Special Issue "Network vs. Application Based Solutions for NGN"

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A special issue of Future Internet (ISSN 1999-5903).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2010)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Antonio Cuevas Casado

Telefónica Germany GmbH & Co. OHG, Überseering 33a, D-22297 Hamburg, Germany
E-Mail
Interests: next -or 4th- generation network; NGN; 4G; 3GPP system architecture evolution (SAE) evolved packet core (EPC); IMS; service platforms; business aspects/models; SIP; QoS; DiffServ; IntServ; AAA; diameter; mobile IPv6; Micro-mobility/seamless handovers: fast handovers, make before break; NGN/internet architectures integrating the above

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

NGN (next generation network) is being so commonly and enthusiastically used, both by the scientific and industry communities, that it is becoming a kind of buzzword covering a myriad of research topics and industrial trends. Under this vast and heterogeneous field, some common directions can be distinguished, among others, IP and the Internet as universal public communication network, mobility and ubiquity, openness to applications, devices and access technologies, and the growing role of machine to machine communication. A lot of new services are being explored but research also focuses on adapting and integrating traditional features to these new networks.

Solutions for NGN are designed at different layers, sometimes cooperating but also competing between them. For instance, mobility can be tackled at the network layer using Mobile IP while SIP (Session Initiation Protocol) offers its approach at the application layer. The choice of the layer where to develop the solutions is a major issue and has impact in aspects like performance or ease of deployment in legacy infrastructures. It may also challenge the Internet paradigm of network neutrality by relocating the “intelligence” from the applications at the edges to the network core.

We thus believe that a careful election of the layer(s) is a fundamental issue in the NGN research and deserves the interest of this special issue. We welcome papers giving answers in this direction. Comparisons of solutions developed at different layers, performance evaluation (including simulation techniques), cross-layer architectures, discussions on the implication for the network control, are some of the topics to be considered. We are confident that this special issue will be of great interest to the research community.

Dr. Antonio Cuevas Casado
Guest Editor

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Evolution of the Converged NGN Service Platforms Towards Future Networks
Future Internet 2011, 3(1), 67-86; doi:10.3390/fi3010067
Received: 21 February 2011 / Accepted: 28 February 2011 / Published: 4 March 2011
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (545 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This article presents a comparison of main characteristics of the Next Generation Networks (NGN) and Future Generation Internet (FGI). The aim is to discuss and compare two approaches to Future Networks (FN) and services: the evolution of NGN, and the revolutionary approach of
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This article presents a comparison of main characteristics of the Next Generation Networks (NGN) and Future Generation Internet (FGI). The aim is to discuss and compare two approaches to Future Networks (FN) and services: the evolution of NGN, and the revolutionary approach of a new FGI. We present both frameworks from the services point of view as they are delivered to the end-user, as well as from the architectural point of view. We compare selected properties of both approaches to explain commonalities and differences. Their challenges are similar: managing the quality of experience, mobility, security, scalability and providing openness to applications. Based on this comparison, we evaluate possible areas for future convergence in the approach of the two architectures to the Future Network concept. Our analysis shows that despite their different backgrounds, the internet’s FGI and telco’s NGN are not that different after all. The convergence of the two approaches therefore seems the only logical way forward. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Network vs. Application Based Solutions for NGN)
Open AccessArticle Look-Ahead Strategies Based on Store-Carry and Forward Relaying for Energy Efficient Cellular Communications
Future Internet 2010, 2(4), 587-602; doi:10.3390/fi2040587
Received: 15 September 2010 / Revised: 25 October 2010 / Accepted: 2 November 2010 / Published: 4 November 2010
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (784 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
With the increasing availability of Internet type services on mobile devices and the attractive flat rate all-you-can-eat billing system, cellular telecommunication networks are experiencing a tremendous growth in data usage demand. However, there are increasing concerns that current network deployment trends (including more
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With the increasing availability of Internet type services on mobile devices and the attractive flat rate all-you-can-eat billing system, cellular telecommunication networks are experiencing a tremendous growth in data usage demand. However, there are increasing concerns that current network deployment trends (including more efficient radio access techniques and increased spectrum allocation strategies), will be unable to support the increased Internet traffic in a sustainable way. The delay tolerant nature of mobile Internet traffic allows for a large degree of flexibility in optimizing network performance to meet different design objectives and it’s a feature that has mostly gone unexplored by the research community. In this paper, we introduce a novel message forwarding mechanism in cellular networks that benefits from the inherent delay tolerance of Internet type services to provide flexible and adjustable forwarding strategies for efficient network operation while guaranteeing timely deliveries. By capitalizing on the elasticity of message delivery deadlines and the actual mobility of nodes inside the cell, considerable performance gains can be achieved by physically propagating information messages within the network. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Network vs. Application Based Solutions for NGN)
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Open AccessArticle A Survey on Security in Mobile Peer-to-Peer Architectures—Overlay-Based vs. Underlay-Based Approaches
Future Internet 2010, 2(4), 505-532; doi:10.3390/fi2040505
Received: 10 September 2010 / Revised: 1 October 2010 / Accepted: 8 October 2010 / Published: 13 October 2010
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (283 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Mobile Ad hoc networks (MANET) and Peer-to-Peer (P2P) networks share central characteristics such as their distributed and decentralized nature. Combining both networking paradigms results in a Mobile Peer-to-Peer (MP2P) system that operates independently from a preexisting infrastructure. Securing MP2P networks in terms of
[...] Read more.
Mobile Ad hoc networks (MANET) and Peer-to-Peer (P2P) networks share central characteristics such as their distributed and decentralized nature. Combining both networking paradigms results in a Mobile Peer-to-Peer (MP2P) system that operates independently from a preexisting infrastructure. Securing MP2P networks in terms of availability and robustness as basic demands in envisioned application scenarios like first responder operations is a challenging task. In this article, we present a survey of selected threats and of state of the art countermeasures for MANETs and P2P networks. Further, we discuss the efficiency of MANET and P2P security mechanisms when applied in MP2P networks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Network vs. Application Based Solutions for NGN)
Open AccessArticle Exploiting the In-Network Capabilities of Multicast to Discover Proximate IPTV Channels
Future Internet 2010, 2(4), 431-445; doi:10.3390/fi2040431
Received: 11 August 2010 / Revised: 24 September 2010 / Accepted: 25 September 2010 / Published: 29 September 2010
PDF Full-text (224 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
IPTV has become the next generation of television due, in part, to its ability to support features that have been lacking in conventional broadcasting—for example, end-user interactivity, personalisation and localisation. Providers are also searching for the most efficient delivery methods to provide the
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IPTV has become the next generation of television due, in part, to its ability to support features that have been lacking in conventional broadcasting—for example, end-user interactivity, personalisation and localisation. Providers are also searching for the most efficient delivery methods to provide the greatest amount of contents at the lowest cost. At present IPTV uses IP multicast to deliver live TV channels in an over-provisioned walled-garden network due to issues of deploying multicast and QoS challenges in the public Internet. However, IPTV is likely to shift into some parts of the public Internet in the future as a managed service. Multicast routing is performed on a per-session destination-address basis so each router maintains a table of all of the multicast addresses to which the content is being forwarded. We exploit this information to discover and join the in-progress channels of geographically proximate users and to create a new incentivised premium service in future IPTV networks called ProxyTV. This approach is expected to minimise network bandwidth requirements as it enables ISPs to optimise bandwidth on their edge networks. This becomes increasingly significant as TV content consumes more and more bandwidth, especially with the onset of HD and 3D capabilities. In this paper, we have presented in detail the concept with the results of a survey and an analysis of network traffic to justify the proposed approach. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Network vs. Application Based Solutions for NGN)
Open AccessArticle Implementing Value Added Applications in Next Generation Networks
Future Internet 2010, 2(3), 282-294; doi:10.3390/fi2030282
Received: 22 July 2010 / Accepted: 3 August 2010 / Published: 6 August 2010
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1021 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
One of the major issues in the future Internet is the integration of telecom networks with the Internet. In many countries, large Internet Service Providers (ISPs) are also telecom operators that have been focusing on providing Internet services through their telecom networks with
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One of the major issues in the future Internet is the integration of telecom networks with the Internet. In many countries, large Internet Service Providers (ISPs) are also telecom operators that have been focusing on providing Internet services through their telecom networks with telecom-grade mechanisms. In this article, we show that IP Multimedia Subsystem (IMS) is a telecom-grade mechanism that addresses this important issue. In Next Generation Network (NGN), IMS supports IP-based multimedia services that can be accessed from various wireless and wired access technologies through fixed-mobile convergence. We show how to integrate Internet Protocol Television (IPTV) with NGN/IMS to offer enhanced IPTV services for subscribers with set-top boxes or mobile phones. We specifically describe the implementations of three services: weather forecasts, short messages on TV screens and TV shopping/food ordering for mobile users. Although these services can be directly implemented in the Internet, our commercial operation experiences indicate that the NGN/IMS implementation has advantages in terms of telecom-grade security, Quality of Service (QoS), and flexible service creation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Network vs. Application Based Solutions for NGN)
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