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Special Issue "CO2 Capture"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2017)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Fernando Rubiera González

Instituto Nacional del Carbón, CSIC, Apdo. 73, 33080 Oviedo, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: CO2 capture; coal and biomass conversion; gasification; biomass treatment
Guest Editor
Dr. Covadonga Pevida García

Instituto Nacional del Carbón, CSIC, Apdo. 73, 33080 Oviedo, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: CO2 capture; coal and biomass conversion; gasification; biomass treatment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is widely acknowledged as a way of reducing CO2 emissions from large-point stationary sources. CCS involves three main routes to continue using fossil fuels in the transition to a low carbon energy system: postcombustion, precombustion, and oxyfuel capture.

This Special Issue focuses on current developments in CO2 capture including all levels of technology readiness from mature to emerging technologies. The special issue is open to contributors in all fields of CCS. We invite submissions of novel and original papers that might contribute to technical knowledge and scientific insight in the field of CCS in areas that include but are not limited to the following topics:

  • Postcombustion capture: novel solvents, adsorption, membranes
  • Precombustion capture: chemical and physical absorption, adsorption, chemical looping, sorption enhanced WGS
  • Oxyfuel combustion: chemical looping combustion
  • Bio-CCS
  • Emerging CCS systems

Dr. Fernando Rubiera González
Dr. Covadonga Pevida García
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • CO2 capture
  • Post-combustion
  • Pre-combustion
  • Oxyfuel
  • Emerging CCS systems
  • Solvents
  • Sorbents
  • Membranes
  • Enzymes
  • Algae

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Separation of CO2 in a Solid Waste Management Incineration Facility Using Activated Carbon Derived from Pine Sawdust
Energies 2017, 10(6), 827; doi:10.3390/en10060827
Received: 30 March 2017 / Revised: 7 June 2017 / Accepted: 15 June 2017 / Published: 20 June 2017
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Abstract
The selective separation of CO2 from gas mixtures representative of flue gas generated in waste incineration systems is studied on two activated carbons obtained from pine sawdust and compared to a commercial activated carbon. Dynamic adsorption experiments were conducted in a fixed-bed
[...] Read more.
The selective separation of CO2 from gas mixtures representative of flue gas generated in waste incineration systems is studied on two activated carbons obtained from pine sawdust and compared to a commercial activated carbon. Dynamic adsorption experiments were conducted in a fixed-bed adsorption column using a binary mixture (N2/CO2) with a composition representative of incineration streams at temperatures from 30 to 70 °C. The adsorption behavior of humid mixtures (N2/CO2/H2O) was also evaluated in order to assess the influence of water vapor in CO2 adsorption at different relative humidity in the feed gas: 22% and 60%. Moreover, CO2 adsorption was studied in less favorable conditions, i.e., departing from a bed initially saturated with H2O. In addition, the effect of CO2 on H2O adsorption was examined. Experimental results showed that the CO2 adsorption capacity can be reduced significantly by the adsorption of H2O (up to 60% at high relative humidity conditions). On the other hand, the breakthrough tests over the adsorbent initially saturated with water vapor indicated that H2O is little affected by CO2 adsorption. The experimental results pointed out the biomass based carbons as best candidates for CO2 separation under incineration flue gas conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue CO2 Capture)
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Open AccessArticle Effect of Gas Recycling on the Performance of a Moving Bed Temperature-Swing (MBTSA) Process for CO2 Capture in a Coal Fired Power Plant Context
Energies 2017, 10(6), 745; doi:10.3390/en10060745
Received: 2 April 2017 / Revised: 18 May 2017 / Accepted: 20 May 2017 / Published: 25 May 2017
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Abstract
A mathematical model of a continuous moving-bed temperature-swing adsorption (MBTSA) process for post-combustion CO2 capture in a coal-fired power plant context has been developed. Process simulations have been done using single component isotherms and measured gas diffusion parameters of an activated carbon
[...] Read more.
A mathematical model of a continuous moving-bed temperature-swing adsorption (MBTSA) process for post-combustion CO2 capture in a coal-fired power plant context has been developed. Process simulations have been done using single component isotherms and measured gas diffusion parameters of an activated carbon adsorbent. While a simple process configuration with no gas re-circulation gives quite low capture rate and CO2 purity, 86% and 65%, respectively, more advanced process configurations where some of the captured gas is recirculated to the incoming flue gas drastically increase both the capture rate and CO2 purity, the best configuration reaching capture rate of 86% and CO2 purity of 98%. Further improvements can be achieved by using adsorbents with higher CO2/N2 selectivity and/or higher temperature of the regeneration section. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue CO2 Capture)
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Open AccessArticle Understanding and Modelling the Effect of Dissolved Metals on Solvent Degradation in Post Combustion CO2 Capture Based on Pilot Plant Experience
Energies 2017, 10(5), 629; doi:10.3390/en10050629
Received: 16 February 2017 / Revised: 24 April 2017 / Accepted: 26 April 2017 / Published: 4 May 2017
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Abstract
Oxidative degradation is a serious concern for upscaling of amine-based carbon capture technology. Different kinetic models have been proposed based on laboratory experiments, however the kinetic parameters included are limited to those relevant for a lab-scale system and not a capture plant. Besides,
[...] Read more.
Oxidative degradation is a serious concern for upscaling of amine-based carbon capture technology. Different kinetic models have been proposed based on laboratory experiments, however the kinetic parameters included are limited to those relevant for a lab-scale system and not a capture plant. Besides, most of the models fail to recognize the catalytic effect of metals. The objective of this work is to develop a representative kinetic model based on an apparent auto-catalytic reaction mechanism between solvent degradation, corrosion and ammonia emissions. Measurements from four different pilot plants: (i) EnBW’s plant at Heilbronn, Germany (ii) TNO’s plant at Maasvlakte, The Netherlands; (iii) CSIRO’s plants at Loy Yang and Tarong, Australia and (iv) DONG Energy’s plant at Esbjerg, Denmark are utilized to propose a degradation kinetic model for 30 wt % ethanolamine (MEA) as the capture solvent. The kinetic parameters of the model were regressed based on the pilot plant campaign at EnBW. The kinetic model was validated by comparing it with the measurements at the remaining pilot campaigns. The model predicted the trends of ammonia emissions and metal concentration within the same order of magnitude. This study provides a methodology to establish a quantitative approach for predicting the onset of unacceptable degradation levels which can be further used to devise counter-measure strategies such as reclaiming and metal removal. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue CO2 Capture)
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Open AccessArticle Desorption Kinetics and Mechanisms of CO2 on Amine-Based Mesoporous Silica Materials
Energies 2017, 10(1), 115; doi:10.3390/en10010115
Received: 15 November 2016 / Revised: 3 January 2017 / Accepted: 5 January 2017 / Published: 18 January 2017
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Abstract
Tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA)-based mesoporous MCM-41 is used as the adsorbent to determine the CO2 desorption kinetics of amine-modified materials after adsorption. The experimental data of CO2 desorption as a function of time are derived by zero-length column at different temperatures (35, 50,
[...] Read more.
Tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA)-based mesoporous MCM-41 is used as the adsorbent to determine the CO2 desorption kinetics of amine-modified materials after adsorption. The experimental data of CO2 desorption as a function of time are derived by zero-length column at different temperatures (35, 50, and 70 °C) and analyzed by Avrami’s fractional-order kinetic model. A new method is used to distinguish the physical desorption and chemical desorption performance of surface-modified mesoporous MCM-41. The activation energy Ea of CO2 physical desorption and chemical desorption calculated from Arrhenius equation are 15.86 kJ/mol and 57.15 kJ/mol, respectively. Furthermore, intraparticle diffusion and Boyd’s film models are selected to investigate the mechanism of CO2 desorption from MCM-41 and surface-modified MCM-41. For MCM-41, there are three rate-limiting steps during the desorption process. Film diffusion is more prominent for the CO2 desorption rates at low temperatures, and pore diffusion mainly governs the rate-limiting process under higher temperatures. Besides the surface reaction, the desorption process contains four rate-limiting steps on surface-modified MCM-41. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue CO2 Capture)
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Open AccessArticle Promoting Effect of Inorganic Alkali on Carbon Dioxide Adsorption in Amine-Modified MCM-41
Energies 2016, 9(9), 667; doi:10.3390/en9090667
Received: 3 June 2016 / Revised: 27 July 2016 / Accepted: 15 August 2016 / Published: 23 August 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1966 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Three kinds of inorganic alkali are introduced into tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA) and polyethyleneimine (PEI)-modified MCM-41 as the CO2 adsorbents. X-ray diffraction, N2 adsorption, fourier-transform infrared and thermo gravimetric analysis are used to characterize the surface structures and the thermal stability of adsorbents.
[...] Read more.
Three kinds of inorganic alkali are introduced into tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA) and polyethyleneimine (PEI)-modified MCM-41 as the CO2 adsorbents. X-ray diffraction, N2 adsorption, fourier-transform infrared and thermo gravimetric analysis are used to characterize the surface structures and the thermal stability of adsorbents. Chemical titration method is used to measure the alkali amounts of adsorbents. Thermo-gravimetric analysis with 10% CO2/90% N2 as the simulated flue gas is used to test the CO2 adsorption performance of adsorbents. The results show that all three kinds of inorganic alkali-containing adsorbents exhibit higher CO2 adsorption capability than traditional TEPA and PEI modified samples. Ca(OH)2 and PEI modified samples exhibit the highest adsorption capacity and recyclable property. The introduction of inorganic alkali changes the chemical adsorption mechanism between CO2 and adsorbent surface due to the increased hydroxyl groups. The CO2 adsorption capacities have a linear dependence relation with the alkali amounts of adsorbents, indicating that alkali amount is a critical factor for the exploration of novel adsorbents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue CO2 Capture)
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Open AccessArticle On-Site Measurements of CO2 Emissions during the Construction Phase of a Building Complex
Energies 2016, 9(8), 599; doi:10.3390/en9080599
Received: 7 April 2016 / Revised: 3 June 2016 / Accepted: 18 July 2016 / Published: 28 July 2016
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Abstract
This study describes the environmental impact of the material production, transportation, and construction phases from the construction site perspective. CO2 emissions for each process were determined using the Korea Life Cycle Inventory Database (LCI DB) in the material production phase, and the
[...] Read more.
This study describes the environmental impact of the material production, transportation, and construction phases from the construction site perspective. CO2 emissions for each process were determined using the Korea Life Cycle Inventory Database (LCI DB) in the material production phase, and the actual amounts of oil consumption for transportation equipment were identified in the material transportation phase. Generally, the oil and electric energy consumed during the construction was evaluated by direct monitoring. Through the construction period and cost according to work type, a correlation with CO2 emissions was also investigated. In addition, CO2 emissions were examined through the system capacity and gross floor area for each work type. The calculations have shown that CO2 emissions from the material production phase constitute 93.4% of the total CO2 emissions. In addition, CO2 emissions from the material transportation and on-site construction account for 2.4% and 4.2% of the total CO2 emissions, respectively. This paper concludes that it is important to select appropriate input materials and resources for the reduction of CO2 emissions. Furthermore, the amount of CO2 emissions arising from the construction site was reduced by finding and practicing measures to reduce CO2 emissions for each process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue CO2 Capture)
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Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Recent Progress and Novel Applications in Enzymatic Conversion of Carbon Dioxide
Energies 2017, 10(4), 473; doi:10.3390/en10040473
Received: 4 March 2017 / Revised: 20 March 2017 / Accepted: 27 March 2017 / Published: 3 April 2017
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Abstract
Turning carbon dioxide (CO2) into fuels and chemicals using chemical, photochemical, electrochemical, and enzymatic methods could be used to recycle large quantities of carbon. The enzymatic method, which is inspired by cellular CO2 metabolism, has attracted considerable attention for efficient
[...] Read more.
Turning carbon dioxide (CO2) into fuels and chemicals using chemical, photochemical, electrochemical, and enzymatic methods could be used to recycle large quantities of carbon. The enzymatic method, which is inspired by cellular CO2 metabolism, has attracted considerable attention for efficient CO2 conversion due to improved selectivity and yields under mild reaction conditions. In this review, the research progress of green and potent enzymatic conversion of CO2 into useful fuels and chemicals was discussed. Furthermore, applications of the enzymatic conversion of CO2 to assist in CO2 capture and sequestration were highlighted. A summary including the industrial applications, barriers, and some perspectives on the research and development of the enzymatic approach to convert CO2 were introduced. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue CO2 Capture)
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