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Special Issue "Methane Hydrate Research and Development"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 April 2017

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Richard B. Coffin

Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, Texas A&M University - Corpus Christi, 6300 Ocean Drive, Corpus Christi, TX 78421, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: variation in methane hydrate abundance in world ocean coastal regions; shallow sediment methane cycling; methane flux to the atmosphere; elemental isotope analyses
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Bjørn Kvamme

Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen, 5020 Bergen, Norway
Website | E-Mail
Interests: thermodynamics and statistical thermodynamics; gas hydrates stability and kinetics; polar solutions and electrolyte solutions; kinetics of phase transitions; emulsion fundamentals; fundamentals of adsorption and practical applications
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Stephen Masutani

Hawaii Natural Energy Institute, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: thermochemistry; kinetics; transport phenomena; hydrates; multi-phase flows; renewable energy; carbon sequestration
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Norio Tenma

Research Institute of Energy Frontier, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Japan
Website | E-Mail
Interests: numerical simulation; geo-mechanics; methane hydrate; geothermal
Guest Editor
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Tsutomu Uchida

Department of Applied Science and Engineering, School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Japan
Website | E-Mail
Interests: ice; water; gas hydrate; biophysics; crystal

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A special issue of the open access journal Energies is planned on gas hydrate research. A discounted Article Processing Charge will be offered to all participants of past International Workshops on Methane Hydrate Research and Development, including Fiery Ice 2016.

Authors are invited to submit manuscripts for peer review on a broad range of topics related to gas hydrates including (but not limited to):

  • resource assessment;
  • policy;
  • exploration;
  • reservoir modeling;
  • production modeling;
  • environmental studies;
  • fundamental laboratory investigations; and
  • hydrate thermodynamics and kinetics.

Prof. Richard B. Coffin
Prof. Dr. Bjørn Kvamme
Prof. Dr. Stepehn Masutani
Prof. Dr. Norio Tenma
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Tsutomu Uchida
Guest Editors

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs).

 

Keywords

  • Gas hydrates
  • Hydrate thermodynamics and kinetics.
  • Fiery Ice
  • Climate change
  • Coastal stability mining
  • Resource assessment
  • Policy
  • Exploration
  • Reservoir modeling
  • Production modeling
  • Environmental studies
  • Fundamental laboratory investigations
  • Hydrate thermodynamics and kinetics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Using a Reactive Transport Simulator to Simulate CH4 Production from Bear Island Basin in the Barents Sea Utilizing the Depressurization Method†
Energies 2017, 10(2), 187; doi:10.3390/en10020187
Received: 31 December 2016 / Accepted: 4 February 2017 / Published: 8 February 2017
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Abstract
The enormous amount of methane stored in natural gas hydrates (NGHs)worldwide offers a significant potential source of energy. NGHs will be generally unable to reach thermodynamic equilibrium at their in situ reservoir conditions due to the number of active phases involved. Lack of
[...] Read more.
The enormous amount of methane stored in natural gas hydrates (NGHs)worldwide offers a significant potential source of energy. NGHs will be generally unable to reach thermodynamic equilibrium at their in situ reservoir conditions due to the number of active phases involved. Lack of reliable field data makes it difficult to predict the production potential and safety of CH4 production from NGHs. While the computer simulations will never be able to replace field data, one can apply state-of-the-artmodellingtechniquestoevaluateseveralpossiblelong-termscenarios. Realistic kinetic models for hydrate dissociation and reformation will be required, as well as analysis of all phase transition routes. This work utilizes our in-house extension of RetrasoCodeBright (RCB), a reactive transport simulator, to perform a gas hydrate production case study of the Bjørnøya (Bear Island) basin, a promising field with very limited geological data reported by available field studies. The use of a reactive transport simulator allowed us to implement non-equilibrium thermodynamics for analysisofCH4 production from the gas hydrates by treating each phase transition involving hydrates as a pseudo reaction. Our results showed a rapid propagation of the pressure drop through the reservoir following the imposition of pressure drawdown at the well. Consequently, gas hydrate dissociation and CH4 production began in the early stages of the five-year simulation period. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Methane Hydrate Research and Development)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Gas Hydrate Growth Kinetics: A Parametric Study
Energies 2016, 9(12), 1021; doi:10.3390/en9121021
Received: 11 August 2016 / Revised: 28 October 2016 / Accepted: 28 November 2016 / Published: 5 December 2016
PDF Full-text (4314 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Gas hydrate growth kinetics was studied at a pressure of 90 bars to investigate the effect of temperature, initial water content, stirring rate, and reactor size in stirred semi-batch autoclave reactors. The mixing energy during hydrate growth was estimated by logging the power
[...] Read more.
Gas hydrate growth kinetics was studied at a pressure of 90 bars to investigate the effect of temperature, initial water content, stirring rate, and reactor size in stirred semi-batch autoclave reactors. The mixing energy during hydrate growth was estimated by logging the power consumed. The theoretical model by Garcia-Ochoa and Gomez for estimation of the mass transfer parameters in stirred tanks has been used to evaluate the dispersion parameters of the system. The mean bubble size, impeller power input per unit volume, and impeller Reynold’s number/tip velocity were used for analyzing observed trends from the gas hydrate growth data. The growth behavior was analyzed based on the gas consumption and the growth rate per unit initial water content. The results showed that the growth rate strongly depended on the flow pattern in the cell, the gas-liquid mass transfer characteristics, and the mixing efficiency from stirring. Scale-up effects indicate that maintaining the growth rate per unit volume of reactants upon scale-up with geometric similarity does not depend only on gas dispersion in the liquid phase but may rather be a function of the specific thermal conductance, and heat and mass transfer limitations created by the limit to the degree of the liquid phase dispersion is batched and semi-batched stirred tank reactors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Methane Hydrate Research and Development)
Figures

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