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Special Issue "Organic Micro-Pollutants and Human Exposure"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environment Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2017

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Emmanuelle Vulliet

Header of the group TRACES of the Institute of Analytical Sciences—UMR 5280, 5 rue de la Doua, 69100 Villeurbanne, France
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +33 4 37 42 36 08
Interests: development of analytical strategies based on mass spectrometry to study the behavior of organic micro-pollutants in environmental matrices (occurrence, transformation, (bio)accumulation) and their impact on human metabolism (exposome) or aquatic organisms

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Tens of thousands of micro-pollutants are dispersed in the environmental matrices (waters, soil, sediment, air, organisms) due to industrial or agricultural activities or from domestic wastes. During the last decades, the impact of the environment on human health has been put in evidence and is now a recognized fact, perfectly illustrated by some studies, especially in the fields of health, environment, and epidemiology.

In this context, a new concept, “exposome”, was born in 2005 and encompasses all environmental exposures during the life of an individual. This concept provides a holistic view of human health and disease. It includes exposures from lifestyle, diet, and social environment, as well as the body’s responses to these exposures. The study of human exposure to organic micro-pollutants and the understanding of the impact on health require a multidisciplinary approach. It is closely related to the science of exposure, epidemiology, biology, analytical chemistry, statistics, and bioinformatics.

The development of tools and methods to assess how the micro-pollutants of the environment influence our health will help people to make better decisions in the personal lives of individuals and regulatory agencies could protect populations from risk exposures by triggering new preventative measures and regulations.

Dr. Emmanuelle Vulliet
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • micro-pollutants
  • human exposure
  • exposome
  • human health
  • environmental matrices
  • biological matrices
  • analytical strategy
  • statistical tools
  • bioinformatics
  • epidemiology
  • toxicity

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Isolation, Characterization, and Degradation Performance of the 17β-Estradiol-Degrading Bacterium Novosphingobium sp. E2S
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(2), 115; doi:10.3390/ijerph14020115
Received: 4 November 2016 / Revised: 16 January 2017 / Accepted: 16 January 2017 / Published: 25 January 2017
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Abstract
A 17β-estradiol (E2)-degrading bacterium E2S was isolated from the activated sludge in a sewage treatment plant (STP). The morphology, biological characteristics, and 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequence of strain E2S indicated that it belonged to the genus Novosphingobium. The optimal degrading
[...] Read more.
A 17β-estradiol (E2)-degrading bacterium E2S was isolated from the activated sludge in a sewage treatment plant (STP). The morphology, biological characteristics, and 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequence of strain E2S indicated that it belonged to the genus Novosphingobium. The optimal degrading conditions were 30 °C and pH 7.0. The ideal inoculum volume was 5% (v/v), and a 20-mL degradation system was sufficient to support the removal ability of strain E2S. The addition of extra NaCl to the system did not benefit the E2 degradation in batch culture by this strain. Strain E2S exhibited high degradation efficiency with initial substrate concentrations of 10–50 mg·L−1. For example, in mineral salt medium containing 50 mg·L−1 of E2, the degradation efficiency was 63.29% after seven days. In cow manure samples supplemented with 50 mg·L−1 of E2, strain E2S exhibited 66.40% degradation efficiency after seven days. The finding of the E2-degrading strain E2S provided a promising method for removing E2 from livestock manure in order to reduce the potential environmental risks of E2. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Organic Micro-Pollutants and Human Exposure)
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Open AccessArticle Polypyrrole-Grafted Coconut Shell Biological Carbon as a Potential Adsorbent for Methyl Tert-Butyl Ether Removal: Characterization and Adsorption Capability
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(2), 113; doi:10.3390/ijerph14020113
Received: 28 November 2016 / Revised: 28 December 2016 / Accepted: 4 January 2017 / Published: 24 January 2017
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Abstract
Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) has been used as a common gasoline additive worldwide since the late twentieth century, and it has become the most frequently detected groundwater pollutant in many countries. This study aimed to synthesize a novel microbial carrier to improve
[...] Read more.
Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) has been used as a common gasoline additive worldwide since the late twentieth century, and it has become the most frequently detected groundwater pollutant in many countries. This study aimed to synthesize a novel microbial carrier to improve its adsorptive capacity for MTBE and biofilm formation, compared to the traditional granular activated carbon (GAC). A polypyrrole (PPy)-modified GAC composite (PPy/GAC) was synthesized, and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analysis. The adsorption behaviors of MTBE were well described by the pseudo-second-order and Langmuir isotherm models. Furthermore, three biofilm reactors were established with PPy/GAC, PPy, and GAC as the carriers, respectively, and the degradation of MTBE under continuous flow was investigated. Compared to the biofilm reactors with PPy or GAC (which both broke after a period of operation), the PPy/GAC biofilm column produced stable effluents under variable treatment conditions with a long-term effluent MTBE concentration <20 μg/L. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter pittii may be the predominant bacteria responsible for MTBE degradation in these biofilm reactors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Organic Micro-Pollutants and Human Exposure)
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Open AccessArticle Occurrence of Emerging Micropollutants in Water Systems in Gauteng, Mpumalanga, and North West Provinces, South Africa
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(1), 79; doi:10.3390/ijerph14010079
Received: 18 November 2016 / Revised: 28 December 2016 / Accepted: 10 January 2017 / Published: 13 January 2017
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Abstract
The ubiquitous occurrence of emerging micropollutants (EMPs) in water is an issue of growing environmental-health concern worldwide. However, there remains a paucity of data regarding their levels and occurrence in water. This study determined the occurrence of EMPs namely: carbamazepine (CBZ), galaxolide (HHCB),
[...] Read more.
The ubiquitous occurrence of emerging micropollutants (EMPs) in water is an issue of growing environmental-health concern worldwide. However, there remains a paucity of data regarding their levels and occurrence in water. This study determined the occurrence of EMPs namely: carbamazepine (CBZ), galaxolide (HHCB), caffeine (CAF), tonalide (AHTN), 4-nonylphenol (NP), and bisphenol A (BPA) in water from Gauteng, Mpumalanga, and North West provinces, South Africa using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-HRTOFMS). Kruskal-Wallis test and ANOVA were performed to determine temporal variations in occurrence of the EMPs. Principal component analysis (PCA) and Surfer Golden Graphics software for surface mapping were used to determine spatial variations in levels and occurrence of the EMPs. The mean levels ranged from 11.22 ± 18.8 ng/L for CAF to 158.49 ± 662 ng/L for HHCB. There was no evidence of statistically significant temporal variations in occurrence of EMPs in water. Nevertheless, their levels and occurrence vary spatially and are a function of two principal components (PCs, PC1 and PC2) which controlled 89.99% of the variance. BPA was the most widely distributed EMP, which was present in 62% of the water samples. The detected EMPs pose ecotoxicological risks in water samples, especially those from Mpumalanga province. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Organic Micro-Pollutants and Human Exposure)
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Open AccessArticle Serum Polychlorinated Biphenyls Increase and Oxidative Stress Decreases with a Protein-Pacing Caloric Restriction Diet in Obese Men and Women
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(1), 59; doi:10.3390/ijerph14010059
Received: 5 October 2016 / Revised: 28 December 2016 / Accepted: 4 January 2017 / Published: 10 January 2017
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Abstract
The purposes were to compare the effects of a: (1) 12-week P-CR weight loss (WL) diet (Phase 1) between obese men and women and; (2) 52-week modified P-CR (mP-CR) vs. heart healthy (HH) weight maintenance (WM) diet (Phase 2) on serum PCBs and
[...] Read more.
The purposes were to compare the effects of a: (1) 12-week P-CR weight loss (WL) diet (Phase 1) between obese men and women and; (2) 52-week modified P-CR (mP-CR) vs. heart healthy (HH) weight maintenance (WM) diet (Phase 2) on serum PCBs and oxidative stress biomarkers (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, TBARS; total antioxidant capacity, TAC) in 40 obese participants (men, n = 21; women, n = 19). Participants received dietary counseling and monitoring of compliance. PCBs, TBARS, and TAC were assessed at weeks −1 (CON), 12 (WL), and 64 (WM). Following WL (Week 12), concomitant with reductions in TBARS (0.24 ± 0.15 vs. 0.18 ± 0.11 µM; p < 0.01), PCB serum concentrations (86.7 ± 45.6 vs. 115.6 ± 65.9 ng/g lipid; p < 0.01) and TAC (18.9 ± 2.6 vs. 19.9 ± 2.3 nmol/mL; p < 0.02) were increased similarly in men and women. At the end of WM (Week 64), a significant effect of time × group interaction was observed for % change in PCB 170 and 187; whereby mP-CR values were higher compared to HH (PCB170: 19.31% ± 26.48% vs. −6.61% ± 28.88%, p = 0.02; PCB187: −3.04% ± 17.78% vs. −21.4% ± 27.31%, p = 0.04). PCB changes were positively correlated with TBARS levels (r > 0.42, p < 0.05) and negatively correlated with body weight, fat mass, and abdominal fat (r < −0.46, p < 0.02). Our results support mobilization of stored PCBs as well as enhanced redox status following a 12-week P-CR WL diet. Additionally, a 52-week mP-CR WM diet demonstrated an advantage in preventing weight gain relapse accompanied by an increase in circulating PCBs compared to a traditional HH diet. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Organic Micro-Pollutants and Human Exposure)
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Open AccessArticle Predictors of Urinary 3-Phenoxybenzoic Acid Levels in 50 North Carolina Adults
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(11), 1172; doi:10.3390/ijerph13111172
Received: 29 August 2016 / Revised: 3 November 2016 / Accepted: 18 November 2016 / Published: 23 November 2016
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Abstract
Limited data are available on the non-chemical stressors that impact adult exposures to pyrethroid insecticides based on urinary biomonitoring. The urinary metabolite, 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA), is commonly used to assess human exposure to a number of pyrethroids. In a further analysis of published
[...] Read more.
Limited data are available on the non-chemical stressors that impact adult exposures to pyrethroid insecticides based on urinary biomonitoring. The urinary metabolite, 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA), is commonly used to assess human exposure to a number of pyrethroids. In a further analysis of published study data, we quantified urinary 3-PBA levels of 50 adults over a single, 24-h sampling period and examined the associations between the biomarker measurements and selected non-chemical stressors (demographic, lifestyle, and dietary factors). A convenience sample of 50 adults was recruited in North Carolina in 2009–2011. Participants collected individual urine voids (up to 11) and filled out activity, food, and pesticide use diaries over a 24-h sampling period. Urine voids (n = 326) were analyzed for 3-PBA concentrations using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. 3-PBA was detected in 98% of the 24-h composited urine samples. The geometric mean urinary 3-PBA level was 1.68 ng/mL in adults. Time spent outside (p = 0.0006) was a highly significant predictor of natural log-transformed (ln) urinary 3-PBA levels, while consumption of coffee (p = 0.007) and breads (p = 0.019) and ln creatinine levels (p = 0.037) were significant predictors of urinary 3-PBA levels. In conclusion, we identified specific factors that substantially increased adult exposures to pyrethroids in their everyday environments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Organic Micro-Pollutants and Human Exposure)
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