E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Composite Materials"

Quicklinks

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Material Sciences and Nanotechnology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2009)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Ralf Riedel

Institut für Materialwissenschaft, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt, Germany
Website | E-Mail

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Advanced composite materials are of particular interest in basic science as well as in applied research due to their high technological potential in the production of novel materials with tailor-made properties and with performance profiles far beyond those of the existing ones. The aim and scope of the research in this field is the development of materials with superior thermo mechanical, physical and chemical properties. The combination of different types of materials can lead to a great variety of composites, basically distinguished mainly by their constitution. Thus, the most prominent examples are denoted as polymer matrix composites (PMC), metal matrix composites (MMC) and ceramic matrix composites (CMC). In these cases, the composite comprises a matrix material in which one or more phases of another material are dispersed. The dispersed phase can be present in a variety of different morphologies such as fibers, whiskers, particles or platelets. Ideally, the resulting physical or chemical performance of the composite material is superior to that of the pure component phases. Depending on the size of the individual constituents, we distinguish between nano/nano-, nano/micro- and micro/micro-composites.

In this special issue, novel trends related to synthesis and processing suitable for the production of advanced composites as well as the property profile of their derived novel materials are highlighted and discussed.

Prof. Dr. Ralf Riedel
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • synthesis
  • processing
  • structural and functional properties
  • theoretical studies (modeling and simulation)
  • applications

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (5 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-5
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Colon-Specific Drug Delivery Behavior of pH-Responsive PMAA/Perlite Composite
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2010, 11(4), 1546-1556; doi:10.3390/ijms11041546
Received: 12 March 2009 / Accepted: 12 April 2010 / Published: 12 April 2010
Cited by 15 | PDF Full-text (308 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The preparation, characterization, and in vitro release of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA)from methacrylic acid (MAA)/perlite composites (APC) prepared via a sol–gel route are reported. The free-radical graft polymerization of methacrylic acid (MAA) onto perlite particles was studied experimentally. The grafting procedure consisted of surface
[...] Read more.
The preparation, characterization, and in vitro release of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA)from methacrylic acid (MAA)/perlite composites (APC) prepared via a sol–gel route are reported. The free-radical graft polymerization of methacrylic acid (MAA) onto perlite particles was studied experimentally. The grafting procedure consisted of surface activation with 3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl methacrylate (TSPA), followed by free-radical graft polymerization of methacrylic acid (MAA) in ethyl acetate with 2,2΄-azobis-isobutyronitrile (AIBN) initiator. The composition of the composites hybrid materials was determined by FTIR spectroscopy. Equilibrium swelling studies were carried out in enzyme-free simulated gastric and intestinal fluids (SGF and SIF, respectively). The dried composites were immersed in a saturated solution of 5-ASA in water overnight and dried over a period of three days at room temperature and the in vitro release profiles were established separately in both (SGF, pH 1) and (SIF, pH 7.4). The 5-ASA concentration of the solution was measured using a UV-Vis spectrophotometer (205 nm) at different time intervals. The in vitro drug release test revealed that the release rate of 5-ASA in buffer solutions increased with the silica content in the composites; on the contrary, the increase of the content of 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate (TSPA), a coupling agent, decreased the drug release rate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Composite Materials)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Lattice Strain Due to an Atomic Vacancy
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2009, 10(6), 2798-2808; doi:10.3390/ijms10062798
Received: 15 April 2009 / Revised: 29 May 2009 / Accepted: 15 June 2009 / Published: 19 June 2009
Cited by 15 | PDF Full-text (254 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Volumetric strain can be divided into two parts: strain due to bond distance change and strain due to vacancy sources and sinks. In this paper, efforts are focused on studying the atomic lattice strain due to a vacancy in an FCC metal lattice
[...] Read more.
Volumetric strain can be divided into two parts: strain due to bond distance change and strain due to vacancy sources and sinks. In this paper, efforts are focused on studying the atomic lattice strain due to a vacancy in an FCC metal lattice with molecular dynamics simulation (MDS). The result has been compared with that from a continuum mechanics method. It is shown that using a continuum mechanics approach yields constitutive results similar to the ones obtained based purely on molecular dynamics considerations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Composite Materials)
Figures

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview An Overview of Recent Development in Composite Catalysts from Porous Materials for Various Reactions and Processes
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2010, 11(5), 2152-2187; doi:10.3390/ijms11052152
Received: 26 March 2010 / Revised: 3 April 2010 / Accepted: 6 May 2010 / Published: 18 May 2010
Cited by 26 | PDF Full-text (830 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Catalysts are important to the chemical industry and environmental remediation due to their effective conversion of one chemical into another. Among them, composite catalysts have attracted continuous attention during the past decades. Nowadays, composite catalysts are being used more and more to meet
[...] Read more.
Catalysts are important to the chemical industry and environmental remediation due to their effective conversion of one chemical into another. Among them, composite catalysts have attracted continuous attention during the past decades. Nowadays, composite catalysts are being used more and more to meet the practical catalytic performance requirements in the chemical industry of high activity, high selectivity and good stability. In this paper, we reviewed our recent work on development of composite catalysts, mainly focusing on the composite catalysts obtained from porous materials such as zeolites, mesoporous materials, carbon nanotubes (CNT), etc. Six types of porous composite catalysts are discussed, including amorphous oxide modified zeolite composite catalysts, zeolite composites prepared by co-crystallization or overgrowth, hierarchical porous catalysts, host-guest porous composites, inorganic and organic mesoporous composite catalysts, and polymer/CNT composite catalysts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Composite Materials)
Open AccessReview Investigations on the Mechanical Properties of Conducting Polymer Coating-Substrate Structures and Their Influencing Factors
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2009, 10(12), 5257-5284; doi:10.3390/ijms10125257
Received: 19 October 2009 / Revised: 21 November 2009 / Accepted: 3 December 2009 / Published: 8 December 2009
Cited by 21 | PDF Full-text (1481 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This review covers recent advances and work on the microstructure features, mechanical properties and cracking processes of conducting polymer film/coatingsubstrate structures under different testing conditions. An attempt is made to characterize and quantify the relationships between mechanical properties and microstructure features. In addition,
[...] Read more.
This review covers recent advances and work on the microstructure features, mechanical properties and cracking processes of conducting polymer film/coatingsubstrate structures under different testing conditions. An attempt is made to characterize and quantify the relationships between mechanical properties and microstructure features. In addition, the film cracking mechanism on the micro scale and some influencing factors that play a significant role in the service of the film-substrate structure are presented. These investigations cover the conducting polymer film/coating nucleation process, microstructure-fracture characterization, translation of brittle-ductile fractures, and cracking processes near the largest inherent macromolecule defects under thermal-mechanical loadings, and were carried out using in situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations, as a novel method for evaluation of interface strength and critical failure stress. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Composite Materials)
Open AccessReview Effect of Interface Structure on Mechanical Properties of Advanced Composite Materials
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2009, 10(12), 5115-5134; doi:10.3390/ijms10125115
Received: 13 October 2009 / Revised: 21 November 2009 / Accepted: 24 November 2009 / Published: 25 November 2009
Cited by 23 | PDF Full-text (812 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper deals with the effect of interface structures on the mechanical properties of fiber reinforced composite materials. First, the background of research, development and applications on hybrid composite materials is introduced. Second, metal/polymer composite bonded structures are discussed. Then, the rationale is
[...] Read more.
This paper deals with the effect of interface structures on the mechanical properties of fiber reinforced composite materials. First, the background of research, development and applications on hybrid composite materials is introduced. Second, metal/polymer composite bonded structures are discussed. Then, the rationale is given for nanostructuring the interface in composite materials and structures by introducing nanoscale features such as nanopores and nanofibers. The effects of modifying matrices and nano-architecturing interfaces on the mechanical properties of nanocomposite materials are examined. A nonlinear damage model for characterizing the deformation behavior of polymeric nanocomposites is presented and the application of this model to carbon nanotube-reinforced and reactive graphite nanotube-reinforced epoxy composite materials is shown. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Composite Materials)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
IJMS Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
ijms@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to IJMS
Back to Top