Special Issue "Feature Papers"

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A special issue of Electronics (ISSN 2079-9292).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2012)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Mostafa Bassiouni (Website)

Department of Computer Science, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816, USA
Interests: computer networks; wireless networks; performance evaluation; distributed and real-time protocols; distributed systems; operating systems; databases
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Guifang Li (Website)

The College of Optics & Photonics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816, USA
Interests: optical communications and networking; RF photonics; all-optical signal processing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This special issue is intended to present feature and scholarly papers that address some of the diverse array of topics related to Electronics. These topics include but are not limited to computer and information technology; wireless and mobile communications; instrumentation, measurement and testing; microwave techniques and devices; satellite communication systems; photonics and optical communications; radar and sonar technology; semiconductors and signal processing; control and embedded systems; and biomedical electronics. Technological advances in all these areas have profoundly affected all aspects of modern life. A large number of people worldwide entirely depend on modern electronic devices on a daily basis. Various electronic services and products are critically important for the successful functioning of all sectors of modern economy including health, education, e-commerce, manufacturing, retail industry, real state, mass media, sports, entertainment, transport and tourism. We invite scientists and researchers from all fields of electronics to submit papers for this important first special issue of Electronics. Case studies, reviews and research papers on all topics related to electronics are invited.

Prof. Dr. Mostafa Bassiouni
Prof. Dr. Guifang Li
Guest Editors

Keywords

  • wireless, sensor and mobile communications
  • microwave devices and satellite communications
  • power electronics and motor drives
  • renewable energy and energy conversion
  • computer architecture, parallel processing and optimization
  • semiconductors and integrated circuit devices
  • signal, video and image processing
  • control systems, intelligent systems and robotics
  • optical communications and laser technology
  • biomedical engineering and bioinformatics
  • multimedia database systems and data mining

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle A Simulative Study on Active Disturbance Rejection Control (ADRC) as a Control Tool for Practitioners
Electronics 2013, 2(3), 246-279; doi:10.3390/electronics2030246
Received: 20 May 2013 / Revised: 27 June 2013 / Accepted: 22 July 2013 / Published: 15 August 2013
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (1570 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
As an alternative to both classical PID-type and modern model-based approaches to solving control problems, active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) has gained significant traction in recent years. With its simple tuning method and robustness against process parameter variations, it puts itself forward [...] Read more.
As an alternative to both classical PID-type and modern model-based approaches to solving control problems, active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) has gained significant traction in recent years. With its simple tuning method and robustness against process parameter variations, it puts itself forward as a valuable addition to the toolbox of control engineering practitioners. This article aims at providing a single-source introduction and reference to linear ADRC with this audience in mind. A simulative study is carried out using generic first- and second-order plants to enable a quick visual assessment of the abilities of ADRC. Finally, a modified form of the discrete-time case is introduced to speed up real-time implementations as necessary in applications with high dynamic requirements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers)
Open AccessArticle Modified EAS Tag Used as a Resistive Sensor Platform
Electronics 2012, 1(2), 32-46; doi:10.3390/electronics1020032
Received: 6 September 2012 / Revised: 30 October 2012 / Accepted: 30 October 2012 / Published: 9 November 2012
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2241 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this article, a modified design of an RF Radio Frequency Electronic Article Surveillance (EAS) tag, used as a sensor platform, is manufactured and characterized. EAS tags are passive devices consisting of a capacitor and coil, tuned to a resonance frequency readable [...] Read more.
In this article, a modified design of an RF Radio Frequency Electronic Article Surveillance (EAS) tag, used as a sensor platform, is manufactured and characterized. EAS tags are passive devices consisting of a capacitor and coil, tuned to a resonance frequency readable by the detector equipment, in this case 8.2 MHz. They were originally used to detect whether merchandise was being moved through the detection gates at shop exits, in which case an alarm was triggered. If the capacitance is divided in two and a resistive sensor device inserted in between, the resonant Inductor-Capacitor (LC) circuit becomes an Inductor-Capacitor-Capacitor-Resistor LCCR circuit and can be used as a sensor tag. A high sensor resistance means that one capacitor is decoupled, leading to one resonance frequency, while a low resistance will couple both capacitances into the circuit, resulting in a lower resonance frequency. Different types of resistive sensors exist that are able to detect properties such as pressure, moisture, light and temperature. The tag is manufactured in Aluminum foil on a polyetylentereftalat (PET) substrate, resulting in a cost effective RF-platform for various resistive sensors. Two types of tags are designed and manufactured, one with parallel plate capacitors and the other with interdigital capacitors. To test the tags, a resistive tilt sensor is mounted and the tags are characterized using a network analyzer. It is shown that for high resistance, the tags have a resonance frequency of morethan 10 MHz while for low values the frequency approaches 8.2 MHz. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers)
Open AccessArticle Radiation Effects in Carbon Nanoelectronics
Electronics 2012, 1(1), 23-31; doi:10.3390/electronics1010023
Received: 27 April 2012 / Revised: 15 June 2012 / Accepted: 19 June 2012 / Published: 3 July 2012
Cited by 15 | PDF Full-text (354 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We experimentally investigate the effects of Co-60 irradiation on the electrical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube and graphene field-effect transistors. We observe significant differences in the radiation response of devices depending on their irradiation environment, and confirm that, under controlled conditions, standard [...] Read more.
We experimentally investigate the effects of Co-60 irradiation on the electrical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube and graphene field-effect transistors. We observe significant differences in the radiation response of devices depending on their irradiation environment, and confirm that, under controlled conditions, standard dielectric hardening approaches are applicable to carbon nanoelectronics devices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers)
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Open AccessArticle Multiple Bit Error Tolerant Galois Field Architectures Over GF (2m)
Electronics 2012, 1(1), 3-22; doi:10.3390/electronics1010003
Received: 14 May 2012 / Revised: 29 May 2012 / Accepted: 11 June 2012 / Published: 26 June 2012
PDF Full-text (1066 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Radiation induced transient faults like single event upsets (SEU) and multiple event upsets (MEU) in memories are well researched. As a result of the technology scaling, it is observed that the logic blocks are also vulnerable to malfunctioning when they are deployed [...] Read more.
Radiation induced transient faults like single event upsets (SEU) and multiple event upsets (MEU) in memories are well researched. As a result of the technology scaling, it is observed that the logic blocks are also vulnerable to malfunctioning when they are deployed in radiation prone environment. However, the current literature is lacking efforts to mitigate such issues in the digital logic circuits when exposed to natural radiation prone environment or when they are subjected to malicious attacks by an eavesdropper using highly energized particles. This may lead to catastrophe in critical applications such as widely used cryptographic hardware. In this paper, novel dynamic error correction architectures, based on the BCH codes, is proposed for correcting multiple errors which makes the circuits robust against radiation induced faults irrespective of the location of the errors. As a benchmark test case, the finite field multiplier circuit is considered as the functional block which can be the target for major attacks. The proposed scheme has the capability to handle stuck-at faults that are also a major cause of failure affecting the overall yield of a nano-CMOS integrated chip. The experimental results show that the proposed dynamic error detection and correction architecture results in 50% reduction in critical path delay by dynamically bypassing the error correction logic when no error is present. The area overhead for the larger multiplier is within 150% which is 33% lower than the TMR and comparable to 130% overhead of single error correcting Hamming and LDPC based techniques. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview High-Feedback Operation of Power Electronic Converters
Electronics 2013, 2(2), 113-167; doi:10.3390/electronics2020113
Received: 29 November 2012 / Revised: 4 February 2013 / Accepted: 11 February 2013 / Published: 27 March 2013
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (2760 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The purpose of this review is to provide a survey of some of the most important bifurcation phenomena that one can observe in pulse-modulated converter systems when operating with high corrector gain factors. Like other systems with switching control, electronic converter systems [...] Read more.
The purpose of this review is to provide a survey of some of the most important bifurcation phenomena that one can observe in pulse-modulated converter systems when operating with high corrector gain factors. Like other systems with switching control, electronic converter systems belong to the class of piecewise-smooth dynamical systems. A characteristic feature of such systems is that the trajectory is “sewed” together from subsequent discrete parts. Moreover, the transitions between different modes of operation in response to a parameter variation are often qualitatively different from the bifurcations we know for smooth systems. The review starts with an introduction to the concept of border-collision bifurcations and also demonstrates the approach by which the full dynamics of the piecewise-linear, time-continuous system can be reduced to the dynamics of a piecewise-smooth map. We describe the main bifurcation structures that one observes in three different types of converter systems: (1) a DC/DC converter; (2) a multi-level DC/DC converter; and (3) a DC/AC converter. Our focus will be on the bifurcations by which the regular switching dynamics becomes unstable and is replaced by ergodic or resonant periodic dynamics on the surface of a two-dimensional torus. This transition occurs when the feedback gain is increased beyond a certain threshold, for instance in Electronics 2013, 2 114 order to improve the speed and accuracy of the output voltage regulation. For each of the three converter types, we discuss a number of additional bifurcation phenomena, including the formation and reconstruction of multi-layered tori and the appearance of phase-synchronized quasiperiodicity. Our numerical simulations are compared with experimentally observed waveforms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers)

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

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