Special Issue "Stimuli Responsive Biomaterials"

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A special issue of Journal of Functional Biomaterials (ISSN 2079-4983).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2011)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Evangelos Manias (Website)

Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA
Interests: polymer and organic materials; soft materials; nanostructures; nanocomposites
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Maria M. Jimenez-Gasco (Website)

Department of Plant Pathology, Penn State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA
Interests: Materials-organisms interactions; Antimicrobial materials; Prevention of biofilm formation; Microbial population biology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Living organisms control many of their functions through structures and materials that respond to stimuli, including environmental changes. From muscle-control to sensing to membrane separations, and from digestion to antibody activity, nature thrives on functions of membranes, cells, organs, or whole organisms responding to and being controlled by external stimuli.

Synthetic materials and designed structures that capitalize on stimuli response are also being increasingly investigated: Materials functions are designed by “property switching” as a response to external stimuli (for example, by structural reconstruction, chemical reactions, or geometry changes, triggered by stimuli such as temperature, chemical environment / pH, light, electric signals, and mechanical deformations). These type of materials find applications in hydrogels, water-soluble polymers, intelligent surfaces, organic and inorganic membranes with triggered functions, shape-memory composites, drug encapsulation and release, sensors, actuators, and so on.

This special issue of the Journal of Functional Biomaterials is envisioned to bring together examples dealing with these latter, synthetic, materials and explore the widest possible range of stimuli. Of particular interest are articles which deal with synthetic materials designed to have specific interactions with biological systems, bioinspired and biomimetic materials/structures, materials designed to prevent biofilm formation, and systems that exhibit response to multiple stimuli. Review articles are also welcome to showcase the broader range of scientific advances around a coherent theme.

Prof. Dr. Evangelos Manias
Prof. Dr. Maria M. Jimenez-Gasco
Guest Editors

Keywords

  • stimuli responsive and stimuli sensing materials
  • smart materials and structures (stimuli controlled or triggered function)
  • stimuli, such as, temperature, chemical (incl. pH, antigens, chemical compounds), light or electrical signals, mechanical stimuli (stress, force, pressure)
  • intelligent hydrogels and surfaces
  • biocompatible or bioderived materials
  • bioinspired structures and materials

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Computational Study of pH-sensitive Hydrogel-based Microfluidic Flow Controllers
J. Funct. Biomater. 2011, 2(3), 195-212; doi:10.3390/jfb2030195
Received: 13 July 2011 / Revised: 10 August 2011 / Accepted: 22 August 2011 / Published: 25 August 2011
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (1525 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This computational study investigates the sensing and actuating behavior of a pH-sensitive hydrogel-based microfluidic flow controller. This hydrogel-based flow controller has inherent advantage in its unique stimuli-sensitive properties, removing the need for an external power supply. The predicted swelling behavior the hydrogel [...] Read more.
This computational study investigates the sensing and actuating behavior of a pH-sensitive hydrogel-based microfluidic flow controller. This hydrogel-based flow controller has inherent advantage in its unique stimuli-sensitive properties, removing the need for an external power supply. The predicted swelling behavior the hydrogel is validated with steady-state and transient experiments. We then demonstrate how the model is implemented to study the sensing and actuating behavior of hydrogels for different microfluidic flow channel/hydrogel configurations: e.g., for flow in a T-junction with single and multiple hydrogels. In short, the results suggest that the response of the hydrogel-based flow controller is slow. Therefore, two strategies to improve the response rate of the hydrogels are proposed and demonstrated. Finally, we highlight that the model can be extended to include other stimuli-responsive hydrogels such as thermo-, electric-, and glucose-sensitive hydrogels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stimuli Responsive Biomaterials)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Stimuli-Responsive Polymer Brushes for Flow Control through Nanopores
J. Funct. Biomater. 2012, 3(2), 239-256; doi:10.3390/jfb3020239
Received: 31 December 2011 / Revised: 16 March 2012 / Accepted: 19 March 2012 / Published: 26 March 2012
Cited by 22 | PDF Full-text (678 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Responsive polymers attached to the inside of nano/micro-pores have attracted great interest owing to the prospect of designing flow-control devices and signal responsive delivery systems. An intriguing possibility involves functionalizing nanoporous materials with smart polymers to modulate biomolecular transport in response to [...] Read more.
Responsive polymers attached to the inside of nano/micro-pores have attracted great interest owing to the prospect of designing flow-control devices and signal responsive delivery systems. An intriguing possibility involves functionalizing nanoporous materials with smart polymers to modulate biomolecular transport in response to pH, temperature, ionic concentration, light or electric field. These efforts open up avenues to develop smart medical devices that respond to specific physiological conditions. In this work, an overview of nanoporous materials functionalized with responsive polymers is given. Various examples of pH, temperature and solvent responsive polymers are discussed. A theoretical treatment that accounts for polymer conformational change in response to a stimulus and the associated flow-control effect is presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stimuli Responsive Biomaterials)
Open AccessReview Biocompatible Polymer/Quantum Dots Hybrid Materials: Current Status and Future Developments
J. Funct. Biomater. 2011, 2(4), 355-372; doi:10.3390/jfb2040355
Received: 6 October 2011 / Revised: 23 November 2011 / Accepted: 28 November 2011 / Published: 2 December 2011
Cited by 17 | PDF Full-text (924 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Quantum dots (QDs) are nanometer-sized semiconductor particles with tunable fluorescent optical property that can be adjusted by their chemical composition, size, or shape. In the past 10 years, they have been demonstrated as a powerful fluorescence tool for biological and biomedical applications, [...] Read more.
Quantum dots (QDs) are nanometer-sized semiconductor particles with tunable fluorescent optical property that can be adjusted by their chemical composition, size, or shape. In the past 10 years, they have been demonstrated as a powerful fluorescence tool for biological and biomedical applications, such as diagnostics, biosensing and biolabeling. QDs with high fluorescence quantum yield and optical stability are usually synthesized in organic solvents. In aqueous solution, however, their metallic toxicity, non-dissolubility and photo-luminescence instability prevent the direct utility of QDs in biological media. Polymers are widely used to cover and coat QDs for fabricating biocompatible QDs. Such hybrid materials can provide solubility and robust colloidal and optical stability in water. At the same time, polymers can carry ionic or reactive functional groups for incorporation into the end-use application of QDs, such as receptor targeting and cell attachment. This review provides an overview of the recent development of methods for generating biocompatible polymer/QDs hybrid materials with desirable properties. Polymers with different architectures, such as homo- and co-polymer, hyperbranched polymer, and polymeric nanogel, have been used to anchor and protect QDs. The resulted biocompatible polymer/QDs hybrid materials show successful applications in the fields of bioimaging and biosensing. While considerable progress has been made in the design of biocompatible polymer/QDs materials, the research challenges and future developments in this area should affect the technologies of biomaterials and biosensors and result in even better biocompatible polymer/QDs hybrid materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stimuli Responsive Biomaterials)

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