HD approach has affected the natural resources management both in the global scale and in individual countries.

Malgorzata Grodzinska-Jurczak, Ph. D.
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • human dimension
  • natural resource management
  • protection of natural resources’ conflicts
  • human-wildlife conflicts
  • conflict management
  • public communication
  • public consultation
  • participatory approach

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Cultural Diversity Issues in Biodiversity Monitoring—Cases of Lithuania, Poland and Denmark
Diversity 2010, 2(9), 1130-1145; doi:10.3390/d2091130
Received: 31 July 2010 / Accepted: 1 September 2010 / Published: 3 September 2010
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (311 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Public participation is a key element in nature conservation in Europe and a necessity for collecting broad scale data on biodiversity and its dynamics. However, vast societal differences exist between eastern and western European countries, resulting in problems for public participation in post-communist
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Public participation is a key element in nature conservation in Europe and a necessity for collecting broad scale data on biodiversity and its dynamics. However, vast societal differences exist between eastern and western European countries, resulting in problems for public participation in post-communist states as compared to western countries. Here, we compare diversity in monitoring practices and public participation in countries with different political histories. Drawing on in-depth ethnographic studies conducted in Lithuania and Poland, as well as a rapid assessment in Denmark, we have focused on the historical, cultural and social determinants of the volunteers’ participation in biodiversity monitoring. Our results indicate the reasons why volunteer involvement—as an expression of a participatory approach—has a lower incidence in the post-communist countries, compared to voluntarism common in occidental democracies. We discuss our results in the context of the main social factors considered to be a legacy of the Soviet regime. Full article

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