Special Issue "Novel Insights into the Origins and Management of Congenital Heart Disease"

A special issue of Journal of Cardiovascular Development and Disease (ISSN 2308-3425).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2016)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Bradley B. Keller

Department of Pediatrics and the Cardiovascular Innovation Institute, University of Louisville, 302 E. Muhammad Ali Blvd, Louisville, KY 40202, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: congenital heart disease; cardiac development; developmental biomechanics; tissue engineering; stem cells; biomedical innovation
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Paolo Angelini

Center for Coronary Anomalies at the Texas Heart Institute, 6624 Fannin St., Suite 2780, Houston, TX 77030, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: coronary artery anomalies; coronary angioplasty; congenital heart disorders; embryology; anatomy of congenital heart defects

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

While cardiovascular development and human cardiovascular (CV) malformations have been a major focus of basic and clinical investigation for centuries, major advances in defining the molecular, epigenetic, and environmental regulation of normal morphogenesis and adaptation of the heart and vasculature and the origins of congenital malformations in a broad spectrum of invertebrate and vertebrate species have occurred over the past 30 years. Multiple molecular cascades have been identified that regulate CV cell, tissue, and organ morphogenesis and remodeling, highlighting the dynamic systems biology required for a successful transition to mature CV structure and function. The purpose of this Special Issue is to provide updates relevant to CV morphogenesis and malformations, as well as novel findings in the pursuit of CV stem cell therapies including stem cells and tissue engineering that rely on developmental mechanisms of mesodermal CV lineage induction and maturation.

Prof. Dr. Bradley B. Keller
Prof. Dr. Paolo Angelini
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Cardiovascular Development and Disease is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

 

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular development
  • Congenital heart disease
  • Coronary artery anomalies
  • Embryogenesis
  • Morphogenesis
  • Stem Cells
  • Tissue Engineering

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview Genetic and Epigenetic Mechanisms Linking Air Pollution and Congenital Heart Disease
J. Cardiovasc. Dev. Dis. 2016, 3(4), 32; doi:10.3390/jcdd3040032
Received: 28 July 2016 / Revised: 8 November 2016 / Accepted: 26 November 2016 / Published: 29 November 2016
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Abstract
Epidemiological studies strongly suggest that parental air pollutants exposure during the periconceptional period may play a major role in causing fetal/newborn malformations, including a frequent heterogeneity in the methods applied and a difficulty in estimating the clear effect of environmental toxicants. Moreover, only
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Epidemiological studies strongly suggest that parental air pollutants exposure during the periconceptional period may play a major role in causing fetal/newborn malformations, including a frequent heterogeneity in the methods applied and a difficulty in estimating the clear effect of environmental toxicants. Moreover, only some couples exposed to toxicants during the pre-conception period give birth to a child with congenital anomalies. The reasons for such phenomena remain elusive but they can be explained by the individual, innate ability to metabolize these contaminants that eventually defines the ultimate dose of a biological active toxicant. In this paper, we reviewed the major evidence regarding the role of parental air pollutant exposure on congenital heart disease (CHD) risk as well as the modulating effect on detoxification systems. Finally, major epigenetic alterations induced by adverse environment contaminants have been revised as possible mechanisms altering a correct heart morphogenesis. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview The Dorsal Mesenchymal Protrusion and the Pathogenesis of Atrioventricular Septal Defects
J. Cardiovasc. Dev. Dis. 2016, 3(4), 29; doi:10.3390/jcdd3040029
Received: 23 August 2016 / Revised: 16 September 2016 / Accepted: 20 September 2016 / Published: 26 September 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (6032 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Congenital heart malformations are the most common type of defects found at birth. About 1% of infants are born with one or more heart defect on a yearly basis. Congenital Heart Disease (CHD) causes more deaths in the first year of life than
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Congenital heart malformations are the most common type of defects found at birth. About 1% of infants are born with one or more heart defect on a yearly basis. Congenital Heart Disease (CHD) causes more deaths in the first year of life than any other congenital abnormality, and each year, nearly twice as many children die in the United States from CHD as from all forms of childhood cancers combined. Atrioventricular septal defects (AVSD) are congenital heart malformations affecting approximately 1 in 2000 live births. Babies born with an AVSD often require surgical intervention shortly after birth. However, even after successful surgery, these individuals typically have to deal with lifelong complications with the most common being a leaky mitral valve. In recent years the understanding of the molecular etiology and morphological mechanisms associated with the pathogenesis of AVSDs has significantly changed. Specifically, these studies have linked abnormal development of the Dorsal Mesenchymal Protrusion (DMP), a Second Heart Field-derived structure, to the development of this congenital defect. In this review we will be discuss some of the latest insights into the role of the DMP in the normal formation of the atrioventricular septal complex and in the pathogenesis of AVSDs. Full article
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Open AccessReview Stem Cell Therapy and Congenital Heart Disease
J. Cardiovasc. Dev. Dis. 2016, 3(3), 24; doi:10.3390/jcdd3030024
Received: 14 April 2016 / Revised: 7 June 2016 / Accepted: 28 June 2016 / Published: 5 July 2016
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Abstract
For more than a decade, stem cell therapy has been the focus of intensive efforts for the treatment of adult heart disease, and now has promise for treating the pediatric population. On the basis of encouraging results in the adult field, the application
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For more than a decade, stem cell therapy has been the focus of intensive efforts for the treatment of adult heart disease, and now has promise for treating the pediatric population. On the basis of encouraging results in the adult field, the application of stem cell-based strategies in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) opens a new therapy paradigm. To date, the safety and efficacy of stem cell-based products to promote cardiac repair and recovery in dilated cardiomyopathy and structural heart disease in infants have been primarily demonstrated in scattered clinical case reports, and supported by a few relevant pre-clinical models. Recently the TICAP trial has shown the safety and feasibility of intracoronary infusion of autologous cardiosphere-derived cells in children with hypoplastic left heart syndrome. A focus on preemptive cardiac regeneration in the pediatric setting may offer new insights as to the timing of surgery, location of cell-based delivery, and type of cell-based regeneration that could further inform acquired cardiac disease applications. Here, we review the current knowledge on the field of stem cell therapy and tissue engineering in children with CHD, and discuss the gaps and future perspectives on cell-based strategies to treat patients with CHD. Full article
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