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Special Issue "Dental Materials"

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A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Material Sciences and Nanotechnology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2011)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jorge Perdigão (Website)

University of Minnesota, Department of Restorative Sciences, Division of Operative Dentistry, 515 SE Delaware St, 8-450 Moos Tower, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Dental research has been transitioning gradually from the classical Restorative Dentistry to Regenerative Dentistry. Regeneration of a functional tooth is a promising strategy for replacing an irreversibly diseased tooth. Pulp-like tissue can now be regenerated in root canal space by stem cells and give rise to odontoblast-like cells producing dentin-like tissue. Three-dimensional porous scaffolds made of mineralized type I collagen mimic the composition of extracellular matrix ofbone and can therefore have the potential of being used as a biomimetic graft material. Additionally, the role of RNA interference (RNAi) and RNA activation (RNAa) may prove to be crucial to treat or prevent dental anomalies and periodontal disease.

The role of metalloproteinases (or MMP’s) inhibitors in preventing the degradation of dentinal collagen fibers has been recently highlighted in dentin adhesion. Other promising areas of research in dental adhesion are the application of colloidal platinum nanoparticles, and guided tissue mineralization to re-mineralize areas etched by phosphoric acid but not infiltrated by the adhesive.

Some of the dental materials recently introduced - low-shrinkage resin composites and Y-TZP-based fixed prostheses - have changed some of the classical concepts of clinical dentistry.

For the first time in 40 years, dentists are using a non-BisGMA resin composite. Shrinkage stresses are reduced with the new silorane-based resin composites. The relevance of using low- or no-shrinking composite materials is that internal stresses occur during the polymerization of all dental composites due to a volumetric contraction. These shrinkage stresses may cause interfacial failures between the restoration and the tooth structure.

Yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia (Y-TZP) and titanium implants have been increasingly used in Dentistry. Y-TZP is used as the infrastructure for crowns, bridges and implant abutments. Research in Clinical Orthopedics has shown that Y-TZP used in hip arthroplasties may undergo transformation under mechanical and/or hydrothermal stress, with degradation of mechanical and tribologic properties. It is not known if these alterations also occur in Y-TZP dental restorations.

Prof. Dr. Jorge Perdigão
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • nanotechnology in Dentistry
  • biocompatibility
  • dental pulp & regeneration
  • scaffold materials
  • stem cells in dentistry
  • dental tissue bioengineering
  • RNA interference
  • dentin ultrastructure & adhesion
  • dentin MMP's & collagen
  • non-shrinking composite materials
  • biodegradation of Y-TZP
  • optimization of dental implant surfaces

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Effect of Filler Size and Temperature on Packing Stress and Viscosity of Resin-composites
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2011, 12(8), 5330-5338; doi:10.3390/ijms12085330
Received: 28 June 2011 / Revised: 12 July 2011 / Accepted: 12 August 2011 / Published: 18 August 2011
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (743 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of filler size on the packing stress and viscosity of uncured resin-composite at 23 °C and 37 °C. A precision instrument used was designed upon the penetrometer principle. Eight resin-composite materials were tested. Packing-stress ranged from 2.60 to 0.43 MPa and viscosity ranged from 2.88 to 0.02 MPa.s at 23 °C. Values for both properties were reduced significantly at 37 °C. Statistical analysis, by ANOVA and post hoc methods, were carried out to check any significant differences between materials tested (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Filler size and distribution will affect the viscosity and packing of resin-composites during cavity placement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dental Materials)
Open AccessArticle Antifungal Activity of Denture Soft Lining Material Modified by Silver Nanoparticles—A Pilot Study
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2011, 12(7), 4735-4744; doi:10.3390/ijms12074735
Received: 23 June 2011 / Revised: 14 July 2011 / Accepted: 18 July 2011 / Published: 22 July 2011
Cited by 23 | PDF Full-text (1907 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Soft liner materials in oral cavity environments are easily colonized both by fungi and dental plaque. These factors are the cause of mucosal infections. The microorganism that most frequently colonizes soft liner materials is Candida albicans. Colonization occurs on the surface [...] Read more.
Soft liner materials in oral cavity environments are easily colonized both by fungi and dental plaque. These factors are the cause of mucosal infections. The microorganism that most frequently colonizes soft liner materials is Candida albicans. Colonization occurs on the surface of materials and within materials. A solution to this problem might involve modification of soft liner materials with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). In this article, we present results showing the antifungal efficacy of silicone soft lining materials modified with AgNPs. The modification process was conducted by dissolving both material components (base and catalyst) in a colloidal solution of AgNPs and evaporating the solvent. Composites with various AgNP concentrations (10, 20, 40, 80, 120 and 200 ppm) were examined. The in vitro antifungal efficacy (AFE) of composite samples was 16.3% to 52.5%. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dental Materials)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Titanium Immobilized with an Antimicrobial Peptide Derived from Histatin Accelerates the Differentiation of Osteoblastic Cell Line, MC3T3-E1
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2010, 11(4), 1458-1470; doi:10.3390/ijms11041458
Received: 23 February 2010 / Revised: 23 March 2010 / Accepted: 23 March 2010 / Published: 2 April 2010
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (380 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of titanium immobilized with a cationic antimicrobial peptide (JH8194) derived from histatin on the biofilm formation of Porphyromonas gingivalis and differentiation of osteoblastic cells (MC3T3-E1). The titanium specimens (Ti) were immobilized with [...] Read more.
The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of titanium immobilized with a cationic antimicrobial peptide (JH8194) derived from histatin on the biofilm formation of Porphyromonas gingivalis and differentiation of osteoblastic cells (MC3T3-E1). The titanium specimens (Ti) were immobilized with JH8194, according to the method previously described. The colonization of P. gingivalis on JH8194-Ti was significantly lower than that on control- and blocking-Ti. JH8194-Ti enhanced the mRNA expressions of Runx2 and OPN, and ALPase activity in the MC3T3-E1, as compared with those of control- and blocking-Ti. These results, taken together, suggested the possibility that JH8194-Ti may be a potential aid to shorten the period of acquiring osseointegration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dental Materials)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Nanocharacterization in Dentistry
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2010, 11(6), 2523-2545; doi:10.3390/ijms11062523
Received: 19 March 2010 / Revised: 5 June 2010 / Accepted: 7 June 2010 / Published: 17 June 2010
Cited by 15 | PDF Full-text (2381 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
About 80% of US adults have some form of dental disease. There are a variety of new dental products available, ranging from implants to oral hygiene products that rely on nanoscale properties. Here, the application of AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) and optical [...] Read more.
About 80% of US adults have some form of dental disease. There are a variety of new dental products available, ranging from implants to oral hygiene products that rely on nanoscale properties. Here, the application of AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) and optical interferometry to a range of dentistry issues, including characterization of dental enamel, oral bacteria, biofilms and the role of surface proteins in biochemical and nanomechanical properties of bacterial adhesins, is reviewed. We also include studies of new products blocking dentine tubules to alleviate hypersensitivity; antimicrobial effects of mouthwash and characterizing nanoparticle coated dental implants. An outlook on future “nanodentistry” developments such as saliva exosomes based diagnostics, designing biocompatible, antimicrobial dental implants and personalized dental healthcare is presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dental Materials)
Open AccessReview Dental Implant Systems
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2010, 11(4), 1580-1678; doi:10.3390/ijms11041580
Received: 20 February 2010 / Revised: 28 March 2010 / Accepted: 30 March 2010 / Published: 12 April 2010
Cited by 34 | PDF Full-text (637 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. [...] Read more.
Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s) in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dental Materials)
Figures

Open AccessReview Surface Modification of Biomedical and Dental Implants and the Processes of Inflammation, Wound Healing and Bone Formation
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2010, 11(1), 354-369; doi:10.3390/ijms11010354
Received: 24 December 2009 / Revised: 18 January 2010 / Accepted: 20 January 2010 / Published: 25 January 2010
Cited by 32 | PDF Full-text (130 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Bone adaptation or integration of an implant is characterized by a series of biological reactions that start with bone turnover at the interface (a process of localized necrosis), followed by rapid repair. The wound healing response is guided by a complex activation [...] Read more.
Bone adaptation or integration of an implant is characterized by a series of biological reactions that start with bone turnover at the interface (a process of localized necrosis), followed by rapid repair. The wound healing response is guided by a complex activation of macrophages leading to tissue turnover and new osteoblast differentiation on the implant surface. The complex role of implant surface topography and impact on healing response plays a role in biological criteria that can guide the design and development of future tissue-implant surface interfaces. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dental Materials)

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